Growing Problem: How Do You Fight "Guarantee Blindness"?

30 replies
I've heard of ad blindness and banner blindness. But I just read how one of the fastest growing problems marketers are having now is "Guarantee Blindness".

Here's the Article

How do you fight guarantee blindness?
Do you see it as problem?
Is the bar raising, staying the same or degressing? In your opinion.

Thanks for your input.
#fight #growing #guarantee blindness #problem
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by The Niche Man View Post

    I've heard of ad blindness and banner blindness. But I just read how one of the fastest growing problems marketers are having now is "Guarantee Blindness".

    Here's the Article

    How do you fight guarantee blindness?
    Do you see it as problem?
    Is the bar raising, staying the same or degressing? In your opinion.

    Thanks for your input.
    You know, I was JUST writing about this yesterday.

    This is a real problem in the IM niche. So many people offering a money back guarantee, it's not even something you offer anymore....the buyer feels entitled to it.

    I think the solution is:

    1. Making the "safety net" really outrageous.

    For example, I don't promise people their money back, I promise to make up for their time too, by mailing them a check for $100, or promising a 500% refund in the form of a personally mailed check (example: The 24 Hour Marketing Miracle: The FIRST...The 24 Hour Marketing Miracle: The FIRST... )

    2. Having a HOOK attached to the guarantee.

    A "Reason why..." something that allows you to tell a story which reveals what kind of person you are....what values you stand for and WHY you're making the offer. Dan Kennedy has a great example of this in his "cardboard submarine" story in "Trust Based Marketing."

    Outrageous Marketing Amazon.com: Outrageous Advertising That's...Amazon.com: Outrageous Advertising That's... ...has a couple great ones too.

    ...anyway, good topic. Be interesting to see other people's comments on it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    You know, in my past products I never put a guarantee on my pages. Yes it probably hurt my sales but I still made sales anyways!

    Interesting read, and I especially like the point about the guarantee being placed at the top and not the bottom of the page. That was insightful for sure!

    Thanks for sharing the article!
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    • Profile picture of the author CurtisSlone
      Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

      You know, in my past products I never put a guarantee on my pages. Yes it probably hurt my sales but I still made sales anyways!

      Interesting read, and I especially like the point about the guarantee being placed at the top and not the bottom of the page. That was insightful for sure!

      Thanks for sharing the article!
      There is hardly ever a need to put a money back guarantee on anything except on satisfaction. It's our jobs to fulfill needs not over compensate for making a wrong decision or the possibility of even doing so.
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      • Profile picture of the author wordwizard
        Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

        Here's another little tip.

        You don't really want to guarantee they won't be disappointed.

        In order for a person to process that statement, neurologically speaking, they actually have to feel what it's like to be disappointed first.

        It's not exactly something you want people to experience in a sales letter. :

        Rather, guarantee they'll feel good about something.

        - Rick Duris

        PS: As all the self help books say, focus on what you want. Not what you don't want.
        Great points, Rick. I just rewrote one of my clients' copy that was filled with things like "You won't regret this" and, yes, "I guarantee you won't be disappointed." And for the exact reasons you're giving!

        To me, it suggests regret and disappointment, and I want my readers to stay far away from that kind of thinking.
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  • I've always liked the Lands' End (the clothing peoples) guarantee - everything is guaranteed for life.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    First of all, I know guarantee blindness exists. I've seen it in eye tracking studies. It's obvious.

    But consider this.

    Guarantee blindness might not necessarily be bad. In fact, it might be an indication the rest of your copy is doing its job.

    Why do I say that?

    Well, why would someone read the guarantee?

    Because they have doubts and concerns. So much so, they're they want to see what their options are if your product or service doesn't live up to its promises.

    So, if they're not reading your guarantee, if they gloss over it, it may just mean they're not concerned about you fulfilling your promises.

    The reason I say this is I've seen 3 heatmaps lately where the vast majority of the page is lit up like a Christmas tree. But the entire guarantee section is dark. These were very profitable offers.

    Might be a good sign.

    - Rick Duris
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      I've seen where the guarantee symbol has been made clickable
      which leads to a pop up window explaining in more detail what the guarantee
      entails, drop the shopping cart abandonment rate by half.

      Double the conversion in other words.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author GlenH
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I've seen where the guarantee symbol has been made clickable
        which leads to a pop up window explaining in more detail what the guarantee
        entails, drop the shopping cart abandonment rate by half.

        Double the conversion in other words.

        Best,
        Ewen
        That's' amazing....

