Magento, Shopify, Wordpress... what is REALLY the best choice?

by zannix
194 replies
  • ECOMMERCE
  • |
Hey guys,

If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

Thanks a lot!
Zannix
#choice #magento #shopify #wordpress
  • Profile picture of the author Tonyk518
    I've heard that about Magento too, have you looked at Opencart?

    Themeforest has a bunch of Opencart themes but I also like the idea of Woocommerce, since 2.0. looks good too.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7879718].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
    opencart is amazing! Dont knock it because its opensource. We've built 2 sites on opencart and have not run into any problems we cant fix. Not has heavy as magento but at the fraction of the cost.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7880032].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Dante Galahad
      Originally Posted by Michael Nguyen View Post

      opencart is amazing! Dont knock it because its opensource. We've built 2 sites on opencart and have not run into any problems we cant fix. Not has heavy as magento but at the fraction of the cost.
      if i want to customize it how deep i need to know or understand when it come to coding from html, css, java script, j query and depressing php?.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10047165].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Endy Godwin
      Originally Posted by Michael Nguyen View Post

      opencart is amazing! Dont knock it because its opensource. We've built 2 sites on opencart and have not run into any problems we cant fix. Not has heavy as magento but at the fraction of the cost.
      Hello Michael, could you please share the sites to have a feel of the layout at least. Thanks.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10086140].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author osiedle
    Opencart is a decent open source solution. The platform is free and the plugin extensions are less expensive (30-50% cheaper) than official Woocommerce plugins for example. BUT, after about 2 years of working with Opencart I can testify that they suck, especially the support -- even for developers. They release updates very rarely and when they do they don't really give developers a chance to participate or get early access. That means that if you upgrade your version and you're using several 3rd party plugins -- which you likely will to have a kickass site -- there's a good chance you'll lose a whole lot of customization work. The Opencart team could care less, so I'd say beware. It's not for everyone -- especially not newbies. Just my opinion.
    Signature
    Website for Sale! --> $3,246/mo 1K unq #1 Google - 100% OUTSOURCED 2-Yr Old Drop ship Site
    CLICK HERE TO BID ON THIS FLIPPA AUCTION
    HURRY -- Auction ends soon!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7882317].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Aussie_Al
      I like Big Commerce - look into them too

      From what i was told about Shopify they take a % of each sale you make
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7882594].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author ColeWriting
        I used Shopify recently for my very first drop-shipping store. I had never used either and had a WSO from WF about setting up a drop-shipping store. Both Magento and Shopify were recommended.

        I checked both out and decided that for me (new to dropshipping) Shopify was easier to use and set up.

        What I have been told is that if you have a larger store and lots of products Magento is great.

        But for ease of setup...Shopify.

        Rocky
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883137].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Danceparty
    Shopify for you.

    When you're ready for 10k products, switch to Magento
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883050].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rlcf
    Shopify for sure. Extremely easy to use and it makes attractive websites.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883132].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Aussie_Al
    Rocky is it true Shopify takes a % commission per sale?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883372].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Frankie B Frank
    Shopify is slick, easy to use (for you & customers) & just feels good. The transaction fee is worth it IMO (read more here: About Shopify's Transaction Fees)
    Signature
    Amazon Kindle (romance/fiction)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883460].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tonyk518
    There is also Ecwid: E-Commerce Widgets
    and next.x-cart.com (hosted x-cart)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7883975].message }}
  • Personally, I think it's going to be the one you try first.

    I like Wordpress. A lot. Why? Because it's the one I tried first, liked first, and because I've learned it quite well, and had a lot of success with it, I didn't see the NEED to move onto another platform.

    I'm unsure that a lot of people that give their recommendations have even TRIED the other platforms. I could be wrong, but I'm not ashamed to say that I haven't tried them - haven't seen the need.

    But I will give my testimonial of Wordpress. I know it works well, has a lot of great capabilities, and has a lot of features that I need. I've never come across a 'need' that wasn't met by a plugin.
    Signature
    Famous for my '$1000 dollar challenge,' I've been teaching people how to DOMINATE on eBay for YEARS. Sell 100% of your items FOR A PROFIT. Rank higher, sell faster, sell more, and DESTROY your competition with a data-based approach. Quit listening to Guru's-in-training! Click now below!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7884158].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author OnlineStoreHelp
      Originally Posted by Auctiondebteliminator View Post

      Personally, I think it's going to be the one you try first.

      I like Wordpress. A lot. Why? Because it's the one I tried first, liked first, and because I've learned it quite well, and had a lot of success with it, I didn't see the NEED to move onto another platform.

      I'm unsure that a lot of people that give their recommendations have even TRIED the other platforms. I could be wrong, but I'm not ashamed to say that I haven't tried them - haven't seen the need.

      But I will give my testimonial of Wordpress. I know it works well, has a lot of great capabilities, and has a lot of features that I need. I've never come across a 'need' that wasn't met by a plugin.
      I have tried and used BigCommerce, Shopify, 3dCart, Americommerce, Wordpress, Opencart, PrestaShop and Zen Cart (as well as evaluating others as time permits). I actually have recorded reviews of three of them at this time, which is why you will see every recommendation I give on cart depends exactly what you are using it for. I tell you where each one excels and where it falls short.

      Wordpress has its place (I use it quite extensively) but if you want an online store, you really need to use a cart, that's what they are designed for. While Woocommerce and other plugins give you functionality it will always fall short what the carts provide in out of the box functionality.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7885461].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author fastservicespk
        Originally Posted by OnlineStoreHelp View Post

        I have tried and used BigCommerce, Shopify, 3dCart, Americommerce, Wordpress, Opencart, PrestaShop and Zen Cart (as well as evaluating others as time permits). I actually have recorded reviews of three of them at this time, which is why you will see every recommendation I give on cart depends exactly what you are using it for. I tell you where each one excels and where it falls short.

        Wordpress has its place (I use it quite extensively) but if you want an online store, you really need to use a cart, that's what they are designed for. While Woocommerce and other plugins give you functionality it will always fall short what the carts provide in out of the box functionality.
        can u tell open cart is best or woocommerce
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8274700].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author OnlineStoreHelp
          Originally Posted by fastservicespk View Post

          can u tell open cart is best or woocommerce
          Between those two, if it is a true ecommerce website, I would use OpenCart. I would say they both have about the same learning curve but you get the benefit of everything being designed around commerce in OpenCart. I have to give kudos to woocommerce and what they have done but the security issues in Wordpress will preclude me from using them for anything except PayPal WebStandard checkout.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8287299].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
            Originally Posted by OnlineStoreHelp View Post

            Between those two, if it is a true ecommerce website, I would use OpenCart. I would say they both have about the same learning curve but you get the benefit of everything being designed around commerce in OpenCart. I have to give kudos to woocommerce and what they have done but the security issues in Wordpress will preclude me from using them for anything except PayPal WebStandard checkout.
            Well OnlineStoreHelp, this may be the first time I remember not seeing eye-to-eye with you on a topic here at WF!

            I felt the same way up until recently, but the efforts Woo has put into security improvements this past year has made them pretty rock solid for using iframed and off-site payment processing solutions. I still wouldn't use them (or ANY self-hosted solution) for traditional on-site payment processing though!

            IMO, the WP+Woo interface is easier for someone to get used to if they've ever used blogging software in the past but haven't ever used a store platform software (which is quite common I have found). Also, the amount of up-to-date & support plugins is better and the stores being built on Woo look more modern to me!

            All-in-all they are pretty close though, so either solution would work for an experienced person that is capable of handling the configuration involved in setting up a store on a self-hosted solution!
            Signature
            StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
            My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8288691].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Reinhart Osmond
    Hi,zannix
    I still recommend WordPress to build websites E-Commerce because wordpress has a lot of Theme or Plugin that can support e-commerce website you become better and interesting.
    Thanks
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7885269].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author albertsmith31
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7885811].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    Do any of these interact well w/ quickbooks? for item info, accounting, billing, inventory etc....Thinkin that would be pretty slick to avoid multiple data entry of various information.
    Signature

    In a moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing. ~ Theodore Roosevelt

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7886399].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author suavocado
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7887043].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author FelixFuturi
      Originally Posted by suavocado View Post

      I use prestashop. Seo is easy for it, I only paid for a theme (about $70) then edited it to look the part I needed. I only have around 300 products or so on the site, if I had 1000 or more I'd go with magento. I personally don't like wordpress as ecommerce unless you have very few products you want to blog about (handmade bags etc.). The only thing I didn't like about prestashop is importing through .csv (all are welcome to pm me about it.)

      Have a look at my site here if you like.
      You took the words right out of my mouth. When I saw the thread I had to hop in here and mention PrestaShop.

      About a year or maybe two ago (time flies these days) I was looking to start a drop shipping e commerce site, and ebay was being a pain with their limits to 3 auctions so I looked at magento shopify and then found prestashop.

      Magento was too "heavy" as you say. Too complicated. Shopify would have been fine but was on a tight budget, and what money I had I wanted to spend on marketing. At the time, not sure if it is now, it was a monthly charge with a commission on top of it. The margins weren't that great on the drop ship products anyway so that excluded shopify.

      On my web hosting I noticed prestashop. I installed it to a test directory and played with it a bit. Within about four hours I was ready to sell..it was that easy. Didn't take any coding or special technology or plugins, and SEO was easy as well.

