You are only ONE "swipe" away from becoming rich...and that swipe is:

by gjabiz
25 replies
Coming up in just a moment. But first;

Do you accept the premise promoted by Kennedy, Halbert, Abraham, et al. which goes something like:

You are only one sales letter away from striking it rich.

Is that true to you?

Can one sales letter bring in huge amounts of money in short periods of time? Well, those who preach this as gospel have letters which prove their point, don't they?

Halbert wants you to write out ads by hand, and if you accept this idea as a way to expedite your success as a copywriter, then why not find just ONE letter, which has proven effective and write it out and study it?

Does such a letter exist?

Yes it does. And here it is:

Can You Write a Letter Like This One?

It begins with
----------------------

Can You Write a Letter
Like This One?


Answer “Yes,” and you’ll never have to worry about
your job or rely on others for your livelihood …


Instead, you will be in big demand, earning
great money, writing a few hours a day
from anywhere in the world you choose to live.

-------------------------
Write a letter like THIS one, it sez. The one you are reading. It has sold untold thousands of dollars, if not millions, of product. It has been running for years, it brings in a steady flow of new customers.


Thousands of people have responded to it. Have you taken the time to write it out by hand...and then analyze it?



Have you used one of the many templates or copy "cheat" sheets posted here and figured out WHY it is so effective? Why it works?



Instead of looking for dozens of successful letters, now you have ONE to study. Swipe it.



Write it out by hand. Dissect it. Study it. Read it, over and over. It shows you exactly how to write great copy. It has all the elements you will need to get started.



Why does the headline work? How was the deck copy put together? At what point did you become a believer? Where did your interest turn to desire? What proof elements did you accept?



See the Bob Bly testrimonial...see all the people, their stories.



So can you write a letter like that one? If so, you are NOW ready to write the one sales letter which will change your life forever.


IF you spent the next two weeks reading and writing out that letter, and did nothing else, you'd be further ahead than some of these guys who have invested hundreds in courses, books and programs...because, they tell you right up front..."copy" ("swipe") THIS letter and six figures a year is the basement of what you can do as a writer of sales letters.

Why waste time and money when all you need is right in front of you, and it is free for you to study and learn from?

gjabiz

PS. I advocate studying the sales pages of those successful people whom you would buy from. Ask yourself the right questions about the weapons of influence (or elements of copy) being used on YOU...and you have some pretty good education.


gjabiz
#richand #swipe
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

    PS. I advocate studying the sales pages of those successful people whom you would buy from. Ask yourself the right questions about the weapons of influence (or elements of copy) being used on YOU...and you have some pretty good education.

    gjabiz
    That's the rub, Gordon. A rookie doesn't know the right questions to ask.

    He needs to understand persuasion elements and copy components before studying successful sales letters will do him a lick of good.

    It's like handing a new law student a bunch of contracts and saying, "Okay, learn Contract Law." Won't do him any good whatsoever if he hasn't been taught the basic principles of law.

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      A rookie doesn't know the right questions to ask. He needs to understand persuasion elements and copy components before studying successful sales letters will do him a lick of good.
      That's true. But even a rookie knows it appeals to him or her, and wants to understand why.

      That creates curiosity, and the motivation to understand. In time, the understanding becomes clearer, and the mechanisms become obvious.

      But something has to plant that seed. For many, this letter is where they started. For me, it was the famous International Living letter by Bill Bonner ("You look out your window....").

      It really doesn't matter in the beginning if they copy all 27 pages by hand or not, as long as it has sparked their imagination. At some point, they will study this letter and be able to understand the elements contained within it.

      But to copy even without understanding does ingrain a sense of cadence. To copy with understanding does that, and much more. Neither is wasted time.

      And if they're smart, at some point they will copy this letter out by hand again - along with many others. Is that a fool's errand? Perhaps. But the only way to know for sure is to try. Many highly successful copywriters do swear by the results. I'd agree.

      But if someone had to pick just one letter - and only one style - then this one could do it. It has all the right elements. But gjabiz's point goes deeper than than that.

      It's about asking one's self what makes something appealing... what makes it work. It's about not relying on an endless stream of conflicting opinions, but forming your own. Differing opinions help, to be sure, but so do personal insights. And the learning never stops.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

        That's true. But even a rookie knows it appeals to him or her, and wants to understand why.

