Questions for Copywriters and Marketers.

13 replies
Hello Everyone,

I have read this forum for many years and finally thought I'd join the conversation. Here is a bit about myself:
  • I have sold 8 digits doing e-commerce on eBay and Amazon over the years.
  • I suffer from depression.
I'm not sure if it's just because of my health condition that I find e-commerce of physical goods to be a total drain of energy. The picking, packing, shipping, and customer service tends to take quite a bit out of you. In order to manage my depression over the years I would wind up a website to sell products but eventually I didn't have the strength to keep up with it. Managing the site's as they grew bigger just required so much attention that I felt I was totally attached at the hip to it. I had a couple of 20k per day sale days on eBay and hit 250k in a month a few times in sales. It might sound great but it took a pile of energy to do that.


Perhaps I think the grass is greener here on the other side of the fence selling digital products and that may be just my fantasy. Perhaps there is just as much customer interaction and effort that goes into digital sales as does physical goods. So I'm here to ask you guys with all your experience to possibly share with me. I'm open to do the same with you if you have any e-commerce questions.


Before I ask these questions I would like to share with you my goal. I would like to make 2-5k per month within 6-8 months of work selling Kindle eBooks. I don't think I can compile an "Act Now" or "But Wait There's More" type of product by myself.


I know this isn't terribly original but my thoughts were to hire ghostwriters and publish Kindle ebooks acting like a contractor. I was hoping over 2 years time to be able to publish around 100-200 of these books and to build relationships with some writers to make this happen. Here are my questions:


1. Is it against Amazon Terms to have multiple publisher accounts? I suppose you could do like 5-10 cookbooks under 1 name but for smaller niches maybe like 1-3 e-books would seem reasonable under 1 pen name.



2. If all of the content was well written would I just lose credibility if I were all over the map with different topics? Is it possible to manage this all under 1 account and 1 pen name?


3. If I must manage under different accounts do I have to do crazy things like VPN connections to the my other publisher accounts? What do you recommend for managing a kindle library of 100 titles on a variety of topics in regards to pen names?



4. What would be a reasonable budget per book from let's say 22-40 pages? If you would kindly quote a range that would be great. Also do the copywriters charge for images separate if there are any illustrations that need to be included? Is it possible to have a library of 100 books with little or no illustration at all?



5. If all your writings are original from ghostwriters and you pass CopyScape what are the chances that Amazon will flag your book? Is there anything in their criteria like the range of topics you are covering, the voice and tone of the writing, that would tip them off and have you being labeled as a marketer?


6. Do you think that you can build a library of 100 books for between 5-10k to achieve a minimum income of 2k monthly? What would you recommend in order to achieve this?


7. From your experience do you believe I should limit my ghostwriting efforts to non-fiction or fiction exclusively? Should I concentrate on one or would a mixture be acceptable?



My biggest concern is as the library grows that I would have problems publishing additional titles and passing Amazon's review process. I suppose my angle would be to create good relationships with good ghostwriters/copywriters and selecting topics and outlines. I was planning on using PLR to get general ideas on outlines and editing them. After the eBook was returned from the ghostwriter/copywriter I would add/edit them as I saw fit.


I suppose I'd really be like acting like a contractor in order to achieve all of this. Since you guys here are Warrior Forum are in the heat of the battle I was hoping for your thoughts and suggestions. I read about squeeze pages, funnels, email marketing, maintaining a blog etc and don't think I have it in my to create such things. I would like my Kindle eBooks to bring some value to the reader and was wondering if you would share your honest thoughts about the approach I would like to take.


I suppose I'm going to get alot of 'it's all in my ebook' responses but perhaps someone could answer these questions more specifically. My first book I would like to write would be an info book on suppliers for eBay and Amazon where I have the most knowledge and I believe would be useful to others. I suppose I could do a small series on this myself but I think I would run out of material on that eventually and would like to employ other writers to put together content for me.


Thank you all for your input and time in helping me to address these questions. My depression is cyclical and managing my energy can be difficult. It affects my relationships and my life overall but I have learned to live with this crutch and e-commerce and online selling has helped me since I don't think I could deal with a boss and a 9-5 job. I really feel stuck with e-commerce and tied to it and feel that digital goods if properly done might offer some sort of residual income for a good initial effort. But if I put together a 'Best Crockpot Recipes' book that is truly original I don't want to have to wrestle with if Amazon will take it or not. Amazon steals already 15% or more of my total energy and God knows I would not be happy if I employed a real ghostwriter and put all this work into 1 title only to get smacked down by the Amazon Gods. They once put a hold on 45k from me and almost put me in my grave so I prefer less stress if I can achieve it.