      Definitely should evaluate it, I'd say.
      Signature
      Business Coach, Life Coach, Developer, Marketer
      Felix Futuri - Professional Development Community
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8259065].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author goodmast3r
    Wordpress for less than 100 products , magento for thousands of products.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7888324].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kenetix
    Personally I like opencart for its simplicity and easy customizability
    Signature

    Free advertising for your services - beam.biz

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7892289].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ShaggyMax
      Used ZenCart for a number of years and more recently, Magento for 2 years. Magento has a ton of built-in functionality and even more available extensions. Have been very please with Magento, once the script was running properly. 1.7 has been very stable. It is heavy and requires a solid server environment.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7899161].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Felix Andrian
    I personally like Wordpress. Why? Because you can easily find plugins and themes to work with.
    I am now trying woocommerce, like the plugin a lot. Creating an online shop with wordpress and woocommerce plugin is really easy.

    Cheers
    Signature
    Success is a journey not a destination
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7899992].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I use Woocommerce. I have Woocommerce sites with thousands of products in them. I particularly like the no ecommerce platform fee with Woocommerce. With the csv import extension, if you have a wholesaler who offers a csv file, importing all the products is very easy. If not, putting them in manually is as easy as posting in Wordpress.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7912299].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tstrad07
    I had a great experience with CubeCart which is somewhat like opencart, but for me it was very user friendly and you can load hundreds of products and it installs right from your cpanel with fantastico.....check it out.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7914074].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dswconsulting
    I'm working on my first woocommerce ecomm site....its really easy, not sure about performance so far but easy to mange. I have an existing site with opencart and at no fault of theirs exactly - its not performing as expected. (partially due to my own fault for lack of research. It was my wifes - hobby turned ecomm) None the less it was a great learning experience that has opened other avenues for us...here is my open cart site: Unique Baby Gifts As you can see the visual appeal on the landing page is nice as it is home made. The problem is the inner category pages - pics are small and very boring as a whole. We also lack the flexibility with making necessary changes in terms of optimization and click through rates. Hope this helps.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7914423].message }}
  • I think you could use Wordpress for just about everything. It is more flexible in a clean e-commerce solution and almost all features in Magento etc can be achieved with Wordpress. The advantage with a clean magento solution is however that you dont have to deal with a ton of plugins and customizations.
    Signature

    Looking to connect with people

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7925934].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ZachRobinson
      I know same here, its down to Magento and Shopify. I just don't like to pay shopify transaction fees and monthly fees. Its another monthly fee on top of everything else, web programer, content builder etc. Maybe its just a price of doing business.
      Signature

      Zach Robinson

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7926490].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Money79
    Hi,

    Actually I use a prestashop site for less than 500 products, woocommerce for less than 100 products and Magento for more than 1000 products.

    For me prestashop site is the best solution also for SEO scope. Infact the prestashop site developed for my customer are all very well visibility.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7928687].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Money79 View Post

      Hi,

      Actually I use a prestashop site for less than 500 products, woocommerce for less than 100 products and Magento for more than 1000 products.

      For me prestashop site is the best solution also for SEO scope. Infact the prestashop site developed for my customer are all very well visibility.
      I've got Woocommerce stores with thousands of products. The CSV Import extension makes it a breeze to import products.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7928972].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author j40u
    I used to manage an online store with over a couple million in revenue, which used Magento. Although Magento used to be the "go-to" system to use back in the days, wordpress (with plugins and other open source carts can also be capable.
    However, I recommend Magento overall but if you're only starting out Wordpress would still work fine. Feel free to PM me if you need any more help
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7928922].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author belgianguy
    I highly recommend woocommerce as well. I use it in combination with the woothemes superstore theme and I absolutely love it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7928986].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Digibite
    I run a webdesign company.
    For small stores of up to 1000 products we use woocommerce or any other wordpress solution.
    If your planing on getting bigger, I used to use CREloaded, but now we use opencart, and I will warmly recommend it.

    For large site I hear Magento is the best, but really by the time you need to use magento, you will have a dedicated server, and so much traffic and sales, that it will be worth it.

    Anyway I hope this helps.
    Eco
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7929048].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Maui Joe
    magento


    but not if you're not technically inclined or afraid to dive into code. otherwise it's the most powerful and capable system out there imo
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7930222].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ZachRobinson
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    Based from everyones input which shopping cart are you leaning towards?
    Signature

    Zach Robinson

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7930972].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author wakeforce139
    I work with Magento daily. If you can't code at least at a proficient level or don't want to pay a developer for help here and there then expect to be paying for some extensions. Magento is very powerful as people have said but it's not plug and play. Woocommerce is more than capable for what you are requesting.

    I have worked with both (and others) and this is my honest opinion: Magento is great for people with resources. Woocommerce is more than sufficient for people without. As sbucciarel mentioned, you should spend the money on the Woocommerce CSV import extension if you plan to increase your product offering. That should be the only extension you will need to buy.
    Signature

    Need A Feed for ANY Price Comparison Site? Message me

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7931429].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author merezza
    If you're asking this question then you should use Shopify, it's the ecommerce solution that gets rid of all the extra crap and makes your life easy.

    Magento is good, but you need to be able to use it on a large scale and furthermore need to be knowledgeable on how exactly to set it up, otherwise it will crater your business.

    Wordpress shouldn't even be in this discussion. If you're focused on building a quality site, you need to use a quality solution. Wordpress, while useful for many things, is NOT an ecommerce solution.
    Signature

    Tired of recieiving copy from writers that sound like Engrish is their fifth language? Get serious about your content. Hire the best

    Simply Solid Writing

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7932146].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by merezza View Post

      Wordpress shouldn't even be in this discussion. If you're focused on building a quality site, you need to use a quality solution. Wordpress, while useful for many things, is NOT an ecommerce solution.
      That simply isn't true. Woocommerce, along with the extensions you can buy can do just about anything that any of the other solutions do without costing an arm and a leg in monthly fees.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7932154].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jking1
    I prefer Magento.

    Its easy to use even newbies can make Normal shopping cart sites.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7932148].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author squadron
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    Zannix
    I recommend you have a look at Cart66 for Wordpress. It will work with most themes and is pretty easy to set up.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7933227].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WeavingThoughts
    Wordpress would be the easiest and cheapest to setup and maintain. Not to advertise but to put in perspective, I charge $197 for a Wordpress store but over $1000 for a similar magento store. So magento is definitely costlier because web developers try to fleece you and not many know that cms.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7933272].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MKaren
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix

    xcart is good...I have no experience with others
    Signature
    "An Entrepreneur has a Curiosity of a Child,Fearless like a Warrior,Mindset of a Scientist,Endurance of an Athlete, Heart of a Saint and Attitude of a Winner"
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7934628].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WeavingThoughts
    Which one are you most comfortable with?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7934662].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ryan David
    Shopsite has my vote. I wouldn't tie myself into a solution that takes a % of sale. Fully customizable, you can buy or lease the software, and then hosting fees are like $30/month (with Lexiconn). Lexiconn's support is top-notch.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7935599].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ZachRobinson
      Originally Posted by Ryan David View Post

      Shopsite has my vote. I wouldn't tie myself into a solution that takes a % of sale. Fully customizable, you can buy or lease the software, and then hosting fees are like $30/month (with Lexiconn). Lexiconn's support is top-notch.
      I am leaning towards shopify too, so are you saying shopify is a good choice?
      Signature

      Zach Robinson

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7935653].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jcaviani
    The topic I see largely missing from this discussion is security. If you run sites with your own hosting, especially Wordpress, you had better know what you are doing with security or you are pretty vulnerable. The absence of the mention of the word is this thread tells me most people do not even consider it until it happens - HUGE mistake. For this reason alone, the small fees that Shopify charges are worth every cent.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7939545].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author marketm
      Originally Posted by jcaviani View Post

      The topic I see largely missing from this discussion is security. If you run sites with your own hosting, especially Wordpress, you had better know what you are doing with security or you are pretty vulnerable. The absence of the mention of the word is this thread tells me most people do not even consider it until it happens - HUGE mistake. For this reason alone, the small fees that Shopify charges are worth every cent.
      Well the things are not as simple as that. Shopify.com is not the only provider for such services, BigCommerce.com do provide that as well and few others.

      If we will take a look at the Shopify fees, for their most popular plan ($59), they apply 10% transaction fees, and this will affect the profit with 10%, which is not that great.

      Using open source scripts it will not cut the profit with 10%. If you do have a good hosting provider which take care of it's customers and security wholes you are on the safe hands

      Most of this hosting providers do provide auto-installers scripts. Installing a shopping cart it can be done on autopilot and in seconds.

      I do like of using servers from a reliables hosting providers, such as wiredtree.com

      It is recommended to install an SSL certificate to make your customers trust your shop (for instance the cheap one can be bought from NameCheap.com for only $8/yr). Installing it it is really easy and if your hosting account it is managed, all you need to do is to pass the key to them and they will do their job in minutes.

      I've used and tested most of the carts available. The best ones I've found so far (in terms of support, forums response - from users, updates, fixing bugs, etc) is: Prestashop.com (speed and seo are it's main benefits, lots of features, etc)

      Prestashop can be used for medium shops, I've had it running for more then 5,000+ products on a VPS hosting without any problems.