        That creates curiosity, and the motivation to understand. In time, the understanding becomes clearer, and the mechanisms become obvious.

        But something has to plant that seed. For many, this letter is where they started. For me, it was the famous International Living letter by Bill Bonner ("You look out your window....").

        It really doesn't matter in the beginning if they copy all 27 pages by hand or not, as long as it has sparked their imagination. At some point, they will study this letter and be able to understand the elements contained within it.

        But to copy even without understanding does ingrain a sense of cadence. To copy with understanding does that, and much more. Neither is wasted time.

        And if they're smart, at some point they will copy this letter out by hand again - along with many others. Is that a fool's errand? Perhaps. But the only way to know for sure is to try. Many highly successful copywriters do swear by the results. I'd agree.

        But if someone had to pick just one letter - and only one style - then this one could do it. It has all the right elements. But gjabiz's point goes deeper than than that.

        It's about asking one's self what makes something appealing... what makes it work. It's about not relying on an endless stream of conflicting opinions, but forming your own. Differing opinions help, to be sure, but so do personal insights. And the learning never stops.
        A damaging admission is a persuasion element and has a specific purpose.

        A call to action is a copy component and has a specific purpose.

        Teach a rookie the specific purpose of the most frequently used persuasion elements and copy components, and he'll learn a lot faster when studying successful sales letters.

        The "motivation to understand" is fine. Give it some camping gear and provisions, though, before sending it out into the wilderness.

        Alex
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
          Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

          Teach a rookie the specific purpose of the most frequently used persuasion elements and copy components, and he'll learn a lot faster when studying successful sales letters.
          That's true too - but if that rookie can relate what is being taught to something already experienced, they'll learn even faster.

          "Aha, so THAT'S what that letter was doing..."

          In the end, it doesn't really matter which came first, because there are many ways to learn. It's cumulative. What matters most is doing something.

          IMO, struggling to understand a proven winner without knowing all the terms is going to be more beneficial than waiting for the perfect amount of knowledge first. The technical learning may go faster, too. Or not.

          One point that comes to mind is that early copywriters didn't have access to the resources we do today. They had perhaps a scarce book or two, and a few examples. Yet some of them became copywriting masters by careful study and application of the few resources they did have. The same could be done today.
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          • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
            Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

            .

            One point that comes to mind is that early copywriters didn't have access to the resources we do today. They had perhaps a scarce book or two, and a few examples. Yet some of them became copywriting masters by careful study and application of the few resources they did have. The same could be done today.
            You're advocating taking a slower drive to the same destination.

            Doesn't make sense to take US1 with all the traffic lights when you can take I95.

            Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    Good share Gordon old boy. I don't for one moment think that a beginner could swipe that and use it as a basis for a copywriting career. But... for someone who has a few runs on the board... it's invaluable. The writing and layout is rather old-fashioned - but that's easily fixed. Oh...and "Dear Reader" or "Dear Friend" or "Dear Fellow Hemorroid-Sufferer" is very old-school. I groan every time I read one of those salutations. Yes yes... I know Halbert was keen on it. And the other fossils... but things have changed. Although "Dude" can work - to the right crowd (Kern pinched that from me as an email title BTW).

    Gordon - your thread title is a beauty. ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    Think of this as a supplement to the courses you own, the books and the mentoring, a simple and easy exercise which may (or may not) help you to understand those copy components or persuasion elements, OK?

    Grab 5 pieces of paper out of your printer.
    At the top right corner write ATTENTION on the first, INTEREST on the second, DESIRE on the third, CONCLUSION on the fourth and ACTION on the fifth. Now you are ready to learn.

    You may recognize these as the old world steps in the sales process.

    On the first sheet, place a big X at the top middle. This represents the intersection between you and the promotion. Then use your little friends, who, what, when, where, why and how...to analyze the copy.

    HOW did you get there? If online, or at a website, were you searching? Or was it a link in a blog or forum post? Were you just curious?

    NOW, write out the headline by hand. Circle any words which resonate with you or make you curious. What is the appeal? Does the copy make it simple, easy, quick..or is there money or sex involved?

