How many more years can ecommerce businesses remain......

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operating before some big change comes along and completely turns on its head the way business is done?

I know its all speculation but how might the landscape change in the future?

I ask because I want to create a long term business and I see myself more and more getting into ecommerce, a shift away from content heavy sites.
#businesses #ecommerce #remain #years
  • Profile picture of the author Shaolinsteve
    I have been working with a business that was evolved around an eCommerce setting since 2008. They pulled in over 20,000 customers at that time and mostly focusing on one niche. You can take many different routes on this but as a Long Term business plan you need to be in the right environment and know exactly what's involved.

    Check out: http://storecoach.com

    They have an entire course for free that should hopefully give you a much better insight for using eCommerce for Long Term business.
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  • Really, this is with ANY business - ecommerce or not.

    Times change, and businesses HAVE to evolve.

    When computers came out - ALL businesses had to start filing with computers in order to compete and keep their customers happy with the speed and efficiency it brought.

    The ones that were 'stuck in their ways' because 'what wasn't broke didn't wanna fix' were left in the dust and wen't the way of the blacksmith.

    All business has to evolve and adapt to the times because change always comes.
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  • Profile picture of the author PBScott
    I had a friend of mine say when I started my international e-commerce business that I would not be able to do this forever because the net and the world would change. With the possibilities of wars and other such things always a possibility, he is correct. Recently big business has been making things very hard for the little guy on the net, and this might continue to be the trend.

    I told him I didn't care so long as I had enough money to go on towards the next thing.

    I live off of e-commerce currently but I am trying to leverage some of my earnings into brick and mortar.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sylwia
    E-commerce industry will expand in UK by 11% (USA 5.4%) for next four years.
    Check this article, very interesting: eCommerce - New Media Trend Watch UK
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  • Profile picture of the author Anton543
    I know you need to adapt. And as long as you are making money in the meantime you can incur the costs to adapt. However, I am talking about the overall ecommerce environment and how it is done today. Are we going to see a major change in the way business is carried out in 5/6 years time compared to now? Traffic is one thing, what I want to know is the actual process and whether that will change in a significant way.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnirwin
    E-commerce has flourished during the recent years.Almost all the countries have online stores for providing the best features to the people.
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    Please stop promoting your website in your posts.
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  • Profile picture of the author PBScott
    I really feel the big guys are crushing the little guys off the internet these days and the trend will continue, but maybe I am wrong.
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  • It only feels that way because Google's Panda and Penguin updates are making sure quality dominates low-quality cheaters.

    Many start-ups that haven't established their quality yet have to migrate to PPC in order to establish their brand in the beginnings to compete with the 'big guys'.

    It's exactly what Google wants as well.

    'Only rank the big guys so that all start ups have to flock to PPC' That's where the $$$ is.
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  • Profile picture of the author anandshaw
    Google ranking & success in e-commerce is only one part of the game. Having more than 8 yrs of experience with retail consulting (mostly offline) I see more focus on customer service & branding. With global adoption rate for e-commerce increasing I see small e-tailers focused on local market with greater focus on customer service gaining immensely.
    I also believe that such e-tailers will attract a lot of local backlinks & Google may not be able to downgrade their SERP
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    • Profile picture of the author PBScott
      Originally Posted by anandshaw View Post

      With global adoption rate for e-commerce increasing I see small e-tailers focused on local market with greater focus on customer service gaining immensely.
      I also believe that such e-tailers will attract a lot of local backlinks & Google may not be able to downgrade their SERP
      You can't get customers to take care of or backlinks or anything else until you are sent visitors. The only option these days seems to buy your way onto the internet with marketing, but you compete against all the billion dollar companies for this ad space as well.

      There is no place for the very little guy on the internet anymore, though this website has not banished signature links yet, many have, as well as having robots.txt block profile pages, and obfuscating links. This was probably an unexpected result of the recent Google updates, but it sure upset the traffic to a lot of small business.Not to mention things like Facebook cutting back customer contact on your fan pages to approximately 15%.

      I am not saying it is time to give up all hope, but you better have your game together and some money behind you to get started now, or gamble on blackhat games.

