Critique Request, House Painting

40 replies
Hi,

Please critique my copy, attached in pdf in this post.

Muchas Gracias
#critique #house #painting #request
  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    Worst type of positioning, price.

    Next level up would be why he is better.

    Top level would be to inform them of
    the costly mistakes if they get it wrong.

    Other top level positioning is to how to create
    special effects, so a room can be made to look bigger
    or to make the mood setting or which colors match
    existing furniture.

    Those last things are what a woman buyer
    thinks about to enhance her rooms.

    Back to the drawing board I reckon.

    Best,
    Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      Worst type of positioning, price.
      Not if your product is a commodity, and your target group is price shoppers.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        Not if your product is a commodity, and your target group is price shoppers.

        Alex
        Then my question, why would you want to go that route?

        Starbucks took one of the most traded commodity in the world and made something special which people pay a premium for.

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          Then my question, why would you want to go that route?

          Starbucks took one of the most traded commodity in the world and made something special which people pay a premium for.

          Best,
          Ewen
          Not all business owners understand the benefits of differentiation and direct response advertising. If you want to beat your head against the wall trying to convince them, have at it.

          The OP asked for a critique of his copy... not a lesson on alternate business models.

          Alex
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

            Not all business owners understand the benefits of differentiation and direct response advertising. If you want to beat your head against the wall trying to convince them, have at it.

            The OP asked for a critique of his copy... not a lesson on alternate business models.

            Alex
            Yes we don't know whether the poster has had the discussion
            around the implications of the low price strategy and how to apply
            higher pricing through better marketing.

            I certainly would of if it was my client.

            Best,
            Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author GlenH
          There's just so much wrong with that letter.

          But for starters, get completely away from anything to do with price…..

          If you’re going to do a promo, ad. brochure,or sales letter of some sort here are a few thoughts:

          ************


          “Who’s Going To Be Painting Your Home This Time”

          Just about anyone can pick up a paint brush, put on hat, and calls himself a house painter. Well, there’s a huge difference between a ”painter” and a professional painting contractor…

          ************


          Or something simpler..

          “7 Reason Why Your Next Painting Project Will Be the Best You’ve Ever Experienced – Guaranteed.

          <your painting businesses name> professional approach makes all the difference to the end job. Here’s why:

          ***********

          One more thought..

          “Why Can’t I Find a House Painter I Can Trust”

          Then you can list customer testimonials

          ************
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    Never, ever appeal to price shoppers - unless you enjoy getting the life force energy sucked out of your eyeball sockets.

    The copy isn't good. Start over.

    Change the conversation.

    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by maximus242 View Post

    Hi,

    Please critique my copy, attached in pdf in this post.

    Muchas Gracias
    The copy has some good points...
    • an eye-grabbing headline
    • benefits in the first two paragraphs
    • a convenient chart so a home owner can price his own job
    • social proof
    Since the ad states that the company has painted some of the most beautiful homes in Calgary, I don't see a good reason to label it as a start up.

    Also, the wording is awkward is some places.

    And I'd take the word "can" out of the call to action.

    Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    They repair cracks, dents, sand down bumps in the walls, and fill nail holes all free of charge as a part of their special offer.
    ?????? Any good painter does that. Those that don't are bad painters.
    The founder of the company is a classical realist painter who trained in Italy and France studying classical painting. He has formed his new startup
    So now a house-painting mob are called "start-ups"? Don't think so.

    new system of painting they have invented.
    Which is what exactly?

    The founder of the company is a classical realist painter who trained in Italy and France studying classical painting. He has formed his new startup to help finance his artistic passions, and to fulfill his dreams of painting all around the world. Due to this he brings a unique perspective to house painting and design.
    So he's not really a house-painter. He's an amateur artist that's making a bit of money on the side slapping paint on walls. And as soon as he makes enough money he's out of here. So is he going to prep properly? That's the most important part of the whole house-painting thing. How do we know the paint's not going to fall off the walls because Michelangelo hasn't bothered to sand and undercoat properly... because his mind is on travel and old masters?