    Are you the TARGET market? If you want to be a six figure copywriter, and you came across this AWAI promotion via search, you can probably quickly discern you ARE the target market. Hate to write? May not be for you, but wait, the promotion says you don't even need to do that...simple, easy, anyone can do it is implied? or inferred?

    Does it interest you enough to keep reading? Grab sheet 2 and ask the helpers to help...WHAT interests me? WHY? At the point of copy where attention turns to interest, most readers are now looking for an escape...they want to read something which will help them decide to leave.

    Did you find a reason to leave? Unbelievable claims? Hype? If you continue to read, reach for the DESIRE page. What words are used to arouse your desire? Is there a bullet point list which adds to this desire? A testimonial?

    Have you been convinced you might want this? At this point eye tracking shows a sprint to the price, and as often as not, for a reason to leave without spending any money. On this AWAI promotion the reader will see some low monthly payments as an option. Could be just the thing which gets the reader to commit.

    Now on page 4, how does the copy conclude? Does it build a strong case for you to buy? What will you lose if you don't buy? Do they go over the benefits?

    If you hate your boss, or work and the work from the beach appeal sounds good to you, what do they do here to reinforce that? What stories are told, usually in the form of testimonials? What PROOF do they give you which reassures your decision?

    And finally, on page 5, how do they get you to ACT. Do they offer ez payments? Bonus materials? The inclusion in a private club? A shared journey? Help? Support?

    Now a rookie, noob, or beginning copywriter who has read a couple of books or just searched ths forum can use these five pages to get a better understanding of how the copy was written, what persuasion elements were used and see the copy components.

    Use these 5 pages with one of the many copy blueprints posted here, or copy outlines and you have a supplemental course which may (or may not) expedite your success as a copywriter.

    gjabiz

    PS. Walmart has 500 sheets of paper for around 3 bux, enough to evaluate 100 direct response promotions, online or off.

    AND, put your little friends to work...Who, What, Where, When, Why and How.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    I can personally attest to the fact that one sales letter can bring a fortune.

    One letter I wrote back in 2001 for a fitness product made me over 7 figures.

    It's simply because of leverage. Whether online or off... all it takes is one good letter.

    But, REAL money is made from the follow up to that letter... the backend, repeat biz, new products, etc... to me, that's why any marketer is one letter away from riches.

    Because all it takes is one letter to put the entire process into motion.

    I've got well over a dozen friends in the fitness niche that can also claim that one letter made them rich.

    Mike Geary was doing 12 million a year with his abs program.

    That AWAI letter is a gold mine... I've used it many, many times as a swipe... and it can be used in just about any market.

    Great post and mention of that letter Gordon, it's one of the only ones I've personally studied almost weekly for the past few years.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    The reason newbies (and even loads of veterans) can't properly dissect your example of a perfect letter is...

    A lot of copywriters get stuck on technique, rather than the emotions (and circumstances) that are being strategically targeted (and why.)

    The amount of triggers in just the headline and sub-headlines alone are plentiful. (And the deck copy feels like it's peeling back the layers of my brain - inserting itself directly into my very consciousness.)

    There needs to be a "copywriter's emotional x-ray vision handbook" that teaches people what to swipe, why... and how to use it for any market...

    ...something that spells out the psychology behind targeting and triggering specific emotion/circumstance.

    Anyway...

    Great post. Really awesome.

    Mark

    P.S. I'm sure such a handbook exists. I study self-development more than copywriting. So I honestly wouldn't know.
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  • Profile picture of the author roley
    I would say it's not the letter that makes you rich

    It's your PRODUCT and MARKETING SENSE

    Words on a page mean nothing, if the product is crap and if the market isn't starving.

    Give me crappiest copy in the world with a product that people are starving and i will sell tons.

    We need to get away from the idea that sales letters are the MAGIC bullet that can fix a crap product and poor marketing.
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    • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
      Originally Posted by roley View Post

      I would say it's not the letter that makes you rich

      It's your PRODUCT and MARKETING SENSE

      Words on a page mean nothing, if the product is crap and if the market isn't starving.

      Give me crappiest copy in the world with a product that people are starving and i will sell tons.