      The second one I do like is Magento. This is it really powerful, but to run it as it should be, on it's full power, it should be hosted on dedicated server with a good and optimized server configuration, otherwise it will eat your server resources really fast. I would recommend it for corporate shops (at least 10,000 products) otherwise it does not justify using it.

      Customizing the design of the shop is important also. For Prestashop, professional themes are starting at $20 on prestacoder.com and for Magento, themes can be found at hellothemes.com for $80.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7939927].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Digibite
        Thats good advice there marketm. its a shame you did not mention wordpress carts for small business.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7939957].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by jcaviani View Post

      The topic I see largely missing from this discussion is security. If you run sites with your own hosting, especially Wordpress, you had better know what you are doing with security or you are pretty vulnerable. The absence of the mention of the word is this thread tells me most people do not even consider it until it happens - HUGE mistake. For this reason alone, the small fees that Shopify charges are worth every cent.
      Security

      WooCommerce 2.0+ has been fully security audited by the leading WordPress security firm Sucuri to ensure it meets the highest WordPress security standards possible.

      http://www.woothemes.com/woocommerce/
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7940130].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author AffluentGifts
        As a Systems Administrator, I see hundreds of shopping carts a day. Most are resource intensive, misconfigured, and/or insecure. The ones that aren't are maintained by experienced developers and have attentive webmasters. Most of these run Magento on dedicated servers.

        I would recommend a hosted cart in your situation. Shopify may work, but I just found something awesome.

        Magento Go - Hosted Magento!


        I highly recommend getting that. You can easily transfer to your own Magento installation on one or more dedicated servers when that time comes, and it's pretty reasonably priced:

        Up to 100 SKUs $15/mo

        Up to 500 SKUs $25/mo <- you probably want this one

        Up to 1000 SKUs $65/mo

        Up to 10000 SKUs $125/mo

        If you have a budget, want full control (so not a hosted solution), are very committed to growing your business, and intend to add a fair number of products over the first year or two - get a good developer, a dedicated server or an account with one of the cloud services like EC2, and a nice custom Magento site. It'll last you many years through a lot of growth, sell better, and you'll avoid the headaches of switching a popular webstore with thousands of products to a new cart / server / host / datacenter.

        Prestashop, ZenCart, and OpenCart are a little lighter (VPS may be ok, depending on plugins), but definitely require configuration and/or a developer. However a lot of times you just need someone to get it all set up (one-time deal) and then you can add products and manage it.

        Wordpress -> If you get a really good developer with SECURITY experience, avoid Timthumb in all plugins and the theme, don't install any vulnerable plugins, make sure your mod_security is on and well configured, use CloudFlare, and update everything within 2 days of release (Wordpress, plugins, server software, PHP, etc) then you should be fine for up to a few hundred products on a VPS or Dedicated Server

        For under about 500 products, I would generally recommend a hosted solution. See Magento Go above.
        Signature

        We make websites load faster, clean hacks, fix errors, and more


        Wordpress help, Linux optimization, databases, custom code, web design
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7940529].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Go 2 Guy
          If you are starting out as a newbie without coding skillls and want an open source solution which can grow with you, I recommend Prestashop.

          Going live and getting your website active and productive for you can be quite quick with Prestashop. Then as you want to grow and develop the sophistication of your store Prestashop has a stack of standard features which you can implement later such as cross marketing, etc which is almost impossible to do in Wordpress if you are a newbie.

          Also, if you are starting out and want to minimize on expenses Prestashop will do you very nicely. You only need to paid out for hosting to go live with your store.

          I have just 90% built and and implemented my 1st online store using the standard theme / template with Prestashop. This store has 600+ products and about 300 more to add later. This is for an existing retail business and the 90% complete online presence has already resulted in a significant increase to retail sales of the physical store. I also like that I can add a Point of Sale module to Prestashop for about $140. This unifies inventory control for the online and physical store. Wordpress and many others can't do that.

          I may need to hire a freelance Prestashop experienced coder for some minor formatting / CSS tasks and down the track including probably an upgrade to a more responsive theme / template to better support mobile / tablet shoppers

          Initially, I spent 2 months part time reviewing & considering Wordpress & WooCommerce but had to walk away from it because it does not easily support the core marketing features of Prestashop that I saw as basic requirements for any online store. Additionally, Prestashop has a very powerful back office to manage your store for tasks such as inventory management. I found with Wordpress as you get into the project you realize you need to pay for extra modules to get features. I also realized that when live, operationally managing the back office and inventory management was going to be very time consuming with Wordpress / WooCommerce if not a nightmare in my situation. However, with Prestashop the features I need are built in as standard.

          With Prestashop you can link warehouses together, This means you can have multiple websites selling the same products or a mix of products some of which are the same or common products but this enables you to sell the same products at different prices. A very nice feature...

          Of course, if you are not selling physical products just downloadable products, then you don't have inventory requirements, so Wordpress may do you just fine.

          My summary...
          • Wordpress designed for blogging and adapted to ecommerce with plugins like WooCommerce.
          • Prestashop designed for online stores not blogging.

          I second the earlier comment on this thread in this respect.

          Personally, yes, I could and nearly did implement Wordpress but it would have been a big mistake for what I needed.

          I will say the documentation for Wordpress is better than Prestashop and there are more Youtube "How to" videos for Wordpress. Many are very well laid out with step by step instructions which is great for learning. It's all there in both Wordpress and Prestashop's documentation but key information can be a little subtle at times for a newbie.

          Next up for me are x2 Prestahop online stores with 2000 and 5000 plus products respectively. Then I will be putting a separate a blog together detailing my experiences... in Wordpress of course.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7957805].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Tweed Solutions
          I would recommend using either WooCommerce or OpenCart. Both are adequate for what you are looking for.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8309151].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author classiqa
    Magento is good for medium size business, opencart will be a good for since you have limited products. You can check volusion as well.
    Signature
    www.rightwaysolution.com
    Business Development
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7948786].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WeavingThoughts
    I prefer Wordpress for basic cart websites but for proper ecommerce it may not be the best option.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7948805].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Gonzosan
      So I'm thinking about going with Shopify for my digital downloads store. Seems like a great place and the cost isn't very high. I figure once I start making money with the store I can upgrade as well.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7950255].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author OnlineStoreHelp
        Originally Posted by Gonzosan View Post

        So I'm thinking about going with Shopify for my digital downloads store. Seems like a great place and the cost isn't very high. I figure once I start making money with the store I can upgrade as well.
        With Shopify you will need to use Fetch App since (unless they changed it) Shopify doesn't natively support downloads. That being said Fetch is fairly inexpensive and a great choice for downloads.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952280].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Gonzosan
          Originally Posted by OnlineStoreHelp View Post

          With Shopify you will need to use Fetch App since (unless they changed it) Shopify doesn't natively support downloads. That being said Fetch is fairly inexpensive and a great choice for downloads.

          Hmm I thought I replied to this before. Yes it's true I'll need an additional app for digital downloads. Shopify has their free version which didn't leave me feeling confident I would want to use it. Worst part about it is that you still need to email the content to the customer which kind of defeats the purpose in my opinion.

          Nonetheless I'm debating whether to go with Fetch or the "digital delivery" app that goes for like $20-39 a month with a 30 day trial. Fetch looked expensive 0-$500 a month but I never clicked on it to see what all that would cost. I like the fact that "Digital Delivery" has a built in affiliate system. Pretty excited to start this store this weekend. Then I can start producing and selling digital content on a weekly basis.


          *Edit* So I looked at Fetch and it is indeed much cheaper. I particularly liked the part that you can pay $10 a month and host it all yourself. Since I don't need to host anything with them that would be great. I will say that I wasn't very impressed by what Fetch showed off. Maybe it's because they don't show off a lot of the features or anything of that sort or maybe they don't even have that many to begin with. I think I'm going to use Digital delivery to start off. It has a lot of the features I wanted in a store to begin with so. It might be a little pricey but with the 30 day trial I should be able to find out if it's worth it.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7958537].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author liran68
    im gonna give shopify a try.
    thank you guys for the information i exactly wanted to decide what direction to go .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7957010].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by liran68 View Post

      im gonna give shopify a try.
      thank you guys for the information i exactly wanted to decide what direction to go .
      Just keep in mind that with Shopify you get the pleasure of paying a 1% and 2% 'transaction fee' on all orders you process with their 2 lower plans. This is on top of the payment processing fees you have to pay to your credit card processor. So even a small store that only processes $5k to $10k monthly will pay AT LEAST $50-$100 in transaction fees that you wouldn't have to pay on other platforms. BigCommerce and AmeriCommerce are very comparable carts (if not better) and they don't charge these transaction fees. I myself steer clear of Shopify because of this and never recommend it to my clients.
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8191636].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WeavingThoughts
    Will you outsource or code yourself? For DIY ease is important.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7958565].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Gonzosan
    Well I wanted to create my Shopify store this weekend after I get paid on Friday but figured I'd try them out since they have a 14 day free trial. I have to say I really love their system. It's a lot like Wordpress but much simpler. I was worried this would be a bit complicated but it's so simple. Looking forward to getting stuff up online to sell.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7960329].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author clickingkeeko
    Banned
    I'm using wordpress too. but is it really good to use magento if you have lots of products?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7960732].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author clickingkeeko
    Banned
    Using wordpress for my small eCommerce site, but i think magento is better if you have large products
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7960733].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Joshua Young
    Shopify is my favorite. Easy to set up and import a lot of product.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7969904].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author fredp
    Magento has been done with Zend Framework and is not very easy to handle for newbies but it is the most complete.
    Prestashop is easier to use if you want to run around 200 sku's, it can be a good choice...A huge community has done some add-ons to hook to it.
    Woocommerce2 is my preferred one, it is a plugin for Wordpress and is really easy to use and to customize to suit your needs.
    If you have some knowledges with Wp, I suggest you to give a try to this one
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7970194].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TanYaV
      The choice of the shopping cart is a responsible procedure. You have to consider all aspects. First of all, your skills. Different platforms require different skills. For example, Magento has everything for successful online store, but to handle this shopping cart you need strong programming knowledge.
      I'd suggest you to check this infographic to find out which solutions for ecommerce is the best for you.