    How much will the paint cost? What's that got to do with it? Pros buy their paint wholesale. They NEVER break a quote down into "Here's what the paint costs... here's the labor charges." They give you a price on painting your house.




    You have no idea what you're talking about and it shows.


    There are absolutely no redeeming features in this offer or this copy. Dead Duck.
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    • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post


      How much will the paint cost? What's that got to do with it? Pros buy their paint wholesale. They NEVER break a quote down into "Here's what the paint costs... here's the labor charges." They give you a price on painting your house.

      .
      Half of all the clients we get request an itemized bid. And last thing we're gonna tell them is "pro's don't offer itemized bids". Imagine how "professional" that would sound. Its natural for people to want to know what they're paying for. This is sales 101.

      Also, we don't do painting, we do restoration and encapsulation... the latter which is similar to painting. But our paint (encapsulant) costs $250 for 1 - 5 gallon bucket. It has silver in it. And silver makes it very expensive (wholesale), so clients want to know where all that extra money is going. On certain projects we can spend $2,000 just on paint.

      We always start off with 1 price. But when clients ask, which they do quite often, we tell them. We don't hide anything.

      Most importantly, I know quite a few business owners who do over 10 million a year. They're extremely professional. Some have been in business for 40 years. And many of them provide itemized bids. So I don't buy your logic for 1 minute. You do NOT judge the professionalism of an entire company on the sole basis of their contracts.

      -RS
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      • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
        Banned
        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        Half of all the clients we get request an itemized bid. And last thing we're gonna tell them is "pro's don't offer itemized bids". Imagine how "professional" that would sound. Its natural for people to want to know what they're paying for. This is sales 101.

        Also, we don't do painting, we do restoration and encapsulation... the latter which is similar to painting. But our paint (encapsulant) costs $250 for 1 - 5 gallon bucket. It has silver in it. And silver makes it very expensive (wholesale), so clients want to know where all that extra money is going. On certain projects we can spend $2,000 just on paint.

        We always start off with 1 price. But when clients ask, which they do quite often, we tell them. We don't hide anything.

        Most importantly, I know quite a few business owners who do over 10 million a year. They're extremely professional. Some have been in business for 40 years. And many of them provide itemized bids. So I don't buy your logic for 1 minute. You do NOT judge the professionalism of an entire company on the sole basis of their contracts.

        -RS
        Uh huh. Dude - I owned a painting company. Yes - if you're talking "special finish" you might say to the client "This stuff is $200 a can" but breaking it down? Don't make me laugh. And yes - I've been on the brushes. My tag was "painter to the gentry" - always got remarked on with the high-end properties we mainly worked on. "Sales 101" my arse. You're not selling paint - you're selling finish and improving the sales price, preserving the asset - all that. "Sales 101" my friend is "sell the sizzle and not the steak".

        Next.
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        • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
          Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

          Uh huh. Dude - I owned a painting company. Yes - if you're talking "special finish" you might say to the client "This stuff is $200 a can" but breaking it down?
          You just broke it down.

          Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

          Don't make me laugh.
          A teddy bear could make you laugh.

          Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

          And yes - I've been on the brushes. My tag was "painter to the gentry" - always got remarked on with the high-end properties we mainly worked on.
          You must have painted the shit out of those walls. And seriously, who the hell uses brushes anymore? A real painter can do a 1500 SF home in 4 hours with an airless spray gun, + 3 hours for taping and prep work.

          With a brush you're talking about 3 days for the same exact work. The spray gun takes 1/3 the time = 3 times the profit. You get better penetration into pits and crevices, a uniform, thick coating... and much better "remarks". Like, "hey, thanks for not making me smell paint for 3 days straight like the last guy I hired".

          Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

          "Sales 101" my arse. You're not selling paint - you're selling finish and improving the sales price, preserving the asset - all that. "Sales 101" my friend is "sell the sizzle and not the steak".

          Next.
          LMAO. "Preserving the asset"? That sounds awfully close to "hiding your assets". What are you gonna tell me next? That "pros" also cook their books?

          I don't really give a shit about the sizzle OR the steak. What I care about is staying out of court. And I'm not sure where you come from, but in the US, that's a great way to wind up on ABCs "The Lookout" and have the IRS all over your ass.