      We need to get away from the idea that sales letters are the MAGIC bullet that can fix a crap product and poor marketing.
      I don't know who the "we" is who need to get away from the idea that sales letters can fix a crappy product, mainly because I don't know what that is.

      Can you give examples of products people are starving for?

      Now a story (or two).

      Gary Halbert told Ben Suarez to get into the Astrology business, Ben hated the idea and thought all astrology products were crap. But, he was about to go under and decided to give it a go. You would find that Ben still thinks astrology is a crappy product, however, he's learned not to bias his marketing based on his own feelings.

      Ben wrote one of the great breakthrough ads of all time, ASTROLOGY TODAY, and it ran on the back of the Sunday comics and brought in millions of dollars. There wasn't a line of starving people who wanted this product, one even the marketer regarded as crappy.

      It was the PROMOTION. It was the letters, the sales letters which sold the product.

      And this is just one example...in my experience an OPINION on a product tends to be subjective, my Rolex collecting friend thinks my Timex is a piece of crap.

      As for you selling tons of product which people are starving for,, give us an example of such a product and answer the question;

      IF you know people are starving for this, why aren't you making tons of money?

      WORDS on the paper or page, DO mean something. In copywriting they mean everything.

      Billions of dollars have been made from the sale of "crappy" products with words on a page.

      Could you offer up some real life examples of what a crappy product is and a couple of those which people are starving for?

      gjabiz
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

        WORDS on the paper or page, DO mean something. In copywriting they mean everything.
        You've just stated a containment.

        Words on paper or a page is exactly what copyrighting is so it's a given that they mean everything within that context. It can't be a catalyst to itself.

        For the statement to make any sense you'd need to argue that words on paper or a page (copywriting) is everything in marketing...
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        • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
          It was a statement in response to the quoted comment by Roley. Sorry if you didn't get that. I'll re-read to see where I made the error.
          gjabiz

          Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

          You've just stated a containment.

          Words on paper or a page is exactly what copyrighting is so it's a given that they mean everything within that context. It can't be a catalyst to itself.

          For the statement to make any sense you'd need to argue that words on paper or a page (copywriting) is everything in marketing...
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      • Profile picture of the author discrat
        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post


        Billions of dollars have been made from the sale of "crappy" products with words on a page.

        gjabiz
        Yes and Billions have been given back in the form of Refunds on the sale of those "crappy"
        products
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by roley View Post

      I would say it's not the letter that makes you rich

      It's your PRODUCT and MARKETING SENSE

      Words on a page mean nothing, if the product is crap and if the market isn't starving.

      Give me crappiest copy in the world with a product that people are starving and i will sell tons.

      We need to get away from the idea that sales letters are the MAGIC bullet that can fix a crap product and poor marketing.
      If by "crap product" you mean poorly made, I agree...

      other than that, there are no crap products, only crap copywriters.

      The Halbert thing about a hungry market is nonsense.

      I know some of you idolize Halbert, but he's been outsold by many people with better ideas.

      Was sitting here by my indoor pool watching my girlfriend skinny dip and was trying to think of a crap product...

      couldn't think of any. Only could think of crap copywriters trying to sell something they had no idea how to sell.

      In December there was a meeting in Salt Lake City Utah between an entrepreneur and a brilliant marketer.

      Guy was trying to sell lamp shades.

      Most would say there wasn't a hungry market.

      Marketer came up with a brilliant idea.

      Every house has lamp shades. Virtually every woman of the house wants the place to smell good.

      How bout lamp shades that deodorize the place? Yeah, the heat from the bulbs causes a reaction to the treated shade that sends pleasant aromas into the air. Kinda like the whole Febreze marketing plan...but with a twist.

      Imagine the marketing potentials with this idea?

      Hopefully you're smart enough to see the possibilities.

      I just made the whole story up off the top of my head to show you how you can take a product that doesn't seem exciting, and turn it into a fortune.

      If you're creative enough, you can take any product and make a fortune with it.

      We've got a lot of "copywriters", but very few creative thinkers.
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      • Profile picture of the author BrianDavid
        All I know is, your subject line worked on me. Nice one.
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    • Profile picture of the author splitTest
      Originally Posted by roley View Post

      I would say it's not the letter that makes you rich

      It's your PRODUCT and MARKETING SENSE

      Words on a page mean nothing, if the product is crap and if the market isn't starving.