      Cheers!
      Signature

      regards!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8190628].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author wakeforce139
    It's all been covered so just briefly:
    Magento does have a learning curve but it's a powerful beast. Most people don't require Magento and it is probably a more expensive solution than they need. You will need programmer assistance ($$) if you go this route or else spend months in frustration - unless of course you have the skills yourself.

    WordPress - maybe for minimal # of products. Not a huge fan of the clunky backend systems and most things you want your shop to do you will need to spend money on an add-on. If you want to do ecommerce, I urge using a platform designed around that. It does its job on smaller needs though.

    Now for my personal favorite for budget-minded ecommerce sites: PrestaShop! Some people have been throwing shouts out to it in this thread already. It's a free solution and you can get a nice looking front-end with free themes. I haven't paid for a single add-on on one of my shops and I have 9000 products loaded on it (all using the system's built-in CSV import). To be fair, there has been some tinkering and getting the import system working properly took some getting used to. I have limited knowledge on programming / CSS but I can scrape by using Google searches and other people's info. The official documentation on PS isn't great but the community has filled in all of the gaps pretty well.

    If anyone has questions about any of these platforms please let me know (post here if it's applicable to a larger audience) and I am always excited to talk ecommerce
    Signature

    Need A Feed for ANY Price Comparison Site? Message me

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8190692].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author wakeforce139
    Agree on that, every 1% in cost is another point of margin you are losing on every transaction, this also means another point you can't compete with others on. This is vital in all markets and even more so in competitive ones.
    Signature

    Need A Feed for ANY Price Comparison Site? Message me

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8191798].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Eathelin
    To make an ecommerce and shopping cart website with 100 to 200 products, you can choose WordPress eCommerce. As Magento is used when you have large number of products to display. I have personally used magento and wordpress both. But for website of less products you can go for wordpress ecommerce. Shopify is good but not simple as Wordpress.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8193400].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Silas Hart
    I used to use Prestashop for everything, and then with an update, I pretty much lost everything. Haven't returned to it since.

    Wordpress is great for small sites, it's pretty basic and it will be all you need.

    I used to Hate Shopify but when I started teaching others on how they can manage a list of inventory products they were getting from wholesale sources or were dropshipping, Shopify is very new user friendly. I've run into issues with it before on my own sites.

    I could write a friggin book about my serious love hate relationship with Magento. I loved it 4 years ago, but now I hate it. The upgrade from 1.3 to 1.4 about killed me. Literally. I had some severe anxiety by having to have development work done during the transition and had hundreds of problems with things such as API. Sometimes I wish I was using Prestashop or Shopify because they are faster. In fact, Magento has hurt my Google ranking claimed a developer I hired 2 weeks ago. I've got a couple recommendations to just switch to OpenCart, so we are looking into that now. As a business owner and poor coder, all I can say is that I've spent a LOT of money on Magento.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8229781].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author infoway
    Well, I'll recommend WordPress to build E-Commerce websites; WordPress has loads of Theme or Plugin that can help you to work with.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8245629].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ReferralCandy
    Magento and BigCommerce are great if your store is huge and you know exactly what you're doing- otherwise Shopify is probably what I'd recommend for you.

    -v
    Signature

    Measure, manage and incentivize customer referrals with ReferralCandy.

    PS: Looking to get more repeat customers for a physical store? Check out CandyBar's digital loyalty cards!

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8254443].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author webunited
    PM sent , thanks

    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8254471].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bollytintin
    I have taken time to read all the posts from the first to the last and no one mentioned Joomla and Virtuemart.

    I am s cool with virtuemart but learning Magento with Pretashop now.

    will have to look into wordpress though.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8259124].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author crescendo
    Shopify is one of the most respected ecommerce solutions on the web. Shopify enables you to build an ecommerce website in seconds, upload or import your products, market yourself and track your growth in a variety of ways and is also user friendly e-commerce platform.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8263069].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Hrkjds
    Go for Shopify. Really simple and easy to use. I am using this.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8263816].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author overtonis
      As non programmer who has done ton of research here is what i found.

      Wordpress is really bad idea for ecommerce. Its was constructed for blogs and sure there are plugins you can use but you will outgrow it quickly. I run few wordpress blogs.

      Shopify - you will find alot of guys pimping this site on here but look past it. They have oddles of hidden cost. If you have great profit margins than you could justify Shopify but with current market conditions this is NOT your best option.

      Opencart - I think if your small business who is currently developing brand identity this is your best options. Its free open source program and you can buy outer shells that will give it professional look for about $40-$50 dollars. Small learning curve to learn how to use opencart. I run two sites this way.

      Big Commerce - This is your best option for hosted ecommerce site. Less hidden cost compared to Shopify and will produce similar looking site.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8266012].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Dee Syed
    Really depends on your business model and what type of store you're thinking of. Magento, if you want e-Commerce to be the sole purpose of your site, WordPress if you want the store as well as extra functionality like blogging, articles, memberships etc. and finally Shopify if you want to spend the extra recurring cost on a hosted solution with all the technology taken care of in the back end
    Signature
    There's only one thing we do and we do it well! Talk to us about your next WordPress project and let us make it happen. Our clients have been featured on the BBC and generate income running into six figures!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8275159].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author myivushka
      I like PrestaShop - it's beauty style design, perfect module architecture, very easy interface, fast learning curve, easy to install, full enough list of free modules and it's - FREE! You need pay extra money the only for additional functionality, not needed for small stores.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8279356].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rafsco
    It depends how motivated you are.
    I had a few ecommerce sites that I knew they were tough niches and didn't want to spend money on them. I used Prestashop and loved it. osCommerce or OpenCart are too hard to customize for my level and knowledge.
    I also used Volusion and I have to say I had great Customer support.
    Shopify has a fee but I think they process CC for you, which is nice, you won't have to bother about ssl certificates and finding cc process gateway.
    Good luck.
    Signature

    Joe Falcade
    Make Money with greedyjoe.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8279977].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      I'm not going to point any fingers here, but there's a lot of misleading info in this thread! There's some really good info as well, but it's going to be impossible for someone that's new to all of this to distinguish between the good from the bad info.

      I personally have over a decade of experience in ecommerce and have had dozens and dozens of successful stores on virtually every know platform available (open source and premium/hosted). I've also mentored THOUSANDS of people in various niches using various platforms, so I have a very good idea of what's available!

      Here are the only 4 carts to strongly consider and why...

      ...BigCommerce - if you are a total newbie and don't want to get into anything too technical this is your solution. After the 2 week free trial most stores are either $25 or $40 (depending on # of SKUs) and you don't have to worry about PCI compliance, customizing files, updates, security, etc. There are very similar solutions like Shopify, AmeriCommerce & CoreCommerce, but none of them give you what BC gives you for the price!

      ...WooCommerce - if you are a bit more savvy and/or have experience with Wordpress, Woo is a solution you should strongly consider. You can achieve PCI compliance on Woo by using strictly iframed in solutions like PayPal Advanced & off-site solutions like PayPal Standard for payment processing. The one downside to Woo is it can be expensive up front because of all the add-ons you need to purchase to get you going, but after that it's free (just pay for your own hosting).

      ...Magento (original) - this is really only a solution to consider if you are either a Magento expert, willing to pay a Magento expert or are a big company looking to create a custom interface. It is a ton of work and/or really expensive to get a site off the ground with Magento, and therefore, it isn't something to consider for most small start ups. Also, if you don't use exclusively iframed in and off-site payment options with Magento, you have to go through an extensive amount of red tape to become PCI compliant!

      ...Magento Go - This is Magento's hosted solution and is a much better option than Magento for smaller stores; mainly because you don't have to worry about hosting, updates or PCI compliance. This is an up & coming platform that is gaining popularity quickly and is comparable to BigCommerce in that it's hosted so you don't have to worry about updates or security. It is the same price or slightly cheaper than BigCommerce for most stores, so that makes it a strong consideration in that area as well. The only real downside to this cart is that it has a confusing store owner interface that most people that are new to running stores will struggle to fully grasp and use!

      I hope this is helpful, and for those interested in reading more, this post is basically a condensed version of "top cart recommendations" located here.
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8283915].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author myivushka
        Thank you Dave for good comparison. As I know PCI compliance is not a problem for any of the platforms. Comparing open source PrestaShop with commerce product BigCommerce I'm personally like many customization opportunities of the PrestaShop as an open source product.

