Examples of good training copy?

10 replies
My main reason at this point for learning copywriting is to create and sell a training product for the field I am in.

I'd like to take what I am learning and not only sell the product, but use the art of copywriting to make the training itself more readable and interesting to the consumer.

That, and create the copy to sell the product of course.

Have any of you run across, or created yourself, any training that used your copywriting skills to keep it interesting?

The field is completely hands on/mechanical and non internet related. The training would be sold to companies that have limited time to hold hands on training and would be an important supplement allowing their new staff to have something in writing they can learn the basics from and go back to when they have questions in the field.

It would also provide the company with something to hold their staff accountable with as far as the basics of the how to...

So, has anyone run across any good training that may fit this sort of criteria?

Thanks in advance for any ideas
#copy #examples #good #training
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by TracyBelshee View Post

    My main reason at this point for learning copywriting is to create and sell a training product for the field I am in.

    I'd like to take what I am learning and not only sell the product, but use the art of copywriting to make the training itself more readable and interesting to the consumer.

    That, and create the copy to sell the product of course.

    Have any of you run across, or created yourself, any training that used your copywriting skills to keep it interesting?

    The field is completely hands on/mechanical and non internet related. The training would be sold to companies that have limited time to hold hands on training and would be an important supplement allowing their new staff to have something in writing they can learn the basics from and go back to when they have questions in the field.

    It would also provide the company with something to hold their staff accountable with as far as the basics of the how to...

    So, has anyone run across any good training that may fit this sort of criteria?

    Thanks in advance for any ideas
    Why so cryptic?

    If you want good examples, you'll need to be more specific about what kind of training you're talking about.
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    • Profile picture of the author TracyBelshee
      Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

      Why so cryptic?

      If you want good examples, you'll need to be more specific about what kind of training you're talking about.
      Sorry about that. I'm in the towing industry and am planning written training showing the basic steps for using a variety of trucks commonly used. We currently have some that were created before I began working where I am and my goal is to redo them.

      The manuals would show the how to as well as the why for. In my experience dealing with drivers from other companies that come to our location, many are simply given a truck and told "good luck". Other companies only hire drivers that have previous experience.

      I find that a bit scary personally and hope to put together a product that will help these companies get their drivers on the road with as much knowledge up front as they can, given the short amount of time and resources so many places seem to have.

      But, I want to do it in a way that is interesting enough to keep their attention while informative enough to keep them safe.
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  • Profile picture of the author jrigdon73
    If you're writing a technical manual, its best to keep it simple. Have an editor you trust look over your drafts for readability and ease of comprehension.
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    • Profile picture of the author TracyBelshee
      Originally Posted by jrigdon73 View Post

      If you're writing a technical manual, its best to keep it simple. Have an editor you trust look over your drafts for readability and ease of comprehension.
      I don't believe it will be too technical. It isn't difficult stuff, but many are barely given the basics and when they are, they often are not told why they should do a thing a certain way.

      It's my belief that if they are given an option that tells them both how and why, in an interesting enough way, they will retain that knowledge and be safer and more professional on the road. Safer for themselves, and safer for the general public.
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      • Profile picture of the author jrigdon73
        Originally Posted by TracyBelshee View Post

        I don't believe it will be too technical. It isn't difficult stuff, but many are barely given the basics and when they are, they often are not told why they should do a thing a certain way.
        I meant 'technical' in the sense that its dry subject matter, not that its complex. There's no getting around the notion that this stuff will be pretty boring to read - no matter how well its written. Just make is short, sweet and to the point -- have a few people with different levels or relevant expertise look over your writing to see if it makes sense.
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        • Profile picture of the author TracyBelshee
          Originally Posted by jrigdon73 View Post

          I meant 'technical' in the sense that its dry subject matter, not that its complex. There's no getting around the notion that this stuff will be pretty boring to read - no matter how well its written. Just make is short, sweet and to the point -- have a few people with different levels or relevant expertise look over your writing to see if it makes sense.
          Good point, I appreciate that. I'll definitely have it looked over by several people with relevant experience. In fact, that's how I'll get "expert reviews", etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Consider a video series in addition, or in place of a written document.
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    • Profile picture of the author TracyBelshee
      Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

      Consider a video series in addition, or in place of a written document.
      Thanks, this is something I have been considering as well. I'll need my companies approval for this sort of thing which may or may not be a problem, but it's something I will be looking into.

      One of the reasons for wanting it written is that OSHA is beginning to require some specific written policies and procedures in our auto shop. The requirements began around 2008, but are only now just beginning to be enforced. This means pretty much no one has anything available.

      We just finished getting this done for the shop to become compliant so I thought this may be a great way to head them off at the pass so to speak on the tow side as well.

      Plus, the written stuff is something I can do without their approval, since it will not require their equipment and reputation

      Both products are something I'm considering creating. The tow training as well as the policies and procedures that are required for the auto shop.
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  • Profile picture of the author jrigdon73
    Sorry for any confusion.
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    • Profile picture of the author TracyBelshee
      Originally Posted by jrigdon73 View Post

      Sorry for any confusion.
      No worries, the confusion is usually on my side
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