          So lets be clear. "Pros" do NOT hide their assets. You know who does? Shady, unlicensed, unethical contractors who can't afford to pay an accountant. A real professional accounts for everything. And in accounting (which is what you're doing when you write up a bid) its accepted to slightly "massage" your numbers. Maybe the paint only costs $38 / gallon and you write down $48. Maybe the rollers were $2 and you write down $6. Maybe the labor was $2,000 and you write it up as $2,500. The IRS knows this is common and its very easy for an accountant to explain.

          Whats not so easy to explain is when you have 1 fat # on all your contracts and you can't account for where all that money is going. This is why businesses prefer to pay lawyers for this stuff and not copywriters.

          -RS
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnRussell
            Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

            LMAO. "Preserving the asset"? That sounds awfully close to "hiding your assets". What are you gonna tell me next? That "pros" also cook their books?

            I don't really give a shit about the sizzle OR the steak. What I care about is staying out of court. And I'm not sure where you come from, but in the US, that's a great way to wind up on ABCs "The Lookout" and have the IRS all over your ass.

            So lets be clear. "Pros" do NOT hide their assets. You know who does? Shady, unlicensed, unethical contractors who can't afford to pay an accountant. A real professional accounts for everything. And in accounting (which is what you're doing when you write up a bid) its accepted to slightly "massage" your numbers. Maybe the paint only costs $38 / gallon and you write down $48. Maybe the rollers were $2 and you write down $6. Maybe the labor was $2,000 and you write it up as $2,500. The IRS knows this is common and its very easy for an accountant to explain.

            Whats not so easy to explain is when you have 1 fat # on all your contracts and you can't account for where all that money is going. This is why businesses prefer to pay lawyers for this stuff and not copywriters.

            -RS
            Pretty sure he means preserving their biggest asset - the home.
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          • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
            Banned
            Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post




            LMAO. "Preserving the asset"? That sounds awfully close to "hiding your assets". What are you gonna tell me next? That "pros" also cook their books?

            I don't really give a shit about the sizzle OR the steak. What I care about is staying out of court. And I'm not sure where you come from, but in the US, that's a great way to wind up on ABCs "The Lookout" and have the IRS all over your ass.

            So lets be clear. "Pros" do NOT hide their assets. You know who does? Shady, unlicensed, unethical contractors who can't afford to pay an accountant. A real professional accounts for everything. And in accounting (which is what you're doing when you write up a bid) its accepted to slightly "massage" your numbers. Maybe the paint only costs $38 / gallon and you write down $48. Maybe the rollers were $2 and you write down $6. Maybe the labor was $2,000 and you write it up as $2,500. The IRS knows this is common and its very easy for an accountant to explain.

            Whats not so easy to explain is when you have 1 fat # on all your contracts and you can't account for where all that money is going. This is why businesses prefer to pay lawyers for this stuff and not copywriters.

            -RS
            What on earth are you on about? By "asset" I mean the clients house.

            And "I've been on the brushes" is a saying. Meaning "I've worked as a painter". "Swung a brush" is anothery.
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  • They are able to charge less
    because they can work faster using a new system of painting they have invented.

    This might worry the good people of Calgary (they don't want their houses to be a "test sites") so you must explain this incredible new method in more detail.


    Steve


    P.S. I would also take everyone else's advice and put the new copy (with a couple of ace testimonials) onto a big glossy postcard. Good chance of a quick response and less chance of it being binned.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
    I don't write copy, but here's some pointers for style and better flow.

    1. "They are able to.."


    "This company is able to"—creates more intrigue and is better stylistically. Try not to switch subjects abruptly, ie, shoppers->painting company. Use proper nouns to make it clear who you're talking about, or else be as specific as possible.

    2. "In addition they are.."

    Should be -> "In addition, they are"

    Using a comma after an introductory clause helps with flow, and it's proper grammar.

    This sentence is also a run-on, which hinders flow.

    3. "The offer is available until.."

    Why not, "This is an open-ended offer that could evaporate at any time. Subject to availability."

    Create some urgency.

    4. "The owner of the company.."

    The second instance of "classical" is redundant.