        I've never heard of that strategy before. And have never seen an example in action.

        The idea is a clever one, and clearly well work testing.

        Was it just a simple guarantee graphic which was just subtly clickable, or was it a guarantee graphic that had some sort of pointed focus instructing the reader to click the graphic to read the guarantee popup.
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I've seen where the guarantee symbol has been made clickable
        which leads to a pop up window explaining in more detail what the guarantee
        entails, drop the shopping cart abandonment rate by half.

        Double the conversion in other words.

        Best,
        Ewen
        Yeah, I've seen that and I've experienced that as a customer.

        What they're trying to do is HIDE the guarantee.

        Years ago, I bought some posters online. When I ordered, I wasn't paying attention to the guarantee. Glossed right over it.

        Even when I wanted a refund, I still couldn't find how to take advantage of the guarantee. I saw the word/phrase, but the details were never explained. It was because I had to mouse over the actual word "guarantee" and then click on it to see the details.

        They made the guarantee totally blend into the page. It was their way of reducing refunds.

        Sneaky. Right up there with forced continuity.

        - Rick Duris
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    • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      First of all, I know guarantee blindness exists. I've seen it in eye tracking studies. It's obvious.

      But consider this.

      Guarantee blindness might not necessarily be bad. In fact, it might be an indication the rest of your copy is doing its job.

      Why do I say that?

      Well, why would someone read the guarantee?

      Because they have doubts and concerns. So much so, they're they want to see what their options are if your product or service doesn't live up to its promises.

      So, if they're not reading your guarantee, if they gloss over it, it may just mean they're not concerned about you fulfilling your promises.

      The reason is say this is I've seen 3 heatmaps lately where the vast majority of the page is lit up like a Christmas tree. But the entire guarantee section is dark. These were very profitable offers.

      Might be a good sign.

      - Rick Duris
      That's really interesting.

      Frankly,I haven't bought anything because of a guarantee in years.

      If I'm that worried, I don't buy it.

      But...I remember a time when I used to be persuaded by them...and I remember why.

      Looking back, it had nothing to do with the product and everything to do with my own fear that I was somehow "special," and that it wouldn't work for me.

      Personally, I've found that to be the biggest objection to overcome when selling in person too...the prospect's own insecurity about whether the product will work for them.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

        That's really interesting.

        Frankly,I haven't bought anything because of a guarantee in years.

        If I'm that worried, I don't buy it.

        But...I remember a time when I used to be persuaded by them...and I remember why.

        Looking back, it had nothing to do with the product and everything to do with my own fear that I was somehow "special," and that it wouldn't work for me.

        Personally, I've found that to be the biggest objection to overcome when selling in person too...the prospect's own insecurity about whether the product will work for them.
        In a 10,000 person survey to buyers of printing, the no.1 criteria to buying was whether they felt the seller was trustworthy.

        What we can take from this is it depends on the level of sophistication
        of your buyers.

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          In a 10,000 person survey to buyers of printing, the no.1 criteria to buying was whether they felt the seller was trustworthy.

          What we can take from this is it depends on the level of sophistication
          of your buyers.

          Best,
          Ewen
          You know, level of personal sophistication is a damn big deal.

          I think that's why a lot of these IM copywriters get stuck in the silo of writing WSO copy. What works for the average WSO buyer looks like Carnival Barking to the people spending boatloads of money on high end services.

          But I do wonder about some of those surveys....

          Would a person have the self-awareness (and the balls to admit) that the real objection was their own personal insecurity? Blaming the seller IS a damn convenient scapegoat.

          Vance Packard's book "The Hidden Persuaders" has dozens of examples of this unintended misdirection on the part of the consumer.

          It's an interesting read for a copywriter. Has dozens of examples where survey's that asked the question directly didn't get to the real core of what the buyer wanted. They had to call in psychologists to construct tests that were designed to indirectly glean the information about what the consumers wanted. Some of the sales increases in the case studies are impressive.

          I think it's wise to find out the reader's hidden "fear barriers" and address them in the copy without sounding like some odd cross between Yoda and Dr. Phil. Just sayin.'
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post


            It's an interesting read for a copywriter. Has dozens of examples where survey's that asked the question directly didn't get to the real core of what the buyer wanted. They had to call in psychologists to construct tests that were designed to indirectly glean the information about what the consumers wanted. Some of the sales increases in the case studies are impressive.

            I think it's wise to find out the reader's hidden "fear barriers" and address them in the copy without sounding like some odd cross between Yoda and Dr. Phil. Just sayin.'
            True about the gaping gap between what people say they will do to what they actually do.