        This is an interesting comparison of the 2 platforms from Cart2Cart blog:

        Common and Distinctive Features

        "Both shopping carts have a number of similar and distinct features. So, let's list them to see how PrestaShop and BigCommerce can be compared in terms of functionality.

        Both have a strong set of store management tools, including: product, orders and inventory management systems, numerous payment and shipping options and gateways, multiple currencies, taxes and languages, single page checkout, free mobile version of a store, etc.

        Strong point of BigCommerce in this case is a default opportunity to sell via Facebook. On the other hand PrestaShop can offer a paid module to establish a Facebook shop. However, the platform can also boast of multi-store feature, an opportunity to establish several web shops and run them via one admin panel which is not available with BigCommerce.

        Marketing and search engine optimization will also become a breeze with both carts: coupon codes and discount system, wish lists and gift certificates, flexible pricing rules and newsletter, product reviews and ratings, SEO friendly links and meta tags/keywords/descriptions, etc.

        You will be also able to populate your products to eBay, Google Shopping and a lot more. BigCommerce can offer you an option of abandoned cart saver that is not available with PrestaShop. In general both solutions have approximately the same level of functionality but in case of BigCommerce it will be rather easier to configure and use.

        In terms of business analytics both carts provide powerful inbuilt analytics and full integration with Google Analytics. So you will always be aware what are your best selling products, where your traffic comes from and what is your conversion rate.

        Both carts have their own marketplace with extensions that can offer you a lot of additional features. However, PrestaShop marketplace is much bigger which is not a surprise due to the open source nature of the platform (everyone can develop and add their own modules).

        As a result it's quite obvious that both BigCommerce and Prestashop have a strong set of features and can meet virtually any needs. However, BigCommerce will be a better option for a merchants who want to concentrate strictly on their business without getting into technical part. On the other hand PrestaShop will be a better cart for technical store owner who will be able to use all the customization opportunities of the platform."
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8284476].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author kjamesnv
        Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

        ...Magento (original) - this is really only a solution to consider if you are either a Magento expert, willing to pay a Magento expert or are a big company looking to create a custom interface. It is a ton of work and/or really expensive to get a site off the ground with Magento, and therefore, it isn't something to consider for most small start ups. Also, if you don't use exclusively iframed in and off-site payment options with Magento, you have to go through an extensive amount of red tape to become PCI compliant!
        .
        I have a different perspective about Magento. Although it may be more complex than some solutions it is certainly not limited to "experts". Anyone who invests a little time can learn everything in a reasonable amount of time. There are tons of free training videos and material online.

        Regarding payments, Magento is tightly integrated with Paypal because they share the same parent company (eBay). We use Paypal Professional which is equivalent to a merchant account with very competitive rates. It's PCI compliant and can be set up in a few minutes. There was no "red tape" whatsoever. Authorize.net is also supported however I do not have any personal experience with it.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8292819].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
          Originally Posted by kjamesnv View Post

          I have a different perspective about Magento. Although it may be more complex than some solutions it is certainly not limited to "experts". Anyone who invests a little time can learn everything in a reasonable amount of time. There are tons of free training videos and material online.
          Right, which is far too much of a time commitment for someone wanting to launch their store NOW! The reason I recommend BigCommerce to people that are new to ecommerce or wanting to test out a market is because it's quicker & easier! In a fraction of the time it takes to set up a store on Magento, you can do so on BC. Heck, you could have your free trial store up and mostly configured in BC in less time than it would take to set up web hosting for a self-hosted store!

          I love Magento and it certainly has it's place, it's just not the ideal solution for people that are new or wanting to build out a store quickly.

          Originally Posted by kjamesnv View Post

          Regarding payments, Magento is tightly integrated with Paypal because they share the same parent company (eBay). We use Paypal Professional which is equivalent to a merchant account with very competitive rates. It's PCI compliant and can be set up in a few minutes. There was no "red tape" whatsoever. Authorize.net is also supported however I do not have any personal experience with it.
          The only way to be PCI compliant on ANY self-hosted software that stores or transmits CC details is to:

          a) Use an off-site solution (like PayPal Standard) or iframe in a solution (like PayPal Advanced)!

          OR

          b) go through the agonizing process of getting your platform AND your hosting server to pass PCI compliance screening (which is something I've gone through before, and I don't wish it upon anyone!).

          So yes, you can be PCI compliant on Magento (even though it's self-hosted) as long as you go with one of those 2 options above.

          Again, much quicker and easier to get set up with BC. You are talking a total of 2 minutes to integrate PayPal Standard AND your merchant account in BC.
          Signature
          StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
          My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8296759].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author kjamesnv
            Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

            The only way to be PCI compliant on ANY self-hosted software that stores or transmits CC details is to:

            a) Use an off-site solution (like PayPal Standard) or iframe in a solution (like PayPal Advanced)!

            OR

            b) go through the agonizing process of getting your platform AND your hosting server to pass PCI compliance screening (which is something I've gone through before, and I don't wish it upon anyone!).

            So yes, you can be PCI compliant on Magento (even though it's self-hosted) as long as you go with one of those 2 options above.
            Just to clarify, Paypal Pro is PCI complaint and is directly integrated into Magento. The consumer is not redirected to a 3rd party site and nothing is iFramed.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8296834].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
              Originally Posted by kjamesnv View Post

              Just to clarify, Paypal Pro is PCI complaint and is directly integrated into Magento. The consumer is not redirected to a 3rd party site and nothing is iFramed.
              It's not really that simple. PPPP may be PCI compliant and Magento's software may be PCI compliant, but if you are transmitting credit card details to another server, your HOSTING must also be PCI compliant.
              Signature
              StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
              My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8297249].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author ScooterDaMan
                Really, a lot of this decision comes down to the size of your store, the payment processor you are using, how well they and the hosting company mesh together with PCI compliance and whether you feel like dealing with this stuff.

                If you have 10,000 products, it may be worth your while to chase your tail with a non-hosted solution - especially if it is a new store and you aren't making any money yet.

                With smaller stores, it's nice knowing that you never even have to think about this stuff with BC - especially for newbies. If you have less than 100 products, why would you want to deal with it to save $10-15?

                I build niche and even micro-niche stores so none of my websites have more than 100 products. BigCommerce is the perfect solution for me. I never have to worry about updates or any of this PCI compliance nonsense. Like everything concerning shopping carts, though, everybody is going to have a different perspective based upon what their individual needs are.
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8297320].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author kjamesnv
                Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

                It's not really that simple. PPPP may be PCI compliant and Magento's software may be PCI compliant, but if you are transmitting credit card details to another server, your HOSTING must also be PCI compliant.
                Yes- Excellent point.
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8297325].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author thetopham
                  I use Miva Merchant but am looking at other options. 9,000 sku's, inventory is HUGE MESS FROM THE LAST WEBMASTER! Categories are all over the place, multiple categories for the same thing, absolute chaos. /endrant
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8298422].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author leokoo
        Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

        I'm not going to point any fingers here, but there's a lot of misleading info in this thread! There's some really good info as well, but it's going to be impossible for someone that's new to all of this to distinguish between the good from the bad info.

        I personally have over a decade of experience in ecommerce and have had dozens and dozens of successful stores on virtually every know platform available (open source and premium/hosted). I've also mentored THOUSANDS of people in various niches using various platforms, so I have a very good idea of what's available!

        Here are the only 4 carts to strongly consider and why...

        ...BigCommerce - if you are a total newbie and don't want to get into anything too technical this is your solution. After the 2 week free trial most stores are either $25 or $40 (depending on # of SKUs) and you don't have to worry about PCI compliance, customizing files, updates, security, etc. There are very similar solutions like Shopify, AmeriCommerce & CoreCommerce, but none of them give you what BC gives you for the price!

        ...WooCommerce - if you are a bit more savvy and/or have experience with Wordpress, Woo is a solution you should strongly consider. You can achieve PCI compliance on Woo by using strictly iframed in solutions like PayPal Advanced & off-site solutions like PayPal Standard for payment processing. The one downside to Woo is it can be expensive up front because of all the add-ons you need to purchase to get you going, but after that it's free (just pay for your own hosting).

        ...Magento (original) - this is really only a solution to consider if you are either a Magento expert, willing to pay a Magento expert or are a big company looking to create a custom interface. It is a ton of work and/or really expensive to get a site off the ground with Magento, and therefore, it isn't something to consider for most small start ups. Also, if you don't use exclusively iframed in and off-site payment options with Magento, you have to go through an extensive amount of red tape to become PCI compliant!

        ...Magento Go - This is Magento's hosted solution and is a much better option than Magento for smaller stores; mainly because you don't have to worry about hosting, updates or PCI compliance. This is an up & coming platform that is gaining popularity quickly and is comparable to BigCommerce in that it's hosted so you don't have to worry about updates or security. It is the same price or slightly cheaper than BigCommerce for most stores, so that makes it a strong consideration in that area as well. The only real downside to this cart is that it has a confusing store owner interface that most people that are new to running stores will struggle to fully grasp and use!