    5. "Due to this..."

    Redundant and wordy.

    6. "The company has painted..."

    Break this sentence down into two separate sentences. The sentence as-is contains two thoughts. It will confuse readers and break flow.

    7. Passive voice

    Try to avoid words like "Being." Passive voice is not actionable.

    8. "In addition they offer a 5 year warranty on the labor for the job."

    Not sure what you're saying here.
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    It starts out in the third person like a press release. Then later you address the reader as "you." Pick one or the other voice and stay with it.

    Flesh out the story of the founder. What's his name? Has he painted anything I have seen? Where? Is he from Calgary? Where did he train in Italy? What's his "journey," meaning what has he gone through to get where he is? Give me some struggle and triumph.

    What is the USP? Is it that he is an artist, so he'll do a better job of recommending color and design? Or is it price?
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    • Profile picture of the author splitTest
      Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

      It starts out in the third person like a press release.
      This. To the O.P., whoever wrote that for you wrote a press release, not a letter. That's the first thing wrong with it.

      And it won't even work well as a press release.
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  • There's also a slight disconnect between a "classical realist painter" and painting a wall for $30.00 (plus the paint).

    It would help if you could errr draw a clearer picture (a good reason why an "artist" would become a "decorator")

    A better one than - he wants to finance his artistic endeavours.

    It's nearly there when you say "brings a unique preceptive to house painting and design"

    Be good to explain how.

    Or as Joe said join all the dots together.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    If your client has no issue competing on price and haggling a bit, you can grab all the painting business you want on Craigslist.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

      You have no idea what you're talking about and it shows.

      There are absolutely no redeeming features in this offer or this copy. Dead Duck.
      That just about says it. From a positioning standpoint, you just had your client walk the plank.

      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      If your client has no issue competing on price and haggling a bit, you can grab all the painting business you can handle on Craigslist.
      Why? Seriously... Why would anyone (like a house painter) want to work with people who don't see their value?

      Back in '06...

      I interviewed some painters to spruce up the two main structures on my old property. I could tell immediately who had the work ethic, insights and proper execution ability - as well as who had organization skills (and who definitely did NOT.)

      In the end...

      I paid $7,000 MORE to hire the people I thought would do the best job.

      I had the property appraised a few weeks later for $650,000 (and we purchased it for $198,000 back in '98.) The excellent paint job was commented on.

      Of course...

      When the bubble burst, the property plummeted in value - all the way down to $240,000. And getting that proved impossible.

      Anyway...

      Don't play the commodity game.

      You have an even playing field and can focus on any number of benefits that other house painters totally drop the ball in communicating (like you did in your current piece.)

      Mark
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

        Why? Seriously... Why would anyone (like a house painter) want to work with people who don't see their value?
        Because they just want the money. The only question is whether the job is worth their time.
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

          Because they just want the money. The only question is whether the job is worth their time.
          Here's the problem with needing (or wanting) money...

          If you don't charge enough, your intention is to get the job done ASAP - even if it means doing a less than perfect job.

          However...

          When you position yourself to reach higher end clients, you get paid more, do a better job, command a mightier rep... and have the authority to book yourself out.

          Sound familiar copywriters?

          Mark

          P.S. I agree... They want money. The question is... Do you think it's worth it to forsake more money in the future... for less money right now? Pick your poison. You Rick command fees in the upper echelon because you've positioned yourself to be the best. Your copy converts... and your reputation says just that. People would be smart to follow your lead - whether it's painting... or writing copy.
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          • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
            Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

            P.S. I agree... They want money. The question is... Do you think it's worth it to forsake more money in the future... for less money right now? Pick your poison. You Rick command fees in the upper echelon because you've positioned yourself to be the best. Your copy converts... and your reputation says just that. People would be smart to follow your lead - whether it's painting... or writing copy.
            Mark, Here's what I know: I know I don't have all the facts of the matter.

            Let me put it to you this way. In the last two years, I have worked with 4 clients in the trades. Depending upon their situation, the marketing is different.

            So I'm not going to presume anything. I'm not going to impose my values on them.

