This is a great marketing seeding tool that I really want to know.

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Hi there,
I've just had a look at a bracelet site. and see a note that showed on the bottom left of the screen. It said " Someone just buys a bracelet. I know for sure it was fake information but it could help us raise the conversion rate. Does anyone know about it? how does it call? Let's see this picture.
#great #marketing #seeding #tool
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  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    Yes, it is an app available on many shopping cart platforms and several companies make similar apps. If you're using Shopify, just do a Google search for "shopify app someone just purchased" and you'll find a number to choose from. If you are using WooCommerce, search for "woocommerce app someone just purchased". Etc ....

    Like all such gimmicks, it will soon be on so many sites, consumers won't believe it anymore. Spin the Wheel for a Discount will see the end of its time soon, too.
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  • Profile picture of the author dburk
    Hi Smith Jack,

    The two most popular services for those social proof widgets are Provely.io and Useproof.com.

    I do have data that shows the use of those widgets tends to boost conversions.

    While it is possible to use fake information with one of those apps, both do offer genuine user behavior as part of the service. The way it works is that it captures data from order forms, or lead forms, and then displays data about recent conversions.

    Is it a gimmick?

    Yes, I believe it is a gimmick. It is just as effective as using reviews and testimonials, it has a measurable impact on a significant percentage of users, and less of an impact on others.

    HTH,

    Don Burk
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    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by dburk View Post

      Hi Smith Jack,

      The two most popular services for those social proof widgets are Provely.io and Useproof.com.

      I do have data that shows the use of those widgets tends to boost conversions.

      While it is possible to use fake information with one of those apps, both do offer genuine user behavior as part of the service. The way it works is that it captures data from order forms, or lead forms, and then displays data about recent conversions.

      Is it a gimmick?

      Yes, I believe it is a gimmick. It is just as effective as using reviews and testimonials, it has a measurable impact on a significant percentage of users, and less of an impact on others.

      HTH,

      Don Burk
      Of course it works ... until it becomes so prevalent on websites, it doesn't.

      I'd also argue that it is not even close to the same thing as a testimonial or review. One says "somebody just bought something" (and we have no clue if they are going to happy with it). The other is a mini-review from a customer who bought and was happy they did or an actual assessment of a product (or company), whether they are happy or not.
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      StoreCoach.com- Learn How to Dropship the Right Way - Buy & Sell Websites - Partner with Coach
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox News, the NY Times & Flippa
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      • Profile picture of the author dburk
        Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

        Of course it works ... until it becomes so prevalent on websites, it doesn't.

        I'd also argue that it is not even close to the same thing as a testimonial or review. One says "somebody just bought something" (and we have no clue if they are going to happy with it). The other is a mini-review from a customer who bought and was happy they did or an actual assessment of a product (or company), whether they are happy or not.
        Hi Dave,

        Are you arguing that if reviews and testimonial becomes so prevalent they will no longer work?

        I'm not sure I buy that theory in principle. I have found about 25% of you visitors will rely almost solely on reviews, ratings and testimonials, while another 25% will not trust them at all.

        Sorry, I don't mean to use this line of questioning as a strawman argument. My intent is to use it as an analogy. That is why I phrased it as a question rather than inferring that you said something you didn't. My point is to say these widgets are in the exact same category as other social proof widgets and web content.

        Reviews, ratings, testimonials, and social proof widgets are all various forms of social proof, as are certain quantifiable metrics used in sales copy.

        Will some become overused, abused, and therefore become less trusted? Yes, probably. However, conversion data is measurable proof that certain things work, regardless of how much we like them, or not.

        Again, I will say that these widgets are definitely a gimmicky way of presenting social proof, but you cannot deny the data that show they work well at boosting conversions. And that includes boosting conversions on website that already contain reviews, ratings and testimonials. They are just another platform for providing social proof.

        What if, instead of social widgets becoming less effective, people become accustomed to seeing these widgets on trustworthy websites and begin to trust websites without them less?

        I'm not saying that will definitely happen, but we haven't seen them around long enough to say for certain whether they will become accepted and trusted, and perhaps even expected. Or, as you say, become less effective. Either outcome is possible and we can only speculate as to what the future will hold.

        Personally, I find them slightly annoying, because they can be somewhat intrusive. Who knows how I will feel about them in 3 years? And who knows how many people will come to trust and respond to them even more than I ever will?

        Just saying don't knock it you haven't tried it.

        Don Burk
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        • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
          Originally Posted by dburk View Post

          Hi Dave,

          Are you arguing that if reviews and testimonial becomes so prevalent they will no longer work?

          I'm not sure I buy that theory in principle. I have found about 25% of you visitors will rely almost solely on reviews, ratings and testimonials, while another 25% will not trust them at all.

          Sorry, I don't mean to use this line of questioning as a strawman argument. My intent is to use it as an analogy. That is why I phrased it as a question rather than inferring that you said something you didn't. My point is to say these widgets are in the exact same category as other social proof widgets and web content.

          Reviews, ratings, testimonials, and social proof widgets are all various forms of social proof, as are certain quantifiable metrics used in sales copy.

          Will some become overused, abused, and therefore become less trusted? Yes, probably. However, conversion data is measurable proof that certain things work, regardless of how much we like them, or not.

          Again, I will say that these widgets are definitely a gimmicky way of presenting social proof, but you cannot deny the data that show they work well at boosting conversions. And that includes boosting conversions on website that already contain reviews, ratings and testimonials. They are just another platform for providing social proof.

          What if, instead of social widgets becoming less effective, people become accustomed to seeing these widgets on trustworthy websites and begin to trust websites without them less?

          I'm not saying that will definitely happen, but we haven't seen them around long enough to say for certain whether they will become accepted and trusted, and perhaps even expected. Or, as you say, become less effective. Either outcome is possible and we can only speculate as to what the future will hold.

          Personally, I find them slightly annoying, because they can be somewhat intrusive. Who knows how I will feel about them in 3 years? And who knows how many people will come to trust and respond to them even more than I ever will?

          Just saying don't knock it you haven't tried it.

          Don Burk
          Nope, quite the opposite. It was suggested that the "somebody just bought" widget was the same thing as testimonials and reviews. I was stating that they are not at all the same. Testimonials and reviews are much more powerful. The "somebody just bought" widget is something that tells you nothing about a customer's satisfaction or dissatisfaction with your company or products.
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          StoreCoach.com- Learn How to Dropship the Right Way - Buy & Sell Websites - Partner with Coach
          My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox News, the NY Times & Flippa
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  • Profile picture of the author shoptechmedia
    I think it is a great idea to have.. and I agree though that it should present correct information.. however that data is retrieved and presented we will never know, unless you are the developer or the owner of the site.. but yes, it does help sales..
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  • Profile picture of the author Medon
    It is a good invention though. I know that in some cases, it just pops up to help the buyer make up their mind. If somebody else has bought this item, then it must be good. The effect is to increase sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Huenelde
    This is a great idea. It will help raise your ratings and sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author sgalla414
    I think this is a good tool to showcase other products that people are buying. E.g. "someone just bought shirt xyz" and your current prospective customer is looking at shirt abc, they might go checkout what is so great about shirt xyz. I think it is a bit gimmicky if you are using it to try and increase conversions. One time I visited a site a few times in a row and the "someone just bought" was almost literally just on a loop. Each time I went to that site it was the same people buying the same things over and over again.
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  • Profile picture of the author Muhammad Hasan
    i suggest you to take any think from those sellers whom are selling there goods , after checking pay to them .
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