        I hope this is helpful, and for those interested in reading more, this post is basically a condensed version of "top cart recommendations" located here.
        Thanks Dave. I've invested in most of WooCommerce's plugin before they shifted to the SAAS model (software as a service), meaning I don't need to pay a single cent for 95% of my extensions. Still, WooCommerce gives me a mighty secure platform (added on with an auto plugin update, and live backup from Vaultpress, which only cost $ 15/month)

        But yes, everyone keeps saying WooCommerce & Wordpress isn't good enough. Why is that so? Could you advice?

        Magento Weaknesses
        1) Slow and Heavy

        2) Upgrading issues (some carts break after upgrading)

        3) Extensions are expensive - some needs renewal after 90 days! Crazy. Especially for small timers like us

        4) Not all extensions are upgraded when you upgrade your store to the latest version!

        OpenCart & Prestashop's weaknesses
        1) Not all extensions gets upgraded to the latest version. You will lose some functionality. We did. And it was frustrating.
        Also, out of 13k of OpenCart's Extensions, only 4.1k works with version 1.5.6.4

        2) Prestashop's AddOns are also expensive

        3) OpenCart's going the way of 50% renewal / year when version 2.0 is launched - in comparison, our WooCommerce Extensions are on lifetime, remember?

        4) OpenCart's Extension Directory is in a mess, with many spammers and resellers of the same code. Horror of horrors.


        WooCommerce Weaknesses
        1) It's not secure? - Are you sure? It runs some of the most widely visited sites in the world, including some hitting 2 to 5 million unique visitors/day (read Smashing Magazine)

        2) It's hard to process so many products at a time - Get the Stock Management Plugin

        3) It's a blogging platform - No, it's a CMS. And a very secure one. Much more secure than some dedicated shopping carts, I might add

        4) It's only good for small shops, less than 1000 products - Why?
        a) You cannot upload too many products?
        That isn't true. Some of the largest WooCommerce stores have more than 30k of products on them, and still run well.

        b) It's based on Wordpress?
        Wordpress is basically based on PHP & SQL. Facebook itself is based php and SQL, and Wordpress.com is a multisite with thousands of blogs, and is also based on php and SQL. All you need for a heavy store is more RAM and more processing speed. With Load Balancers thrown in when you get more traffic

        c) Not easy to process hundreds of orders/day
        Are you sure? We get our customers to send us the banking details, and Paypal auto does some of that for us. And then we process the order.

        On the other hand, advantages of WooCommerce are

        1) Woothemes will develop the WooCommerce extensions over time. Extensions from WooCommerce are guaranteed to work with the latest version of WooCommerce and Wordpress. (at least 99% of the time)
        2) You don't lose functionality for crucial WooCommerce extensions, unlike OpenCart, Prestashop and Magento

        Can someone else show me the weaknesses of WooCommerce? Please show comparison photos or something similar. I'm tired of people saying that WooCommerce is good for small shops. Where's your proof?
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9282925].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
          leokoo, you make a lot of good points, but please keep in mind that WooCommerce has made some massive improvements since my post above. In fact, a lot of major vulnerabilities were patched in their last major update. Also, more woo-compatible plugins have been released, and a lot of the existing ones were massively improved upon as well.

          FYI, I use Woo for several web stores currently so I am extremely familiar with it.

          There are still 2 shortcomings of Woo in my opinion though:

          1) It has its share of bugs and lacks in some usability features. I have had to get programmers to customize my Woo build to make it more robust and give me more control. I also find that just about any woo-compatible plugin I install has bugs or just doesn't do everything I want it to do. I hate having to pour money into them to make them work how they should work in the first place.

          2) PCI compliance. This is something that's kind of gotten lost in the shuffle recently, and hasn't been getting talked about a lot lately, but it still exists and is still a legitimate concern. You absolutely cannot use a payment module that stores or transfers info from your self-hosted website without jumping through an extensive amount of hoops to become "compliant." Without going through that process, you are stuck using off-site processors (i.e. paypal or google checkout) or solutions where the payment form is "iframed" into your website (i.e. PayPal Advanced).

          In short, I love WooCommerce, but only for certain situations. We like BigCommerce for traditional ecommerce stores and have our own customized build of WP/Woo for affiliate product stores.
          Signature
          StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
          My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9284885].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Search83
    I like Big commerce. You can also try shopping cart elite. SCE has a alot of built in SEO tools which is great for a novice user. Big commerce was affordable, easy to use and had good customer support.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8285701].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
    I think Magento and BigCommerce are excellent if your shop is large and you know exactly what you're doing.
    Signature

    AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8299063].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author eiilers
    BigCommerce all the way. I have 5 bigcommerce stores currently - it's the best.
    Signature
    Steve Eilers
    Boost Marketing Group LLC
    www.boostGR.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8300115].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    FYI, Miva merchant is absolutely AWFUL!! I rate them down with Yahoo Store as the most outdated and limiting cart platforms on the web. If you are on either, I recommend moving to something else ASAP!
    Signature
    StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
    My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8301797].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author veende
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8302939].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
      Magento is definitely AWFUL!! I amount them down with Google Shop as the most obsolete and restricting trolley systems on the web.
      Signature

      AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8309355].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author marco005
      Hi warriors,

      is magento not to complicated to handle? Design the template,import all your products???

      I speak only for me,these csv file import thing,is to complicated for me,sorry.When I read it on shopify tutorials I get headache.....

      The csv files are not uniform,every Importer/Manufacturer has its own format.....and then you get errors when you import the products in all systems,Joomla,Gambio,Opencart......and so on...

      I need an easy to handle and understand shopsystem+easy to handle product import.

      So is Prestashop worth a try for me or Magento?

      best wishes
      marco005
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9173827].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author kjamesnv
        Originally Posted by marco005 View Post

        Hi warriors,

        is magento not to complicated to handle? Design the template,import all your products???

        I need an easy to handle and understand shopsystem+easy to handle product import.

        So is Prestashop worth a try for me or Magento?

        best wishes
        marco005
        Magento does have a learning curve. Its not a simple platform. But investing time learning Magento is worth it especially if you are serious about ecommerce.

        If you want something simple and easy Magento probably isn't the answer (maybe look at Shopify or Big Commerce)

        Magento does have an import feature that is OK. Its definitely not its best feature but it works.

        As far as designing a template this is not something I recommend unless you are a web designer. Its much easier to buy a nice template from ThemeForest.com. There are 100's to choose from.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9173917].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author girmal5
    i say magento for more than 1k products
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8302947].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MLMAnswerMan
    Someone asked me to suggest a website builder with shopping cart. I see many websites seem to look like they go straight to shopping cart versus traditional website. I don't have any experience so need some help here as I need to learn anyways....
    I buy all my URLs from Godaddy and I know they have a builder and shopping cart, is theirs any good? Is there shopping cart their own or one of the others that may have been mentioned here?

    Friend wants to build a website to sell clothing and would build this up overtime as he deals with many distributors that each have 1,000s of pieces.

    Thanks.
    Signature

    Robert
    Moderator's Note: Affiliate link not allowed

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8303449].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rahuljainjp
    As per my personal experience, I would suggest Magento. Magento community is growing too fast and people are really making awesome extensions for magento. If you would choose any other eCommerce platform now, you will definitely have to return back to Magento after 2-3 years. So its better to start now..

    Thanks,
    Rahul
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8304060].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Young Gun
    I was lucky enough to have a friend of mine build a custom software. It has all the needed features for an online eCommerce store without all the bloat.

    PM me if you are interested in it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8304193].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MLMAnswerMan
    Thanks Young Gun and Rahuljainjp,

    Has anyone have any experience or comments for the one on Godaddy. It does seem easy with drag and drop and prebuilt templates BUT is it any good. The price seems right.

    Thanks for any help here.
    Signature

    Robert
    Moderator's Note: Affiliate link not allowed

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8304557].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author maestro2010
    Magento is a incredible Ecommerce Software, but you should have Magento optimized server for better performance.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8304659].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mevora
    Shopofy is fast and very good design..
    Wordpress is flexible !
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8307452].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JDMellow
    I'd suggest you to check this slideshow Shopping Cart Types
    if you are at the cross-roads and don't know which shopping cart to choose.
    On my opinion, Magento has many strong sides to make your store profitable. On the other hand, it requires programming skill.
    If you're not good at programming, it's better to choose hosted solutions, such as Shopify, BigCommerce, Volusion etc. These shopping carts are easy to install and have user-friendly admin panels.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8317818].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
      I would suggest using either Shopofy or OpenCart. Both are sufficient for what you are looking and it is quick and very excellent style..
      Signature

      AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8318125].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
    great ,Woocommerce is a highly effective FREE eCommerce plug-in for WordPress.
    Signature

    AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8338000].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amcg
    If you're starting out, I'd go with something hosted like Shopify. Once you've got selling good at selling inventory, pricing, marketing and off course a customer base, you can move to something self-hosted like OpenCart.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8338210].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
      On my viewpoint, Magento has many powerful factors to make your shop successful. However, it needs development expertise.
      it's better to select organised alternatives, such as Shopify, BigCommerce,etc These purchasing trolleys are easy to set up and have user-friendly administration sections.
      Signature

      AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8341878].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kimjoshi
    Magento is the undisputed eCommerce web development application. Magento development is considered as the best option due to its uncountable features.Other web development tools do not stand a chance in-front of Magento as it offers a class apart and highly functional shopping cart.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8363698].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author AAAWebstore
      Magento group is increasing too quick and individuals are really creating amazing additions.
      Signature