            The fun part is peeling off the layers like an onion,
            till you get to the real tipping point which lead people to take action.

            And if you go back to a point in time where the decision to change
            was made without influence from a marketer.

            Knowing that and using it as an entry to the conversation with this self motivated person,
            you have a frictionless encounter.

            The conversation is no longer about why a person should change,
            which is mostly a wasted exercise anyway, it's how to maximize the
            opportunity moving forward. The prospect sees what we are saying as being totally relevant. And if you are seen as relevant then the prospect passes trust on to you
            as the person who must know how to help.

            Great cono.

            Best,
            Ewen
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            • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
              Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

              And if you go back to a point in time where the decision to change
              was made without influence from a marketer.
              When exactly might that have been?

              "In the beginning..."

              ...nah, not early enough.

              Snakes selling apples.
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        • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
          Speaking for me personally, as a consumer, unless I see an "All Sales Final or No Refunds" sign ... I just assume the product is guaranteed.

          But if it's a service or consumable product I'll at least give the guarantee a glance so I know what my boundaries are.

          If used wisely, it seems like a guarantee is a good selling point tool to push the skeptical and on-the-fence buyer over the edge - rather than just a legal obligation.

          When I see a standard guarantee I think ... "So what?" A radical guarantee does get my attention, it doesn't make me buy in itself - but my confidence meter does go up.

          It''s when they don't mention or have a guarantee is when I check deeper, have a let-me-think about it reaction .. or walk away. The only exception is if the price is so low the gamble of buying it doesn't matter.
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      • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
        Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post


        Frankly,I haven't bought anything because of a guarantee in years.
        At first read that statement was surprising to me. But after I think about it I haven't bought anything lately just because of a guarantee either.

        But I have had pause if I found out they didn't have one.

        For example, the cars I've bought, the homes, the appliances, the computers or iphones, etc.

        I didn't need an elaborate guarantee. Sometimes over-guaranteeing gives me doubts. I just need the confidence, whether written or implied, that if it doesn't work if I bring it back they'll give me my money back or another _______.
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        • Profile picture of the author Chriswrighto
          Has anyone ever tested with an up-front no-guarantee offer?

          *****

          Are you looking for a guarantee?

          We don't offer one.

          Why?

          Because we're so confident that NicheManliness will turn you into the alpha male of your tribe that you won't need one.

          In fact...

          If we did offer you a guarantee you would have forgotten about it within an hour of running through our system.

          Because it straight-up works.

          But...

          Here's what I will do...

          I'll spend 30 minutes on the phone helping you to get this set up... I'll even be there as you go through the system for your first time.

          I want to make sure that you know exactly how to use this product....

          blah...

          ********

          That type'a thing?

          Disclaimer... just woke up
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          Wealthcopywriter.com :)

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          • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
            Originally Posted by Chriswrighto View Post

            Has anyone ever tested with an up-front no-guarantee offer?
            Seems like that would take a lot of b*lls to do, especially if you're in a competitive market and everyone else has one.
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          • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
            Originally Posted by Chriswrighto View Post

            Has anyone ever tested with an up-front no-guarantee offer?

            *****

            Are you looking for a guarantee?

            We don't offer one.

            Why?

            Because we're so confident that NicheManliness will turn you into the alpha male of your tribe that you won't need one.

            In fact...

            If we did offer you a guarantee you would have forgotten about it within an hour of running through our system.

            Because it straight-up works.

            But...

            Here's what I will do...

            I'll spend 30 minutes on the phone helping you to get this set up... I'll even be there as you go through the system for your first time.

            I want to make sure that you know exactly how to use this product....

            blah...

            ********

            That type'a thing?

            Disclaimer... just woke up
            Been done.

            Dave Ramsey did it with his financial peace infoproduct. Made a killing.

            Only his wording was something like: "It works. If you use it, you won't WANT a refund. If you don't use it, it won't work and you can't HAVE a refund."

            Practically flatlined his refunds and sent consumption through the roof cause people who bought it were more apt to take personal responsibility.
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            • Profile picture of the author Chriswrighto
              Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

              Been done.

              Dave Ramsey did it with his financial peace infoproduct. Made a killing.

              Only his wording was something like: "It works. If you use it, you won't WANT a refund. If you don't use it, it won't work and you can't HAVE a refund."

              Practically flatlined his refunds and sent consumption through the roof cause people who bought it were more apt to take personal responsibility.
              Awesome, thanks Seth.
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Personally, I consider the word "guarantee" one of those buzz-click-whirrrr words. Like the word "bonus".