Thank you again for reading this post and I really look forward to your honest commenting and what you have to say. You may be brutally honest and if you do offer quality ghostwriting services I would like to start building some relationships and I ask that you send me a PM.


Thanks everyone.


Sincerely,


TdJames
#copywriters #ebooks #kindle ebooks #marketers #questions
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by tdjames View Post


    I suppose I'm going to get alot of 'it's all in my ebook' responses but perhaps someone could answer these questions more specifically.
    Actually, no. My question is...

    Originally Posted by tdjames View Post


    I have sold 8 digits doing e-commerce on eBay and Amazon over the years.
    Why not take some of that 8 digits and hire a coach? On second thought, where's YOUR ebook on how to make millions online?

    Seriously, what am I missing?
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    • Profile picture of the author tdjames
      Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

      Why not take some of that 8 digits and hire a coach? On second thought, where's YOUR ebook on how to make millions online?

      Seriously, what am I missing?
      Hello,

      Your not missing anything. Selling 8 digits over a course of time is difficult. Managing staff, managing vendors, programmers, virtual staff, and logistics it's quite a challenge.

      I suppose I could write about it all and my personal experiences. The software I used, the methods I employed, and suppliers. There are many eBooks on every topic available and I suppose I'd have to use some unique approach.

      I think it would read more like a story than anything else with tips included. Things for people to consider before they go down this road.

      I know how to sell physical e-commerce goods and am trying to move into digital products. Again my idea was simply to create a catalog of Kindle eBooks and I was hoping for some input to see if my goals and approaches listed here are reasonable considering a full-time effort and some investment capital.

      Thank you for taking the time to post.

      Sincerely,

      TdJames
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      • I just wanted to take a minute to give you a piece of advice...

        A Kindle catalog is not the way to go to make money selling digital products.
        Originally Posted by tdjames View Post


        I know how to sell physical e-commerce goods and am trying to move into digital products. Again my idea was simply to create a catalog of Kindle eBooks and I was hoping for some input to see if my goals and approaches listed here are reasonable considering a full-time effort and some investment capital.

        Thank you for taking the time to post.

        Sincerely,

        TdJames
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        • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
          Originally Posted by MontelloMarketing View Post

          I just wanted to take a minute to give you a piece of advice...

          A Kindle catalog is not the way to go to make money selling digital products.
          Agreed.

          Shippable information products or membership site subscriptions where the person can't just ask for a refund to steal the product have worked best for me.

          I do, however, have multiple kindle books published and only one of them has me as the author. Not sure if it's the same with printed books.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lance K
    If you want to go the Kindle publishing route, check out this WSO by Goeff Shaw.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/warrior-...save-70-a.html
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
    I'm a bit pressed for time today but I'll answer as many of your questions as I quickly can.

    Originally Posted by tdjames View Post

    Here are my questions:


    1. Is it against Amazon Terms to have multiple publisher accounts? I suppose you could do like 5-10 cookbooks under 1 name but for smaller niches maybe like 1-3 e-books would seem reasonable under 1 pen name.
    Last time I checked you can have three pen names per Amazon Kindle account.


    2. If all of the content was well written would I just lose credibility if I were all over the map with different topics? Is it possible to manage this all under 1 account and 1 pen name?
    It's not that you'd lose credibility. You'd lose readability. In terms of non-fiction, most people prefer the book is focused on one topic or several closely related topics. The exception might be an autobiography or biography.

    I don't recommend putting everything under one pen name.

    3. If I must manage under different accounts do I have to do crazy things like VPN connections to the my other publisher accounts? What do you recommend for managing a kindle library of 100 titles on a variety of topics in regards to pen names?
    To date, I haven't worked with any other publishing accounts except Kindle and Createspace. Both of those are owned by Amazon so they connect together pretty well.

    Most authors I've met tend to log into each publishing account (i.e. Kindle, Barnes & Noble, GooglePlay, etc) to check their stats for that platform.

    Re: 100 titles. Establish three pen names to handle your 100 titles. Readers will look for similar titles for a pen name that they enjoyed. They rarely look for non-similar titles done by an author (i.e. mystery novels written under the same pen name as a motivational novel writer)

    In other words, I recommend one pen name per genre. I also recommend developing a series in your genre. Fiction series are pretty obvious so let give you a non-fiction example. In cooking niche you could have a series of books where each one covers a different ethnic type of cooking. If someone looks for "Jack Jones Cooking" then all of your Kindle cooking books should turn up in their Amazon search.