      AAAWebstore is one of the leading Web design and development company that delivers technology driven business solutions that meet strategic purposes of our customers. We believe in delivering targeted solutions that not only serves the service need but also helps in overall business development.Contact for Ecommerce development and Designing

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8363908].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jones115
    Banned
    I would advise WordPress.
    1. Thousands of free themes for eCommerce. It takes literally some clicks to change appearance of your webstore totally.
    2. Perfect for entrance level. User-friendly interface rules.
    3. A lot of useful plugins for eCommerce.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391534].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rcobbett
    This was my first website, which we ran on OpenCart, it worked well for me. approx 100 products. Very simple effective software system. Developers love it because its simple, and you can easily find people on odesk willing to customise it how you want it for a few bucks an hour. That website turned over 800k in its first year, generated profits 700k. Opencart does the job perfectly.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8459892].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by rcobbett View Post

      This was my first website, which we ran on OpenCart, it worked well for me. approx 100 products. Very simple effective software system. Developers love it because its simple, and you can easily find people on odesk willing to customise it how you want it for a few bucks an hour. That website turned over 800k in its first year, generated profits 700k. Opencart does the job perfectly.
      Really, your profit margin was over 90%!? Were you manufacturing illegal drugs and getting them delivered to clients free, some how?
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8465477].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author teeds01
    I think we get lost in Ecommerce systems vs. their purpose - to make money. Magento Community Edition is great for driving revenue in Ebay and Amazon (you CAN NOT post 100+ products at a time with WooCommerce.) The biggest point is to get started - sell crap - see what works. I'd experiment with products using BigCommerce just because you should be able to get something live in a few hours.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8460830].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author trusodesign
    i love wordpress if the product is below 1k, but if more, better to use magento.
    Signature

    Wory Kharisma
    ---------------
    C.E.O Truso Design

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8463442].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author VapeStore
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned this yet, unless I missed it. Look out for bandwith limits, they can really add up and I read some horror stories about overage fees, especially with Volusion. I know for a fact BigCommerce and Shopify both offer unlimited bandwith in even their basic plans.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8499693].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author koreahallyu
    I use wordpress & Woo Commerce with more than 1000 products, without pain! People still thinking we cannot make a good store with wordpress should wake up!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8501408].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author VapeStore
      Originally Posted by koreahallyu View Post

      I use wordpress & Woo Commerce with more than 1000 products, without pain! People still thinking we cannot make a good store with wordpress should wake up!
      Hey man, I was considering WooCommerce, tell me this though, does it cost extra to set up a payment gateway processor for paypal, credit cards, dwolla, etc. like with a plug-in or something?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8503028].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SandraLarkin
    Banned
    Magento. It can be extremely complicated, but once you get the hang of it, it is hands down the best. You can do literally anything with it ecommerce.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8504502].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author OliverTrent
    It really depends on what you want, and can work with.

    Shopify is great if you want to just get a store up quickly. Wordpress is a good intermediate solution. Platforms like Magneto can be a bit daunting, but there is a lot of documentation out there.
    Signature

    Lover of Ecommerce at eComLab.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8507050].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kata OS
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    I am an experienced user of shopping cart software. I used to have Magento cart. I have two online stores and I had a person who helped me to set up these stores. Now I use the AbanteCart and I manage all my stores myself! Everything work well!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8588016].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author easyn ip camera
    I think if you are not a tech pro
    Shopify magento go bigcommerce may a good option
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8590506].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author waroftheflea
    Take a look at a new shopping cart solution - tictail. It is the tumblr of ecommerce apparently. Looks very like shopify but with no % sale fee. Anyone used it?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8590638].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author VishalBhatt123
    According to my point of view, Magento is the best option for developing the eCommerce store. If you have only 200 products for selling or 1000+ products for selling.
    None of persons are use WordPress for developing an eCommerce store.
    From Magento and shopify, you can choose Magento because below reason...
    For more information visit https://medium.com/magento-commerce-...s/debd5fc1b846
    Signature
    M-Connect Media an eCommerce Development Company
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8630224].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author aceriker
    WordPress is focused more on blogging and it is not that safe to open an eCommerce website in WordPress Magento is for heavy weight eCommerce website. If you have many products, then you can go for it. Shopify is the best way to develop a eCommerce website easily . OpenCart is also provides you to create a website easily.After developing a website, if you want to customize according to your needs and your target audience expectations, then opt for Agriya's open source customization services.
    Signature

    Interested to develop booking and rental website then choose booking software , popular in developing clone script like groupon and airbnb clone

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8754782].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author nicholas28
    I suggest you Magento, its open-source ecommerce, its give you lots of features,
    it is simple, quick and versatile, which makes it easy for customers to search and purchase products. Magento offers users with highly interactive shopping experience and its SEO friendly.
    Signature

    Gowebbaby Provide 360° Result Driven Web Design Services, ECommerce Websites, Online Marketing & Mobile App Development With Guaranteed Web Visitors.
    Hire interactive eCommerce developer and designer for Magento, Amazon Webstore and Wordpress or any CMS of your choice.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8790458].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Singlepile
    I use magento. It works great and has lots of extensions. You can export products feed easily, set up google dynamic remarketing, add shareasale tracking code, etc.
    Signature

    I am sexy and I know it.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9174630].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author malik4u7861
    I Recommend the wo commerce website this is easy to use and reliable user friendly
    Signature

    midrees

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9175940].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author asepkomara
    another vote for Magento. period.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9178320].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author anandshaw
      I will go for Prestashop or Magento(bigger server, cost++)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9187818].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sidiniquity
    Look, it comes down to this - 'free and open source' (save money, spend time) or 'paid and hosted' (save time, spend money).

    If you want to be handling your site setup, hosting, and other technical details go with free and open source such as Wordpress+Woocommerce or Magento.

    If you don't want to do that, you can save yourself the time and hassle, but obviously at a cost, and use Shopify or Bigcommerce.

    I don't know why people are putting Shopify and Magento in the same bucket. That's like calling Facebook Ads and Google Ads the same thing because they are both advertising platforms. Different ball games.
    Signature

    Learn how to start and scale your own e-commerce store - www.openastorenow.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9188167].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tantykimi
    I've heard Opencart is one of the best options when it comes to build an eCommerce site. I guess WordPress is pretty good as well, but Opencart was made for that purpose.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9188218].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tom Evans
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    Basically the difference between these are:

    Magento:
    Magento is a platform that keeps developers and designers in mind. It has a high degree of customizability, and you can do really cool things with it if you have the technical knowledge, which includes intermediate to advanced understanding of HTML/CSS/PHP. Magento Go is a more accessible program that is built to compete with BigCommerce and Shopify, but it has limited template and customization options.

    Features

    • Multi-store capabilities
    • Rapid bug fixes and code updates
    • Large library of templates, including third party options
    • Advanced and highly customizable
    • Excellent reporting and inventory management options
    • Large library of plugins, including third party options
    • SEO tools: SEO-friendly URLs, meta titles and descriptions
    • Marketing tools: email campaigns, targeted pricing and suggested items, integrated email marketing, product reviews
    • Conversion tools: Powerful product search, intuitive shopping menus, multiple payment and shipment options
    • Mobile device enabled; shopping cart carries over multiple devices
    • International shipping, pricing, taxing, etc.

    Shopify:
    Shopify is one of the easiest-to-use eCommerce platforms on the market. This program is user-friendly and versatile; you can get your shop up and running right away without any trouble. With Shopify, you can easily build a great-looking website that looks excellent across devices, whether it is viewed on a desktop, laptop, tablet, or smart phone. However, when it comes to building a simple store in a short amount of time for the business that is short on time and technical know-how, Shopify is a great program.

    Features


    • Takes away hosting, SSL & security worries
    • CMS capability: it can publish articles and blog posts
    • Very easy to set up; drag-and-drop product page and collection page creations
    • Easy to make limited customization (beyond that though, watch out for limitations and "Liquid" issues)
    • Store automatically updates with new software
    • Conversion tools: multiple payment options, Free Shipping coupon tool
    • Marketing tools: SEO keyword tag suggestions, SEO meta tags, Google Analytics, email marketing
    • Incredibly simple to setup products (customization requires knowledge of "Liquid" so beware)
    • A little under 200 templates to choose from
    • Conversion tools: Discount codes
    • Great customer support, excellent community forums

    Wordpress:
    WordPress is a popular open source publishing tool and content management system. It is more suited for smaller online merchants, or for selling products within a content-rich website or blog.

    Features:

    • Budget is limited.
    • Only want to sell a small range of products and don't have any specific requirements in regards to order fulfillment
    • You already use WordPress and want a store added to it without having to start from scratch
    • Your store is only a small part of your website.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9194137].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author repricerexpress
    Different horses for different courses!! Your needs will be specific to you so it's worth trying out at least 3 trials to see which feels right. Honestly, even if one is technically more suited to your business than another, you'll never get there if you don't like using it, so with all their bells and whistles, it can sometimes come down to which you like best. That's not overly technical, but it is the truth. And you can always change your platform in the future if your needs change--choose what's right for you now, not the one you think you'll need in five years when you're selling millions!!
    Signature
    Amazon repricing software that helps you win the Buy Box more often. eBay repricing also available.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9194890].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Etoot
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9285246].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by Etoot View Post

      3) Magento is best option for all types of eCommerce sites.
      I totally disagree... IMO, Magento sucks! It's dated, bulky and a total resource hog!
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9286223].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Solid Commerce
    I would take a look at Bigcommerce and see how you like them.

