15 replies
It's tough to watch the Super Bowl commercials being a direct response marketer.

So many ads literally have NOTHING to do with the product.

I get that billion dollar companies like Coke and Bud basically have unlimited budgets for marketing and branding... but it still makes me sick to think of a company dropping 4 mil on an ad that literally has ZERO to do with the product.

I thought Turbo Tax was one of the worst offenders...

Turbo Tax Super Bowl Commercial 2014 (Video) – Prom & Sean! | 2014 Super Bowl Commercials : Just Jared

I don't know, maybe it's just me... but I cringe when I see these and think of the ad agencies who are getting paid huge money to put out this kind of nonsense.
#ads #bowl #super
  • Profile picture of the author johnlagoudakis
    Agreed.

    They're paying 4 million to entertain lol
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    It's the obligatory day after the Superbore commercial conversation thread.

    Didn't watch the thing.

    I'm tired of the attention these big corporations receive by dumping millions of dollars to appeal to drunkards.

    When's the last time one of these ads actually made a huge impact in a company's bottom line?

    Seriously?

    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    This is the best one. Clichéd? Yes. Still good.

    It's from a local attorney in Savannah, Georgia.


    http://deadspin.com/georgia-lawyers-...ing-1514869904
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    • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
      Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

      This is the best one. Clichéd? Yes. Still good.

      It's from a local attorney in Savannah, Georgia.

      Jamie Casino 2 Minute Super Bowl Commercial - Casino's Law - YouTube

      Georgia Lawyer's Local Super Bowl Ad Is Batshit Amazing
      Joe, I missed that one... that's pretty bad a**.

      He should team up with Saul Goodman... they'd make quite a pair.
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    • Profile picture of the author Memetics
      It's all about "Top Of Mind" for the big corporations, but the Turbo tax ad uses a technique known as "Semantic netting". It assumes nearly all of it's potential customers have graduated high school and uses the high school prom as it's target avatar.

      Being a time of emotional turbulence for very many people, it latches it's brand onto an important established associative network of beliefs and ideas in the viewers mind.

      If it was a negative time for you then Turbo tax feels your pain and offers a nice tax rebate to ameliorate your suffering and soothe your painful recollections.

      If it was a happy time for you (you were the "Sean") it reminds you of your happy time and links to it through either Associative Bias or the "Halo Effect".

      Quite a lot of thought has gone into this ad. The clever part is where you first see the guy on the couch and then your referential index is switched to his when you realise he's watching the prom as a wallflower.

      Just like a lot of the viewers probably did when they were at their own prom trying to get the courage to "man up" and ask a girl to dance.

      Get it right and you're the hero and the man. Get it wrong (rejected) and public humiliation in front of your peer group awaits you.

      As far as creating emotion in the viewer goes...it's mother lode stuff.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        "Cringe"?

        "Tired of the attention these big corporations receive"?

        Lighten up guys... Superbowl commercials are fun to watch.

        Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by Memetics View Post

        It's all about "Top Of Mind" for the big corporations, but the Turbo tax ad uses a technique known as "Semantic netting". It assumes nearly all of it's potential customers have graduated high school and uses the high school prom as it's target avatar.

        Being a time of emotional turbulence for very many people, it latches it's brand onto an important established associative network of beliefs and ideas in the viewers mind.
        Smart. I got it when I saw the ad, although I didn't know the term "Semantic netting".

        Frankly, for years, I wasn't a fan of "Top Of Mind" ads. I even wrote a chapter in a book, condemning them. But I get it.

        I don't think these ads sell anything directly, but they the make the local ads more profitable. They also make it easier to sell, when the Brand name gives a good feeling.

        For example, decades ago, the show Wild Kingdom was hosted my Mutual of Omaha. Did the segues sell? probably not. But when the Mutual Of Omaha agent called you, you were more likely to take the call, and more likely to buy.

        I think the reason we Direct Marketing types don't like image advertising, is that it doesn't directly sell. And by itself, probably won't produce results.

        But a national Image Ad, if it sticks in the mind...will help the local ads from dealers and franchise owners.

        Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

        These companies aren't small time. They manufacture products, then sell the products to stores that then in turn sell the product to customers.


        if you're a big company, the only way you increase your profits is to get your product into stores. Store owners see advertising. The more they see your product advertised, the higher they'll jump to carry your stuff.
        Yup, a conclusion I came to after a couple of decades in Direct Response.

        National image ads support local ads, and local dealers. These image ads are nearly always for products with very wide appeal, and apply to just about everyone; insurance, beer, taxes, cars....

        And then local dealers, retailers, distributors....advertise to local consumers. They may use direct mail, and probably should.

        There is real science behind these ads. We wouldn't use them, because we want to make money from our trackable efforts. We aren't building a national brand, for our nation of local retailers to capitalize on.

        But these huge advertisers are.

        Dan Kennedy isn't the only smart guy in the room.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Originally Posted by shawnlebrun;8923858
    I thought Turbo Tax was one of the worst offenders...

    [URL="http://www.justjared.com/2014/02/02/turbo-tax-super-bowl-commercial-2014-video-prom-sean"

    Turbo Tax Super Bowl Commercial 2014 (Video) - Prom & Sean! | 2014 Super Bowl Commercials : Just Jared[/URL]

    I don't know, maybe it's just me... but I cringe when I see these and think of the ad agencies who are getting paid huge money to put out this kind of nonsense.
    Interestingly enough, although I had no idea what the ad was about
    I loved this one because of how it kept my attention until the product was
    revealed. Since the product doesn't need a lot of explanation I don't
    think this was a bad attempt. But I sympathize with your view of
    not explaining the product (branding ads).

    -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Well Shawn, I'll have to disagree with you on this.