    I pepper the word throughout the beginning of the copy.

    "I guarantee, this is gonna shock you." "I guarantee, what you're about to hear will make your day, especially if..." "Guaranteed, this is gonna rock your world."

    I guarantee all sorts of non-relevant to the sale things. It creates a sense of comfort that I follow through on my promises. It shows I'm confident in what I'm saying.

    Just a little tip.

    - Rick Duris
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    • Profile picture of the author clever7
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      Personally, I consider the word "guarantee" one of those buzz-click-whirrrr words. Like the word "bonus".

      I pepper the word throughout the beginning of the copy.

      "I guarantee, this is gonna shock you." "I guarantee, what you're about to hear will make your day, especially if..." "Guaranteed, this is gonna rock your world."

      I guarantee all sorts of non-relevant to the sale things. It creates a sense of comfort that I follow through on my promises. It shows I'm confident in what I'm saying.

      Just a little tip.

      - Rick Duris
      This is a good tip. I saw (by chance) that the word 'guarantee' is effective when you can guarantee something related to your product because of 'this' and 'that' reason.

      The word 'guarantee' works when it is not merely a money-back guarantee.

      Nobody wants to waste their time trying a new solution to verify that it doesn't work in fact, even when they are sure that they will have their money back if they will cancel the transaction.

      They are not paid for their frustration, for the time they spent reading you offer and then, for the time they spent trying to understand your method.

      If you can guarantee that they won't be disappointed (with valid criteria) they will trust you.






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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by clever7 View Post

        If you can guarantee that they won't be disappointed (with valid criteria) they will trust you.
        Here's another little tip.

        You don't really want to guarantee they won't be disappointed.

        In order for a person to process that statement, neurologically speaking, they actually have to feel what it's like to be disappointed first.

        It's not exactly something you want people to experience in a sales letter. :\

        Rather, guarantee they'll feel good about something.

        - Rick Duris

        PS: As all the self help books say, focus on what you want. Not what you don't want.
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

          Rather, guarantee they'll feel good about something.

          PS: As all the self help books say, focus on what you want. Not what you don't want.
          This.

          The guarantee is an opportunity to reitterate a huge benefit, "If the SoulMate Attractor hasn't magnetized your one and only true love into your life 60 days from RIGHT NOW, I'm not interested in keeping a penny of your money."

          Be blantant in directing the attention of your prospects where YOU want it. The guarantee gives you that chance.

          Mark

          P.S. If prospects glance over the guarantee, like Rick said, your copy is working (assuming they buy.)
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          • Profile picture of the author multipliedmike
            I personally have a lot of fun with guarantees. Since everyone includes a guarantee & they all sound the same, I find it as an opportunity to show some personality & make it light.

            For instance, when I pitch my website reviews/critiques, I have a "Roast My Review Guarantee" which states that not only can you get your money back at the click of a button with no hard feelings - you also have the right to comedically roast my review & potentially win a cool prize if you make me laugh out loud (I'm a pretty easy laugh). Example format: "your review was so bad...punchline here."

            Now, that approach definitely won't work for everybody & I wouldn't suggest it, but for me, I can't tell you how many customers have told me how much they loved it & felt more comfortable about purchasing because I was so playful about it. Not to mention, it attracts the type of people I want - people that are fun to work with!

            Anyway, there's an example of something different in the very boring world of guarantees.
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  • One reason why we normally have to give a great guarantee is - there is so much junk out there.

    The good people have been burned many times - they need reassurances that it won't happen when they buy our stuff.

    And like it or not we are in the "guarantee" business - even if we don't give a guarantee anyone who is unhappy will demand one anyway.

    I always say to clients - no matter how poor the excuse is, or if they send the "product" back smashed to smithereens just give them an immediate refund.

    Because it actually saves endless hassle, time and money.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author DanteRomero
    A 30-Day money back guarantee has been a requirement for entry for years now. Simply make them a better offer. Go another mile... and perhaps 3.
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  • Most guarantees are bland and boring and as with anything in advertising that becomes "same old" it will get overlooked and discounted,

    Many product owners feel their customers will fleece them if they go with a "balls to the wall" guarantee like double your money back. Which is not true

    Sometimes offering no guarantee and stating that fact can help boost conversions as it adds to that take away factor.
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Check out Bill Glazer's approach...he calls it "Reason Why" copy. The copy is based on a story which tells the reader why the're making the guarantee. Guarantees which are backed by reasons are more personal and credible.
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