Do You Want To Educate People... Or Make Money?

10 replies
I've been working with some up-and-coming copywriters.

And something that befuddles me is...

They think going after lower budget clients is actually easier.

It's not.

Here's why...

When you go after people who don't value copy (and have an almost non-existent budget,) you're gonna need to educate them.

"You charge $297? That's expensive. What makes you better than what's-his-face that only wants $97 for a sales letter?"

Boom! You just became a commodity. You're just another copywriter - trying to scape together enough cash to maybe pay your bills. Congratulations!

Here's the thing...

If your skills are good enough to generate massive profits for your clients, you need to completely change your own positioning.

The "low hanging fruit" type of clientele require the most education to see your value.

And guess what?

They'll still argue your price - until the relationship has reached the pitiful depths of a married couple fighting about money.

Remember...

Your skills unlock profits that would otherwise never exist.

The people who know that... and passionately want to access those profits are looking for the RIGHT copywriter - who will give them the keys to the castle.

They KNOW they NEED a copywriter. Your job is to position yourself - so they believe YOU are that person.

Don't waste your time trying to convince people that $297 is a worthy investment to unlock a 5 or 6 figure profit potential. It's not. Get over it.

Mark
#educate #make #money #people
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
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    • Mark,

      I feel for you. Problem is those who switch from an employee to businessperson/self-employed are still of an employee mindset. If they were making 8, 10 or 20 dollars an hour and they see they can charge 30, 40 or 50 an hour in their mind they don't care if they are a commodity. From their point of view they have doubled, tripled or quadrupled their previous income.

      Trying to convince them they have to add value is vague to those of an employee mindset, but seeing better money then they ever thought was possible is not vague. They cannot understand value clearly until they start to write themselves their paychecks. This is what every teacher, mentor or leader faces.

      Not to mention the world of business becomes another reality they never considered, experienced or knew exited beyond their beliefs.

      If it's any help teach your students that they are now BUSINESS OWNERS. It's what I started doing years ago and it weeded out those who won't last and reduced my frustration.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

        Problem is those who switch from an employee to businessperson/self-employed are still of an employee mindset.
        You're right.

        A TON of people who get into this game are just happy to not be clocking in at a lame, degrading job.

        But what they don't realize is...

        There will always be a HUGE need for copywriters.

        After all...

        Civilization is built on the need to grow.

        And with growth comes more problems.

        And with more problems comes...

        The need for more products, more services, more solutions and more innovative thinkers.

        Even if money (and the economy) as we know it tanks tomorrow, it won't stop people from wanting...

        ...wanting something else, something different, something new, something better...

        Just something.

        In a world where almost everyone fears their job or business will disappear, there's no better security than being someone that people call upon to help them spread an advertising message.

        Powerful stuff, right?

        What makes being a copywriter brilliant is...

        The more problems that exist, the greater the need for solutions.

        Which means...

        There's NEVER a time you aren't in constant demand - if, if, if you position yourself as the answer that people all over the planet are actively looking for.

        And that IF is where a lot of copywriters flub.

        Instead of acknowledging, "Wow, I have a skill that makes money appear - where it otherwise might never exist," they go after prospects who can't understand the value of copywriting.

        It makes absolutely zero sense.

        Yet copywriters who position themselves in this dead-end-direction are the rule, rather than the exception. (Just my opinion based on what I personally see.)

        Don't worry though...

        Because that's to your benefit.

        There are more high-quality clients for you - when other copywriters sell themselves short...

        ...failing to see their real, rainmaker value.

        Yes, this IS a business.

        As Daniel Scott recently pointed out:

        The guys I know in this biz who are consistently successful - and keep growing - are not only talented writers and salespeople...

        They also take this business VERY seriously.

        They hit deadlines. They study controls. And they work their damn asses off.

        If you want to be successful, you've gotta do it too.

        The good news is that if you're willing to apply yourself and work hard, the sky's the limit.
        He's right.

        It's just a matter of getting newer copywriters to dump the old programming from their job (or scarcity-thinking in general)...

        ...and helping them see how crucial they are in making the world-go-round.

        Mark
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Mark, your point about educating prospects
          was what a consulting client was considering
          doing.

          Not from the point of the value in his service,
          but being helpful.

          Problem was with that line of thinking is
          for his type of business, those prospects
          are a long way from making the buying decision.
          No matter how good the message is, they arenn't buying.