    4. What would be a reasonable budget per book from let's say 22-40 pages? If you would kindly quote a range that would be great. Also do the copywriters charge for images separate if there are any illustrations that need to be included? Is it possible to have a library of 100 books with little or no illustration at all?
    No clue. Most copywriters, including me, writing marketing. They don't ghostwrite books. You'll need a content writer or ghostwriter for that task.

    5. If all your writings are original from ghostwriters and you pass CopyScape what are the chances that Amazon will flag your book? Is there anything in their criteria like the range of topics you are covering, the voice and tone of the writing, that would tip them off and have you being labeled as a marketer?
    If it's 100% original and there's no objectionable content (based on Amazon's TOS), then you should be fine.

    6. Do you think that you can build a library of 100 books for between 5-10k to achieve a minimum income of 2k monthly? What would you recommend in order to achieve this?
    IF you research your topics correctly, then you shouldn't need to publish 100 books to create a steady minimum income of $2K monthly.

    7. From your experience do you believe I should limit my ghostwriting efforts to non-fiction or fiction exclusively? Should I concentrate on one or would a mixture be acceptable?
    Depends on your interests and what ghostwriters you opt to hire. As a general rule, fiction tends to outsell non-fiction on Kindle. Having said that, there are non-fiction books that hit the best seller lists every day.


    My biggest concern is as the library grows that I would have problems publishing additional titles and passing Amazon's review process. I suppose my angle would be to create good relationships with good ghostwriters/copywriters and selecting topics and outlines. I was planning on using PLR to get general ideas on outlines and editing them. After the eBook was returned from the ghostwriter/copywriter I would add/edit them as I saw fit.
    I don't recommend using PLR at all for Kindle books. It's more likely to get flagged and get your account perma-banned. If your Kindle book is 100% original and doesn't violate Amazon Kindle's TOS (i.e. publishing a book about kiddie porn) then you should be in good standing with Amazon.

    Hope that helps,

    Mike

    P.S. There's a lot to learn about Kindle publishing. I recommend joining Geoff Shaw's Kindling program to learn a lot of the ins and out.. You can find it by doing a search in the WSO section of this forum.
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    • Profile picture of the author tdjames
      Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

      I'm a bit pressed for time today but I'll answer as many of your questions as I quickly can.



      Last time I checked you can have three pen names per Amazon Kindle account.




      It's not that you'd lose credibility. You'd lose readability. In terms of non-fiction, most people prefer the book is focused on one topic or several closely related topics. The exception might be an autobiography or biography.

      I don't recommend putting everything under one pen name.



      To date, I haven't worked with any other publishing accounts except Kindle and Createspace. Both of those are owned by Amazon so they connect together pretty well.

      Most authors I've met tend to log into each publishing account (i.e. Kindle, Barnes & Noble, GooglePlay, etc) to check their stats for that platform.

      Re: 100 titles. Establish three pen names to handle your 100 titles. Readers will look for similar titles for a pen name that they enjoyed. They rarely look for non-similar titles done by an author (i.e. mystery novels written under the same pen name as a motivational novel writer)

      In other words, I recommend one pen name per genre. I also recommend developing a series in your genre. Fiction series are pretty obvious so let give you a non-fiction example. In cooking niche you could have a series of books where each one covers a different ethnic type of cooking. If someone looks for "Jack Jones Cooking" then all of your Kindle cooking books should turn up in their Amazon search.



      No clue. Most copywriters, including me, writing marketing. They don't ghostwrite books. You'll need a content writer or ghostwriter for that task.



      If it's 100% original and there's no objectionable content (based on Amazon's TOS), then you should be fine.



      IF you research your topics correctly, then you shouldn't need to publish 100 books to create a steady minimum income of $2K monthly.



      Depends on your interests and what ghostwriters you opt to hire. As a general rule, fiction tends to outsell non-fiction on Kindle. Having said that, there are non-fiction books that hit the best seller lists every day.




      I don't recommend using PLR at all for Kindle books. It's more likely to get flagged and get your account perma-banned. If your Kindle book is 100% original and doesn't violate Amazon Kindle's TOS (i.e. publishing a book about kiddie porn) then you should be in good standing with Amazon.

      Hope that helps,

      Mike

      P.S. There's a lot to learn about Kindle publishing. I recommend joining Geoff Shaw's Kindling program to learn a lot of the ins and out.. You can find it by doing a search in the WSO section of this forum.
      Hello,

      Thanks so much for your response. It was kind of you to share your experience with me. I suppose there is lots to learn. I did spend some time looking around before I posted and read up on Geoff's offering for the kindle publishing group.