      Give me crappiest copy in the world with a product that people are starving and i will sell tons.

      We need to get away from the idea that sales letters are the MAGIC bullet that can fix a crap product and poor marketing.
      Good copy can sell a crappy product.

      If good copy can help one product outsell a virtually identical product (and we know it can), good copy can sell an inferior product.

      Good copy can sell $400 pencils (or rather "writing implements") .

      Still, knowing how to write a letter like that doesn't guarantee riches.

      You have to know how to buy the right mailing lists, drive traffic to wherever your letter lives online, etc. etc. Or maybe that's the easy part? I don't think so.

      Right list counts much more than the right copy.

      There's a whole marketing machine in place dedicated to getting eyes on that swipe.

      Nevertheless, I'm also writing this one out by hand. We're going to all end up sounding alike.
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      • Profile picture of the author lometogo
        Originally Posted by splitTest View Post

        Good copy can sell a crappy product.
        Yeh, but who wants to spend their hours doing that?

        I suspect the happiest copywriters are those flogging products/services they love.

        Maybe it's not an option available to all, but I find I'm happier when I work in areas that resonate with who I am.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jennie Heckel
    Hi All,

    Interesting comments.

    Here's some food for thought...

    Why does one WSO sales letter bring in BAGS AND BAGS OF FAST MONEY...

    While another...similarly wrote WSO sales letter (by the same copywriter)...DISMALLY FLOPS?

    THINGS TO REMEMBER...

    Most of the time some of the reasons a sales letter FLOPS...

    Are not so much due to crappy products or crappy copy but a MARKETING AND NICHE MIS-MATCH ERROR OR A PREVENTABLE MARKETING OR LAUNCH ERROR...

    By this I mean a mis-match between the:

    - "desire" and the "need" of the product and the RIGHT PRICE for the offer PLUS
    - making sure you are getting the "RIGHT BUYER" with a "HIGH LEVEL of NEED" and...
    - a STRONG DESIRE to fill that need" combined with..
    - a "limited time offer at the RIGHT PRICE" THE CUSTOMER CAN AND WILL AFFORD.

    Having a million dollar generating sales letter or even a "TOP 10 WSO OF THE WEEK" OR "TOP WSO OF THE DAY" COMES FROM A PERFECT MATCH AND PROPER MARKETING WITH ALL THOSE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE AND MORE PERFECTLY COMBINED.

    Because the highest converting and best matched sales letter at a perfect price that fills the need and excites a desire -- WON'T SELL IF NOBODY SEES IT.

    So don't always blame the copywriter for a stinky launch, because the first thing I will ask for is:

    1. The WSO STATS
    2. how many people (eyeballs saw the offer) and if there were any
    3. problems with delivery (website hosting problems -- video delays),
    4. problems with page loading, images not showing up
    5. super slow load times, (use Amazon3 for videos),
    6. payment gate way problems - or payment links broken,
    7. poor email copy
    8. poor JV pages
    9. poor JV affiliate support
    10. Stiff competition the day of the launch

    To be honest, the list is endless as to why a WSO launch can fail...

    So don't whack your copywriter's head off until you are for sure you did not contribute to a poor launch by making a simple marketing mistake...that happens much more often than most copywriters know or even bother to check.

    I ask for WSO STATS from all my launches so I know what the numbers were for my own use so I know and can work with and properly leverage the emerging buying trends to make my copy more successful and make more money for my clients.

    I want to know the real reasons why some of my WSO copy converts better than others too.

    Some clients I work with are MASTER MARKETERS -- some never launched a WSO before, so that makes a HUGE DIFFERENCE on their success -- or lack of it.

    I notice those WSO launches with decent JV numbers and good email copy combined with 'hot to buy lists' (not worn out ones from too many offers)...all these 'little things' make a HUGE DIFFERENCE ON THE FINAL $$ PAYOFF!

    Just my 2 cents.

    Jennie Heckel
    Sales Letter Copywriter
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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      Hi all, hi Gordon,

      Gordon, I hope you're feeling better.

      I've followed some of Gordon's advice and spent the last several weeks with This Letter: Can You Write a Letter Like This One?