          So we came up with a different strategy where the ones who are
          ready to buy are also centers of influence.

          And the best way to contact them is by phone
          rather than direct mail.

          The copywriter legend Gordon Herschell Lewis wrote
          the original direct mail. To get better results we had to come up
          with who have made a decision to buy.

          That question had never been asked before,
          maybe because the answer won't lead to being paid to write the letter.

          This is an example of having a better strategy
          will trump the best tactic, meaning the top written letter going to a bad list.

          Best,
          Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author JonMills
    Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

    I've been working with some up-and-coming copywriters.

    And something that befuddles me is...

    They think going after lower budget clients is actually easier.

    It's not.

    Here's why...

    When you go after people who don't value copy (and have an almost non-existent budget,) you're gonna need to educate them.

    "You charge $297? That's expensive. What makes you better than what's-his-face that only wants $97 for a sales letter?"

    Boom! You just became a commodity. You're just another copywriter - trying to scape together enough cash to maybe pay your bills. Congratulations!

    Here's the thing...

    If your skills are good enough to generate massive profits for your clients, you need to completely change your own positioning.

    The "low hanging fruit" type of clientele require the most education to see your value.

    And guess what?

    They'll still argue your price - until the relationship has reached the pitiful depths of a married couple fighting about money.

    Remember...

    Your skills unlock profits that would otherwise never exist.

    The people who know that... and passionately want to access those profits are looking for the RIGHT copywriter - who will give them the keys to the castle.

    They KNOW they NEED a copywriter. Your job is to position yourself - so they believe YOU are that person.

    Don't waste your time trying to convince people that $297 is a worthy investment to unlock a 5 or 6 figure profit potential. It's not. Get over it.

    Mark
    Beautifully said Mark!
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    • Profile picture of the author Shadowflux
      I think this is a problem all writers are facing and it goes beyond just copywriting. A few years ago there were a lot of writers but it seemed like the competition was based more on marketing and quality than anything else.

      Now there are tons of writers and everyone is trying to undersell everyone else. I honestly don't understand why or how people work for such low rates, you would make more money as a construction worker. It's not even worth it to post an ad for writing services anymore, I just contact people directly and have a much better response rate.

      Low grade clients are great when you're starting out but if you're not moving up the ladder with each new client then you're sinking.

      I'm not really worried, in the end, because the type of clients I get would never hire a cut rate writer. My clients want quality, professionalism, and reliability. I deliver exactly that and it's why they pay me so much more.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by Shadowflux View Post

        the type of clients I get would never hire a cut rate writer. My clients want quality, professionalism, and reliability. I deliver exactly that and it's why they pay me so much more.
        And the beauty of what you just said is...

        It's actually easier to position yourself to get high-quality, high-paying clients than it is to take on people who believe $297 is a lot of money to pay for a letter.

        People with a "charge" about money want so much more; more of your time, energy, attention, etc. "Is it done yet? Is it done yet? Is it done yet?" They watch their investment like a hawk. Whereas, experienced entrepreneurs know that everything needs to be tested... and simply go through the process of refining (if necessary) - until the control is established.

        Two completely price points. Two totally different mentalities. And while one might think it's easy to get (and satisfy) small budget clients, it typically isn't.

        Like my wife often asks...

        "Can we try a new position?!?!"

        Ask yourself that same question for your own biz.

        Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Ricardo Furtado
    Interesting points of view. Thanks for sharing.
    Regards
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    Ricardo Furtado

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  • Profile picture of the author sanf0rd1
    you're right. mindset is very important when it comes to copywriting
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  • Profile picture of the author tehdellguy22
    who says you can't do both. make money educating people!
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  • Profile picture of the author DanSharp
    Speaking of new positions. Here's the other side of this argument:
    Not Wanted
    DL was a hodgepodge of brands including Jameson and Tullamore Dew. They made good products, but Irish whiskey wasn’t doing well. When you asked whiskey experts what they thought of Jameson, Esquire magazine reports, “they weren’t impressed.” But then in 1988, a company named Pernod Ricard bought IDL and had an interesting idea…
    Stop selling whiskey to whiskey drinkers. Sell it to vodka drinkers, instead.
    And the rest is history. Jameson hadn’t impressed the whiskey drinkers, but the people used to drinking light tasting spirits, like vodka and white-rum, couldn’t get enough.
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