      I have made a living distributing branded products in e-commerce and perhaps I should start with what I know about. There is so much junk about eBay selling and some of these books are like 300 pages long. I do have in the trenches experience and have sold 8 digits on these marketplaces but cannot see myself putting together a 300 page book on this. I mean even with all that I have learned through the years I could condense that down to like 50-75 pages max which is either sad or else the other people in this niche have a ton of non-sense filler content that is really generic.

      I'm fairly practical and I'm wondering if there is a market for non-fiction writing based on research and trial by fire experience. If I had to write a romance novel I would be dead in the water but if I were to share my e-commerce methodology perhaps I would be more successful.

      I just wonder if there are more writers that write for the niche even if it's not really what they are into just for the sake of an income vs. people who write what they know and have experience doing. I suppose if you write what you love you'd being doing yourself the biggest favor but possibly not paying the bills. I mean I love to write poetry but I'm not sure if people really buy that as often.

      I suppose the best thing to do is just write one and learn along the way. That is how I learned e-commerce and I hope that my learning curve would be good with this. I think I just would like to scale out of e-commerce and try to make a successful transition. I feel that there is more of a community with writers than being an e-commerce business owner.

      I have tried to review all of your websites for everyone who has posted here
      and Seth I must say I did review your Sales Funnel software. God that seems like a truly massive undertaking and I take my hat off to you because it seems you have studied so much the emotional science it takes to lead people into a sale. Selling physical goods that are already branded do not take this much effort but on the other hand the margins are lower and the profit is most likely less. The upfront mental capital must be much more in the eBook and content business with promise of great margins and reselling the same thing over and over assuming it stays relevant.

      Thanks again for those who have posted here.

      Sincerely,

      TdJames
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      • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
        Originally Posted by tdjames View Post

        I mean even with all that I have learned through the years I could condense that down to like 50-75 pages max which is either sad or else the other people in this niche have a ton of non-sense filler content that is really generic.
        There is nothing wrong with tight writing, so long as your audience GETS it.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    This is not the section for this. You would be much better served going to the Kindle Forum - http://www.warriorforum.com/warrior-...brainstorming/
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  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    Answering only one of your questions I have to say that fiction books are for artists. You won't be able to really evaluate their quality.

    An excellent writer won't write excellent books for someone else.

    Now, I would like to tell you something I understood about the Kindle marketplace.

    If you want to be successful with Kindle books you need a group of reviewers who will write positive reviews when your book will get a one-star review written by one of your competitors or by someone bribed by them. Amazon doesn’t delete negative reviews in order to force all authors to cover the negative ones with positive reviews. This is why you find so many contradictory ‘opinions’ when you read the reviews of the same book, especially if it is a best seller.

    Amazon likes this movement because this way the site sells more books. So, if you don't have many friends and relatives willing to help you with reviews, you have to find reviewers. Don't wait for the last minute because exactly when you will start selling a good book, it will be bombarded by negative reviews and the sales will stop.

    You have to cover the negative ones, which remain at the top when many people find them ‘helpful’. So, you need a group also to put down the negative reviews by clicking on ‘not helpful’ under them. Don't use Fiverr because Amazon will discover it and delete your reviews. Amazon pretends to be honest and pursue those who try to game the system… But it lets anyone write reviews…

    I stopped caring about Kindle books when I understood what happens in their marketplace. However, most authors get adapted to their system. Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnRussell
    You've made 8 figures?

    Hire somebody to ghostwrite a course on how to make 8 figures on Ebay.

    Hire a real copywriter to write the promotion for you.

    Try and get Jim Cockrum to promote it for you.

    Collect cash.
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    • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
      If your core motivation is to get out of shipping high quantities of low-margin goods and get into a business with fewer hassles but also high earning potential, I do not recommend Kindle, especially if you want to publish nonfiction rather than fiction. This is a digital marketplace that is also low-margin, and you will need to generate high sales to have high steady income.

      There is another option, which is a high-margin business that requires way fewer customers to make a lot of money. Choose a customer segment and create a system of genuinely useful information products for those customers, ranging from free to $29.95 to $97 to $2995 or more. Generate traffic and move people through the funnel. There is much less competition to deal with, less trial and error required than with Kindle and great longterm earning potential.

      Let me know if you want to know more.

      Marcia Yudkin
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      Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Are you throwing the baby out with the bath water
        by not considering fulfillment companies
        like Amazon?

        You could be just a few tweaks away from very profitable
        while your time isn't sucked out of you.

        Food for thought.

        Best,
        Ewen
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