      I've read it through the first time, trying not to analyze it, but just read it as if I were a potential prospect.

      The second time reading the letter, I wrote some general notes, thoughts, questions, observations. The more I observed, the more I noted things I should be noting.

      Then I hand wrote the letter.

      If you've got any interest in seeing what a 24 page typed sales letter looks like when written out by hand, you can check it out here: Handwritten: Can You Write A Letter Like This One

      This took a hella lot longer than I thought it would. Once I got into it though, I genuinely enjoyed doing it and I will definitely be doing this more.

      As I wrote, I kept a list on index cards of the things I wanted to keep track of the next time through.

      And the next time through, I dissected and categorized the elements of the letter.

      I created a spreadsheet to track the following Elements:

      Who is the ideal reader
      Problems
      Promises
      Proof Elements
      The Offer
      Call to Action
      Features

      I also kept track of repeated words or phrases.

      Under each main Element, I listed the appropriate sub-category addressed in the letter. For example, within the first 10 pages of the letter, there were 20 different Promises made, such as:
      You will have Job Security
      You can make great money
      You can work from where ever you want
      etc.
      And then, for example, under You Can Make Great Money, I listed:
      p1. Subhead:earning great money
      p1. people who have all the money they need
      p1. A world where money and time have a different meaning
      p2. around $300,000 a year
      p3. I could make a lot more
      p3. $500,000 … even $1 million a year
      p3. earn a very comfortable six-figure income from home
      p3. your financial destiny squarely in your own hands
      p3. Testimonial: "The ability to pay my bills no longer worries me, even in these rough times
      p4. being paid very well to do it.
      p4. I went from a $6.50 per hour grocery store shelf stocker to a six-figure income earner in about a year.
      p4. letters like the one you're reading now can pay so well.
      p4. have five new projects to choose from … each worth anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 in potential income
      p4. Sidebar: Make $210,000
      p4. Sidebar: Get paid $210,000
      p4. Sidebar: Command $8,000 per letter
      p4. Sidebar: $96,000 in writing fees alone
      p4. Sidebar: royalties can add up to another $120,000
      p4. Sidebar: over $210,000 a year

      etc. (These are just the first four pages).

      I took different color highlighters and picked apart the letter, line by line. If a phrase or sentence fit into my idea of what were one of the above elements, I highlighted it and then categorized it on the spreadsheet.

      If you'd like to check out the spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...#gid=337806892

      And the highlighted letter: Dissected-A Letter Like This One

      My expectation was that my different colored highlighters would create something of a map – showing me a section of orange Problems, followed by a large chunk of blue Promises with sections of green Proof mixed in once or twice a page.

      It didn't work out this way though - it looks like all of the different elements are pretty thoroughly mixed together. Although I'm sure that my current understanding or classification of the different elements are largely incorrect. For example, I have a really tough time determining if a particular factual sentence qualifies as proof - or if it's just talk.

      Regardless, it's interesting to see how efficiently the letter is written and how almost all of the sentences fit into a relatively small number of categories.

      When I get to writing my own letters, I think this spreadsheet (once completed) will be very helpful as I try to identify the specific problems, promises, etc. I want to address for my own target reader. When editing my own work, I would think that if a sentence doesn't fit into one of my categories, then it probably has to go.

      As useful as I believe this exercise is and will be, I had to stop after about 9 1/2 pages, as it's just taking way too long to complete. I've been at it for almost a week and I haven't even gotten to a single hint of an offer or call to action yet.

      If I expect to become a copywriter any time soon, I've got to start actually writing stuff I can test and hopefully profit from.

      And that's where I'm off to next. I've got some questions as I move forward on this, but that's for another thread.

      Thanks so much for turning me onto This Letter, Gordon. These exercises have been helpful and have me inspired.

      Best,
      -Rob
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      • Profile picture of the author enger
        Beautiful ad.... I really love all the concrete imagery the writer uses, and how he/she paints a picture of the end benefits without sounding contrite or incredible. Thanks for posting.
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      • Profile picture of the author aloeveraa
        Originally Posted by perryny View Post

        Hi all, hi Gordon,

        Gordon, I hope you're feeling better.