            Sometimes, and I sensed this while reading his letter, marketing is about putting food on the table. Not necessarily building a business that attracts a specific clientle.

            And if that's the case, he could be reeling them in on craigslist. It ain't pretty by any means. But you learn very quickly what matters to a painting prospect and you're able to adjust your marketing accordingly.

            I hope this clarifies.

            - Rick Duris

            PS: I'm sure you understand this. The home improvement industry IS price sensitive. There's a reason Lowe's and Home Depot are eating the helpful hardware man's lunch (Ace Hardware).
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            • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
              Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

              Sometimes, and I sensed this while reading his letter, marketing is about putting food on the table. Not necessarily building a business that attracts a specific clientle.

              And if that's the case, he could be reeling them in on craigslist. It ain't pretty by any means. But you learn very quickly what matters to a painting prospect and you're able to adjust your marketing accordingly.
              You're absolutely right. I sensed the same thing... because I've been there.

              What's that Oreo analogy? One Oreo now... or three Oreos later?

              I know it's difficult to focus on later - when you NEED money NOW to pay the bills today...

              ...AND there should always be long term thinking in any piece.

              But I'll just say, yes, you're right. Because you are.

              Mark
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              • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
                Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

                I know it's difficult to focus on later - when you NEED money NOW to pay the bills today...

                ...AND there should always be long term thinking in any piece.

                But I'll just say, yes, you're right. Because you are.

                Mark
                Thanks. I was expecting a fight.

                I was talking to one guy, a mason. He was stuck on Craigslist. Couldn't migrate off.

                Had his contractor license revoked. Had to always deal in cash. Frozen bank accounts. Owed the state tens of thousands.

                (All as a result of getting caught in the 2008 real estate crash.)

                It stuck in his craw he was so good at his work, but stuck doing small 1-2 day jobs on Craigslist.

                You can bet a long term marketing game plan was always on his mind.

                But man, he could really close folks on Craigslist.

                - Rick Duris
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  • Wait a minute.

    Copywriters employing decorators? Property values at $650,000?

    It won't do.

    We have to live in attics, overlooking the rooftops. So we can burn the midnight oil undisturbed by any noise.

    Wooden floors and brick walls.

    No need for any extravagance (apart from the occasional tin of varnish and a brush).


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Wait a minute.

      Copywriters employing decorators? Property values at $650,000?

      It won't do.

      We have to live in attics, overlooking the rooftops. So we can burn the midnight oil undisturbed by any noise.

      Wooden floors and brick walls.

      No need for any extravagance (apart from the occasional tin of varnish and a brush).


      Steve
      True, true...

      How's this...

      Late last year, my presence was requested at a San Francisco office by an IT company I wrote copy for. (On a side note... I'm never, EVER writing IT copy again. EVER! Did I say ever?)

      I was kind of down in the dumps... just not excited by life. Nothing was particularly wrong. Money was good... doing lots of cooking... drinking good wine and bourbon... but I was just kinda void.

      Anyway...

      I arrived at the San Francisco office in Birkenstocks, a ripped pair of jeans, a rockin' beard... and a couple of dark circles under my eyes from being slightly hungover and sleep deprived.

      Mind you, I don't subscribe to the notion that I need to look or act a certain way to make people money. Mark don't play that game.

      I definitely got a lot of looks. These are people who are all gorgeous (women AND men)... and dress to the nines...

      But I was confident in the copy I produced (which is working) - so I saw no reason to change my appearance to make them more comfortable with my presence.

      Is that emo enough?

      Mark
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  • Mark...sort of...

    Obviously we were all told that the "official" writers uniform is - (and there can be no exceptions).

    White T shirt (or button white shirt for special occasions)

    Jeans (it used to be levi's but any pair you feel comfortable in)

    Trainers (best to be Nike)

    Leather jacket or blazer is optional.

    For harsh weather a 3/4 length woollen coat.


    Steve


    P.S. Hangovers are an occupational hazard.

    Usually single malt scotch (from the Isle of Islay, tastes like smoked bark, wrapped in seaweed and drenched in TCP* a very acquired taste) drunk to excess when celebrating with the clients.