      I have been running a legitimate website with a small network for four years now, and even though the website has gone from about 300 original content pages to 1200 original content pages, I get less visitors than I did two years ago, and have increased my advertising by more than double. Thank goodness for our repeat customers, and referrals, they have been keeping us afloat since the spring, and bought enough for Christmas to put us back in the black for the year.

      I know there is a point you can reach where suddenly Google starts pushing you forward and it is less of a fight, but it is becoming a place that is increasingly difficult to reach. The moving finish line is too fast for many people to keep up with. My website are currently rising but I spent $3000 in December on advertising to do so, and I have no idea if I will ever get that back. I will be doubling my staff in spring to see if we can catch up with where we need to be.

      Good luck to anyone starting up these days. I hope things change but this is my take on today's market.

      I wrote a post a while back with some stats in an info-graphic on the right, have a look if you like.

      http://planetarybargains.com/Blog/my...-internet/work
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      • Profile picture of the author NeillMac
        I started my first online business in 1999 (a single product website in a seasonal market) and although I obviously have more sites now, that small first site still brings in hundreds every Christmas.

        1999 was an era before Google (Yahoo was the big search engine then). Site construction with MS FrontPage was easy and when PPC evolved with Overture it was simply a bidding war against what little competition existed. Competition is now immense in popular niches, PPC can be a nightmare and launching an authority site requires a tremendous amount of real work - although thank goodness for WordPress. We are still working out the implications of the Pandas and Penguins and by all accounts another Google creature will be upon us very shortly.

        The one thing I have discovered over the years is that we cannot see the future with any certainty. I strongly agree with the comments above that it is now harder for the little guy to compete with the big boys online (and it is getting harder). My concern is that this difficulty makes it easier for those pushing the "$1 Million Button" to the little guys who have tried and failed so many times.

        I still believe that if you have a product that is wanted by people (as opposed to being needed!), and if you have excellent customer service then you have the basis for a good business. It might just take a little longer to get there online than it did previously.

        I wish you every success in your venture.


        Neill
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  • Profile picture of the author lastreporter
    Originally Posted by Anton543 View Post

    operating before some big change comes along and completely turns on its head the way business is done?

    I know its all speculation but how might the landscape change in the future?

    I ask because I want to create a long term business and I see myself more and more getting into ecommerce, a shift away from content heavy sites.
    As someone who makes a living through ecommerce, I believe 2013 will be the year that the US and other countries start taxing products sold on the Internet uniformly. This means states and countries where you don't collect sales taxes now, will be doing it for you upfront!

    Retail associations worldwide have been pushing for this with millions in political contributions and the bankrupt governments need another pocket to pick .

    It will be the us they choose.

    This could have a very adverse effect on ecommerce, especially, mom and pop or solo operators. It will make your price less competitive and your margins even smaller than they already are.

    That's the biggest threat I see coming our way big time.

    By the way, the reason I got away from content sites, I am a former news reporter, is I found that Google has basically made it impossible to get enough organic visitors to sustain such endeavors. Content sites worldwide are dying a slow death . Soon, you will only get visitors if you pay the big G.

    You won't find this assessment on this forum, but believe me it's a fact -- and I can back it up.
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    • Profile picture of the author PBScott
      Originally Posted by lastreporter View Post

      By the way, the reason I got away from content sites, I am a former news reporter, is I found that Google has basically made it impossible to get enough organic visitors to sustain such endeavors. Content sites worldwide are dying a slow death . Soon, you will only get visitors if you pay the big G.
      At that point the internet would look just like every other shopping mall in the world. All big brands and no mom and pop stores.

      I hope this isn't the future.

      Everything is becoming so generic, I already miss some of the good blogs that used to come up in search results.
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      • Profile picture of the author lastreporter
        One way I have survived is by changing products and niches. One product or niche becomes saturated or dies, I try and anticipate it -- then move to another newer and less populated niche. It works.
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  • Profile picture of the author Danceparty
    if someone says "ecommerce can not remain", they must be in their 50s...
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    • Profile picture of the author PBScott
      Originally Posted by Danceparty View Post

      if someone says "ecommerce can not remain", they must be in their 50s...
      Nobody said that, I think you misread the OP, the way it was formatted is difficult.
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