How Emotion-Packed Sales Copy Increases Conversions

12 replies
Imagine you are seated under a tree at a restaurant. A big river and a pond are a few meters away.

A waiter brings you three big mouth-watering juicy lemons, cleanly washed.

The attention-grabbing yellow color and the unique smell of the lemons momentarily captivate you. You get one of the three fruits. You feel the rough but tender peel.

'These are tasty, juicy lemons!' you murmur to yourself.

With a sharp knife the waitress cuts each of the fruits into half. As the two halves fall on their sides, you observe the tasty juice oozing down the cut surfaces.

A cool pleasant breeze is softly hauled at you carrying with it the smell of the lemons in front of you.

You close your eyes and recall last time you ate a lemon.

By the time you open your eyes a glass of well - prepared lemonade is sitting in front of you.

As you stretch your hand to pick it, you experience a tremor, like that of a small earthquake. It shakes your mouth walls as your taste buds collide with citric acid.

Uncontrollable secretion of saliva starts.

As you take the first sip, you close your eyes.
When you open them you realize the waitress is looking at you.

She knows that is your favorite drink.

In the above account I have tried to show the power of emotions in persuading prospects in order to increase sales for a restaurant.

I was moving towards the end of the sales letter. I wanted to power-pack the letter with emotion.

Using the power of imagination to arouse emotion is a good way to increase conversions.

Pick on a benefit or two in your sales copy; ask your prospect to imagine herself enjoying it. Target the emotions you want to arouse first.

As a copywriter, I like using this approach because it makes prospects feel what it will be like to make a purchase.

You will never enjoy the sweet taste of sugar in your tea unless you stir it. Likewise we are born with emotions; you will never effectively use emotions in your prospects unless you stir them in your sales copy.

The bigger the number of senses you use, the stronger will your sales copy be --- emotion wise.

Some people say imagination is mere day- dreaming. It plays no role in copywriting.

What do you think about it?


[MOD EDIT: Removing what caused this thread to get deleted]
#conversions #copy #emotionpacked #increases #sales
  • Profile picture of the author Tim R
    Originally Posted by Jomuli3 View Post

    In the above account I have tried to show the power of emotions in persuading prospects in order to increase sales for a restaurant.

    I was moving towards the end of the sales letter. I wanted to power-pack the letter with emotion.
    Just out of interest, what emotions do you think you've targeted here?
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    • Profile picture of the author Memetics
      If you really liked lemons then I would say it created desire and anticipation, but if you don't then it's just visualisation...which does has its place in copy but only as a carrier for the emotion itself.

      Dependent on why you're using the particular narrative you could create the emotions of...

      Anger: The glass was punched out of your hand.
      Fear: There's a 50% chance it's a very rare species of toxic lemon.
      Disgust: Maggots came out of the lemon along with the juice.
      Surprise: The juice tasted of blackcurrant
      Joy: It was a kind deed by someone who is important to you.
      Shame: You swore on your childs life never to drink lemonade again.

      The purpose of emotion in copy is to achieve access to the emotional part of the brain (which makes all decisions) and bypass the critical factor. Once your copy is on that route you can attach your call to action to the convoy and away it goes, ready to influence without being analysed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jomuli3
    Emotions are strong feelings. Fear, greed,vanity, lust, pride, envy, anxiety,anger and love are some of the useful emotions. Emotions can be classified as simple, complex and pure.

    The emotion targeted in the example above is --- relaxation (complex emotion)

    When you paint a picture of someone relaxing by the river side over a lemonade drink you are creating a strong feeling/emotion associated with relaxation.

    The list of emotions is too long to write. The most important thing to note is that what you are writing about evokes a strong feeling.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    I'm curious...

    What controls exercise a "relaxing visual" to stimulate the buy, buy, buy emotions?

    Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
      Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

      What controls exercise a "relaxing visual" to stimulate the buy, buy, buy emotions?
      The closest I can think of is International Living:

      Retire Overseas

      Admittedly it only uses the "relaxing visual" as a hook, but it's been working for decades.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Bowring
    Lemons... yuck!

    Too sour!

    I've always loved that International Living copy.

    --- Ross
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    I first learned this lemon slice visualization technique through the Jose Silva method many, many years ago as a tool to control/focus your own mental imaging.

    I won't waste our time attempting to rewrite the whole thing - many of you are probably already familiar, but the short version goes like this:

    First you focus on the appearance of the lemon. The shine. The bright yellow color.

    Then you hold the lemon and feel it in your hand. The smooth skin. The feel of the pores and the plump, juicy ripeness as you squeeze it gently.

    Then you slice it open and see the juice slowly drip over the glistening fleshy fruit.

    Then you bring the lemon to your nose and inhale deeply, taking in the fresh, clean citrus scent.

    Then you bring the slice to your mouth, open our lips wide and sink your teeth deeply into the middle in a huge bite...

    When your mouth waters, you did it right.
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    • Profile picture of the author Scott McKinstry
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post

      I first learned this lemon slice visualization technique through the Jose Silva method many, many years ago as a tool to control/focus your own mental imaging.
      Jose Silva! I remember reading his "Mind Control Method" book when I was in sixth grade. I wanted to develop super powers, and I vaguely recall he had some advice on telepathy/telekinesis. Sadly, I failed.

      I think OP is a good example of "verbal sampling" ... using your copy to provide your readers with a virtual experience of the product, as close as possible to the real thing.

      Claude Hopkins was a lifelong evangelist of the power of "sampling", as he learned early on from his door-to-door salesman days as a boy selling his mother's homemade silver polish:

      I found that I sold about one woman in ten by merely talking the polish at the door. But when I could get into the pantry and demonstrate the polish I sold to nearly all. (My Life In Advertising, near the beginning of Chapter Two.)
      \

      When you can't give a free sample of the product, a "verbal sample" is a good substitute.

      The emotion it most strongly triggers is desire, pure and simple, for whatever you're touting. And for those who don't like the thing being offered (like the warriors who can't stomach lemons) then it does a great job of excluding them (of course, if it's a restaurant, you'd want to be careful what you choose as your the representative example of what you offer, to catch all likely prospects. Maybe throw in a few different dishes and visualize them in the same way.)
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  • Profile picture of the author sanf0rd1
    LOL i like the lemon example. great post btw! =]
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  • Profile picture of the author steven8433
    I love lemonade. but your sentences are too spaced out from each other - it makes this hard to read.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mr Bill
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post

      I first learned this lemon slice visualization technique through the Jose Silva method many, many years ago...
      Wow! Jose Silva! I thought I was the only one. I can see how it applies.
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