    These companies didn't get to where they are by bad decisions.

    The world doesn't run strictly on direct response advertising.

    Contrary to what many believe, these companies know their market better than most think they do. They know it inside and out.

    In a recent post I explained how most of their ads use multiple professional sources. Millions are spent to study the market.

    I know lots of people love to slam their type of advertising...and yet the companies keep getting bigger and richer from people buying their products.

    Most of those who knock the advertising you mentioned, are small time business owners. They have a product and they market it themselves. 99.99% of the time it's info products...something about another B.S. useless secret diet plan...

    thus we have the direct response drum beaters who think it's the only way.

    Now think about this...

    say you own a brewery. You have factories around the world. Your product is carried in thousands and thousands of retail outlets around the world with gross profits in the billions.

    Now let's say you're in charge of the advertising.

    Would you sit down and write a sales letter? Would you do a direct response ad asking customers to contact you?

    Direct response proponents would say yes.

    But wait...

    you have factories around the world. All your stuff gets sold by business owners that own retail outlets. You wouldn't want all these excited people showing up at the factories looking to buy a 6 pack would you? Joe, who works on the assembly line that puts bottle caps on is punching the time clock to do his 8 hours, and then get the heck out of there. He doesn't want to be bothered.

    See where I'm going?

    These companies aren't small time. They manufacture products, then sell the products to stores that then in turn sell the product to customers.

    If you were one of these local stores that sold the big company products, you could do a direct response campaign...then I'd say you were being smart with your advertising dollars.

    Big companies have several reasons to advertise. One of which...

    if you're a big company, the only way you increase your profits is to get your product into stores. Store owners see advertising. The more they see your product advertised, the higher they'll jump to carry your stuff.

    All I would ask someone...if some of this advertising sucks so bad, why are these companies worth so much? Are they dumb? Surprises some of you how they got so big by ignoring the "gurus" who preach direct response only marketing...yet those "gurus" haven't started selling stock yet, or hired thousands of employees, or built factories around the world, or had their product carried in stores from coast to coast and around the world.

    Just my thoughts.
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  • Profile picture of the author wtemradio
    Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

    It's tough to watch the Super Bowl commercials being a direct response marketer.

    So many ads literally have NOTHING to do with the product.

    I get that billion dollar companies like Coke and Bud basically have unlimited budgets for marketing and branding... but it still makes me sick to think of a company dropping 4 mil on an ad that literally has ZERO to do with the product.

    I thought Turbo Tax was one of the worst offenders...

    Turbo Tax Super Bowl Commercial 2014 (Video) - Prom & Sean! | 2014 Super Bowl Commercials : Just Jared

    I don't know, maybe it's just me... but I cringe when I see these and think of the ad agencies who are getting paid huge money to put out this kind of nonsense.
    And I thought I was the only one. :-) Liked the buildup, including the Madden-esque screen squiggles. But the connection to a problem/solution felt a little thin, in the Turbotax ad. In the end, a reaction is a reaction, whether positive or negative. They got us to talk about it, didn't they?
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    max5ty,

    Where have you been... you haven't been posting much?

    I miss your posts, they always bring something to the table.

    Oh, I get it... and it's why I prefaced it with "being a direct response marketer".... it's just my personal thoughts and opinions.

    I mean, seriously, who am I to judge Coke, Bud, Pepsi, etc... and so many more of those billion dollar companies. Got mad love for them, honestly.

    I'm just saying how a lot of the agencies will produce a turd and then charge a ton of money for, well, a turd.

    I'm not saying all ad agencies, but many do.

    It only took a few seasons of watching The Pitch on AMC to see that.

    But I agree when it comes to the fact they didn't get where they are without doing something right.

    And if there's one thing I've learned in the past few years... it's that the copy really has the least to do with results.

    The product is the real key... and then the market/list.

    So, I definitely don't think direct response is the only way... heck, I'm using it less and less with local clients at my agency and doing a lot more social media stuff.

    But... that Maserati ad... I'm still shaking my head, wondering how that all added up to me wanting to buy a Maserati?
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post


      But... that Maserati ad... I'm still shaking my head, wondering how that all added up to me wanting to buy a Maserati?
      The market type for Maserati thought the ad was pretty good.

      Ads are now done with the understanding that the vast majority of those interested in the product will hop on the internet and explore further.

      The ad increased online searches by 2,143% in the hour after the ad, and 385% overall.

      The star of the ad was Quvenzhane Wallis, the little girl that got so much attention in the movie "Beasts of the Southern Wild".

      I understand what you're saying Shawn...but many of these ads are highly targeted. Those who enjoy driving Ford or Chevrolet may not get the message Maserati was offering.

      Maserati has an aggressive agenda this year. Don't know if the ad will work...only time will tell I guess.

      Don't know if you read Forbes...

      Keep An Eye On Maserati This Year - That Super Bowl Ad Is Just The Beginning - Forbes

      I agree with you on the social media stuff...it's where it's at nowadays.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
      Banned
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post


      But... that Maserati ad... I'm still shaking my head, wondering how that all added up to me wanting to buy a Maserati?
      Resonated with me - I loved it.

      BTW my neighbor parks his new Quattreporte on the street. Already has scratches on the wings. Book price over here? €150k. Beautiful car.
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      • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
        Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

        Resonated with me - I loved it.

        BTW my neighbor parks his new Quattreporte on the street. Already has scratches on the wings. Book price over here? €150k. Beautiful car.
        Damn... you'd think they'd baby that thing.

        I'm gonna have to go back and re-watch all of the ads with an open mind and see if I can put myself as close to the prospect as possible...

        it will be fun to try and find any spots where I can say "yeah, I can see that resonating with so and so...

        After all, it's what we get paid to do...
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