    * TCP no idea what the USA equivalent is I'm hoping it is TCP.
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  • Profile picture of the author maximus242
    Thanks for the feedback everyone, taking it all into consideration, and will post a new concept soon. As for why it is written as a press release, its an old tactic to get more readership. People read articles much more than they read advertisements. The hardest job in advertising is to get it read.

    As for why they are competing on price its not a long term strategy, just a way to build up more testimonials and proof elements so they can further establish credibility. This is not a long term marketing strategy, its more about getting penetration into the market then establishing a usp once we see what people are responding to.

    Using customer feedback we are going to get information on what (aside from price) they find most compelling about the service. Then build a new ad around that along with proof elements from the survey to create a corner in the market for them.

    With a USP we know customers are responding to along with proof (from the customers) I think we can build a fairly compelling campaign.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by maximus242 View Post

      As for why they are competing on price its not a long term strategy, just a way to build up more testimonials and proof elements so they can further establish credibility. This is not a long term marketing strategy, its more about getting penetration into the market then establishing a usp once we see what people are responding to.
      Then create an irresistible campaign and offer around this premise.

      Build up enough value to charge infinitely more than you're asking (or the client's asking...) and drop the lower price - with some pre-qualifying and REAL scarcity. How many low-paying jobs can they honestly do, huh?

      The point is...

      You still need to write the copy to appeal to high-end customers. You're just shocking prospects with a too-good-to-be-true... limited time offer... for the first 10 people.

      Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author splitTest
      Originally Posted by maximus242 View Post

      As for why it is written as a press release, its an old tactic to get more readership.
      That tactic (making an ad look like an article) works with ads.

      I was under the impression that this copy was intended as a direct-mail letter. :confused:

      If it's a letter, much better to go with personable letter-styled copy.

      Speaking of press releases, the stuff about the founder being a classical painter who formed the start-up to finance his artistic passions might get you local media coverage that could serve you well. You might want to do an actual press release around that angle...
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    A good hard-hitting series of Before and Afters may work better than anything. With...photos of the same property 5 years after - "5 years after and still looking good". Tag it with something. Maybe riff on the Rolls Royce "Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten".
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Maximus,

    Please, please, please understand, selling painting services via direct mail is futile. I think that's what you're trying to do.

    Cut to the chase: What you want to do is generate leads.

    So what's the best, easiest way to get the phone to ring?

    - Rick Duris

    PS: Also, remember the concept of the moving parade. Most times people don't need painting done. But then they do. Your job is to be there when they do.

    PPS: I don't know what this says, but I like the imagery.

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  • Yes Rick is right.

    And one way to be there when they do need a painter is with regular Postcards (the more you remind them about decorating the more they'll notice the marks on the walls).

    Try a clip or a magnet on the cards, so they can hang them up or stick them on the fridge (even better if they use them to cover any cracks on the plaster).

    Also when do most people need their house painted?

    When they are selling it.

    When they have just bought it.

    Or before Christmas (or any major holiday season) so the family and guests aren't shocked at the state of the rooms.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post


      Also when do most people need their house painted?

      When they are selling it.

      When they have just bought it.

      Or before Christmas (or any major holiday season) so the family and guests aren't shocked at the state of the rooms.
      I noticed a LOT of people get their home renovated when they're thinking about taking out a second. Jack up the value - before appraisal.

      Marcello Francesco
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Thanks, Steve. Targeted postcards based upon the moving parade principle are extremely effective.

    - Rick Duris
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Even Picasso used plain old house paint.

    Picasso’s Masterpieces Made With House Paint
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/sc...-say.html?_r=0
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    Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
    - Jack Trout
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    I agree with the other posters. You don't need all this copy, especially not if price is your angle. If you have extra room in your ad, post a bunch of testimonials. Every blue collar type service business I've worked with has gotten the most traction by beefing up their reviews and using them in their ads.
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  • Getting the blue collar market to respond is relatively easy.

    (there are more bc's than wc's - that didn't quite type the way I thought it would)

    Anyway...

    Tell the Blue Collar's how they are robbed blind by higher prices.

    And how and why that they'll get much better decorating with your people.

    For a lot less money.


    Steve
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