        I've followed some of Gordon's advice and spent the last several weeks with This Letter: Can You Write a Letter Like This One?

        I've read it through the first time, trying not to analyze it, but just read it as if I were a potential prospect.

        The second time reading the letter, I wrote some general notes, thoughts, questions, observations. The more I observed, the more I noted things I should be noting.

        Then I hand wrote the letter.

        If you've got any interest in seeing what a 24 page typed sales letter looks like when written out by hand, you can check it out here: Handwritten: Can You Write A Letter Like This One

        This took a hella lot longer than I thought it would. Once I got into it though, I genuinely enjoyed doing it and I will definitely be doing this more.

        As I wrote, I kept a list on index cards of the things I wanted to keep track of the next time through.

        And the next time through, I dissected and categorized the elements of the letter.

        I created a spreadsheet to track the following Elements:

        Who is the ideal reader
        Problems
        Promises
        Proof Elements
        The Offer
        Call to Action
        Features

        I also kept track of repeated words or phrases.

        Under each main Element, I listed the appropriate sub-category addressed in the letter. For example, within the first 10 pages of the letter, there were 20 different Promises made, such as:
        You will have Job Security
        You can make great money
        You can work from where ever you want
        etc.
        And then, for example, under You Can Make Great Money, I listed:
        p1. Subhead:earning great money
        p1. people who have all the money they need
        p1. A world where money and time have a different meaning
        p2. around $300,000 a year
        p3. I could make a lot more
        p3. $500,000 ... even $1 million a year
        p3. earn a very comfortable six-figure income from home
        p3. your financial destiny squarely in your own hands
        p3. Testimonial: "The ability to pay my bills no longer worries me, even in these rough times
        p4. being paid very well to do it.
        p4. I went from a $6.50 per hour grocery store shelf stocker to a six-figure income earner in about a year.
        p4. letters like the one you're reading now can pay so well.
        p4. have five new projects to choose from ... each worth anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 in potential income
        p4. Sidebar: Make $210,000
        p4. Sidebar: Get paid $210,000
        p4. Sidebar: Command $8,000 per letter
        p4. Sidebar: $96,000 in writing fees alone
        p4. Sidebar: royalties can add up to another $120,000
        p4. Sidebar: over $210,000 a year

        etc. (These are just the first four pages).

        I took different color highlighters and picked apart the letter, line by line. If a phrase or sentence fit into my idea of what were one of the above elements, I highlighted it and then categorized it on the spreadsheet.

        If you'd like to check out the spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...#gid=337806892

        And the highlighted letter: Dissected-A Letter Like This One

        My expectation was that my different colored highlighters would create something of a map - showing me a section of orange Problems, followed by a large chunk of blue Promises with sections of green Proof mixed in once or twice a page.

        It didn't work out this way though - it looks like all of the different elements are pretty thoroughly mixed together. Although I'm sure that my current understanding or classification of the different elements are largely incorrect. For example, I have a really tough time determining if a particular factual sentence qualifies as proof - or if it's just talk.

        Regardless, it's interesting to see how efficiently the letter is written and how almost all of the sentences fit into a relatively small number of categories.

        When I get to writing my own letters, I think this spreadsheet (once completed) will be very helpful as I try to identify the specific problems, promises, etc. I want to address for my own target reader. When editing my own work, I would think that if a sentence doesn't fit into one of my categories, then it probably has to go.

        As useful as I believe this exercise is and will be, I had to stop after about 9 1/2 pages, as it's just taking way too long to complete. I've been at it for almost a week and I haven't even gotten to a single hint of an offer or call to action yet.

        If I expect to become a copywriter any time soon, I've got to start actually writing stuff I can test and hopefully profit from.

        And that's where I'm off to next. I've got some questions as I move forward on this, but that's for another thread.

        Thanks so much for turning me onto This Letter, Gordon. These exercises have been helpful and have me inspired.

        Best,
        -Rob
        Amazing work. I was thinking of doing the same thing that you are doing. It's comforting to know that there's other people who genuinely hand write it out too.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kees Hoekerd
    Great swipe! I actually got into copywriting by landing on this sales page by coincidence. That's how compelling it is.

    Thanks Rob, for your notes on this!
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