    I'm not sure about your level of experience, but I know that a lot of our clients here at Solid Commerce -- from novices to seasoned professionals -- have had super positive experience using Bigcommerce.

    It's very easy to deal with, and they've got a ton of really pretty themes that are simple to install right out of the box. What's more is that many of them are responsive, which is HUGE for an eCommerce site, considering how much shopping is done on mobile devices and tablets these days.

    Hope this helps!
    Signature

    _ Sean B.
    Solid Commerce

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9287681].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author huynhicq
    I would have few questions:

    Im starting up with very few products. Mainly I want to web that people can look at how many products I have and place order. Since my country doesn't support much type of payment so I only want place order without payment, shopify doesn't work in my country, ecwid seems to be ok on my Facebook page. I want something as simple as ecwid on my Facebook page: display the product and place order.

    I have no idea about code. I can learn how to use tools. So what website should I use? I didnt pay for shopify because I don't want to pay for something that I can't use.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9307943].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Ryce
      Originally Posted by huynhicq View Post

      I would have few questions:

      Im starting up with very few products. Mainly I want to web that people can look at how many products I have and place order. Since my country doesn't support much type of payment so I only want place order without payment, shopify doesn't work in my country, ecwid seems to be ok on my Facebook page. I want something as simple as ecwid on my Facebook page: display the product and place order.

      I have no idea about code. I can learn how to use tools. So what website should I use? I didnt pay for shopify because I don't want to pay for something that I can't use.
      you can use shopify for free during the 14 days trial period
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9323730].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DamianGil
    Much of it depends on your specific needs, technical abilities, budget. There's no overall best for every site. Some people prefer one to another for one or another reason.

    However the rule of thumb is that if you run a small to mid size store (up to around 1M bucks), Wordpress is a safe bet through WooCommerce.

    A really big store would run better on Drupal or some eCommerce specific CMS like Magento.

    Also, if the business also has a click and mortar side, you want some POS integration, and Wordpress suffers from this. Options are average at best.

    If you want the closest to "set it and forget it" then Shopify is the best shot.

    Personally I'm a big WooCommerce fan and I love it over Magento, ZenCart and others. However I don't have any POS needs so I don't care much about the lack of good options.

    Also because WP and WooCommerce themes/plugins are usually optimized from SEO I don't care much about it much. In other eCommerce tools, having good SEO can be quite expensive.

    But again, it all depends on your needs. It would be better to address your specific needs and plans for the future to an expert to have a precise recommendation. If you would want mine feel free to PM no strings attached.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9321786].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9323749].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author suredone
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9341781].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Solid Commerce
      Originally Posted by suredone View Post

      If you're selling your products on marketplaces like eBay, Amazon, Etsy, or Google Shopping take a look at SureDone, it's a multichannel platform that includes a fully customizable storefront out of the box.

      The pricing is straightforward, $199, $299, $599 with no transaction fees, no contracts, $0 setup, and 30 day money back guarantee. It will cut your listing time down if you're a powerseller, want to try Amazon or need a prostores alternative.

      IMO, BigCommerce, Shopify, Wordpress & Magento are great platforms if you're not managing a lot of products, or don't use marketplaces.

      Yelena from SureDone (SureDone - Multi Channel Ecommerce Solution | Sell on eBay, Amazon, Google)
      Psst - Yelena. Word to the wise:

      WarriorForum doesn't dig it when you post advertisements that aren't directly in response to questions being asked in the thread. Doing stuff like this will get ALL of us banned, which is no good for anyone.

      Just a friendly heads-up -- the WarriorForum overlords like it when you stay all the way on topic.

      (Also, the fine folks reading and participating on WarriorForum like it better, too -- answering honest questions with unrelated sales pitches really drags down the quality of the content in these boards. Try to help everyone out, yeah?)
      Signature

      _ Sean B.
      Solid Commerce

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9346148].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author James1212
    I use woo commerce and wordpress, they work fine. I use a theme called Blanco by eight themes good support. You can find them at theme forest.
    Welcome to Wear it And Bare It Lingerie
    Signature

    Mike Schlecht

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9345946].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Linnworks
    Depends on the business needs and budget but... Magento is a good all rounder.

    WooCommerce I personally think is great if you have a low budget or are a small business but it lacks the flexibility and the potential that Magento has.

    Magento also offer a free version called community.

    Shopify, BigCommerce, ekmPowershop and Volusion are also very popular carts.

    You also have other carts like ZenCart, Open Cart, CS Cart, 3D cart; all of which in my early days of ecommerce I was quite a fan off and are still very good.

    If you have any ecommerce questions, please feel free to message me and I'll happily give you my advice.

    All the best,

    Charlie McBroom

    e-commerce specialist at Linnworks
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9349600].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author fernandocortes
    Shopify is easy to use and you can be up and running in minutes
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9352903].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rafsco
    I think there is not an answer. It all depends on your knowledge, drive, and how far you want to take your store. I use Prestashop, I am used with it and I like it, can do everything i need. But it really depends. Now is too late, but if I could I would go with Shopify, they process the CC payments and it looks a nice platform to me. If you decide to go with a free cart, keep in mind you'll need a SSL certificate to accept CC (around 70-80 bucks/year). For CC gateway I use Stripe, although majority of my customers use PayPal.
    My two cents: make sure you can import and export your items with a csv file, especially export. If one day you decide to change software you'll have all the listings almost ready.
    Signature

    Joe Falcade
    Make Money with greedyjoe.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9354415].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9366576].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Double Q
    i ve tried osCommerece , not good at all

    magento is pretty good
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9379069].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author toabhi6
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    OpenCart is the best for small websites...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9772558].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    OpenCart is "okay" (at best) for small to medium ecomm sites IMO. It's probably the best open source solution out there, but since it is open source you are limited to "iframed in" or off-site payment processors (to avoid PCI compliance issues) and you get to deal with installing plugins & updates.

    IMHO small (and even medium) ecomm stores are best off using a hosted solution like BigCommerce or 3DCart where they don't have to deal with anything technical and can focus on user experience and marketing.

    Magnento is a cumbersome mess of a platform and should only be considered by bigger companies that need a very customized solution and have the capital to invest in massive amounts of development. Even then I'd still look at a hosted enterprise solution or OpenCart before considering Magento.
    Signature
    StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
    My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9773410].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BlackWoods
    Greatly depend on your budget and how far you plan to go.
    Hosted solution is a good start as it is mostly straight-forward and user friendly, but as time goes by you will realize it couldn't deliver up to your demand and you just couldn't do anything about it.

    If you are not a lone ranger and you do have some skills in code, Open Source is a good way to go.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9773684].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alice54
    I will recommend you to use PrestaShop as it's the best for small business. But it will be more beneficial for you to use Magento because there are different companies who are providing hundred of extensions which allow you to modify your store according to your choice just like Top Magento Extensions.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9773845].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author vanderland
    Does anybody here have experience with Drupal Commerce? I have used Drupal for diferent purposes, and also created a Drupal Commerce Store for test, it look easy and powerfull from my perspective, but I am curios to know how successful it would be especially with the Dropshiping method.

    I host everything on my own, so I have lots of flexibility.

    Thanks
    Van Der
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9781130].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KylePeters
    Hey gang,

    I already have a shared hostgator account, and wondering if some warriors can help me decide whether it would be better for me to use woo-commerce with wordpress on my shared hostgator hosting?.. or get something like BigCommerce(29.95)?

    In my wordpress site, I already us the following levels of protection, and speed in my .htaccess file =>

    protect from sql injection, Secure Access to WP-LOGIN, block files from being browsed, and WPSuperCache, and Expire images header.

    Plus i have flexsqueeze theme, and they just upgraded to a new version which is Woo Commerce compatible...

    So, I'm a little torn between choosing from woo commerce(free) or bigcommerce(29.95)..? And if warriors can give their thoughts, I'd greatly appreciate it.

    Many Thanks,
    Kyle
    Signature
    Some cool Graphic web design services and training courses!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9798497].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by KylePeters View Post

      Hey gang,

      I already have a shared hostgator account, and wondering if some warriors can help me decide whether it would be better for me to use woo-commerce with wordpress on my shared hostgator hosting?.. or get something like BigCommerce(29.95)?

      In my wordpress site, I already us the following levels of protection, and speed in my .htaccess file =>

      protect from sql injection, Secure Access to WP-LOGIN, block files from being browsed, and WPSuperCache, and Expire images header.

      Plus i have flexsqueeze theme, and they just upgraded to a new version which is Woo Commerce compatible...

      So, I'm a little torn between choosing from woo commerce(free) or bigcommerce(29.95)..? And if warriors can give their thoughts, I'd greatly appreciate it.

      Many Thanks,
      Kyle
      Kyle, in my opinion it depends on your experience level and how much you are willing to handle your own technical stuff. We generally go with (and recommend) hosted solutions like BigCommerce & 3DCart simply because we don't like to spend time installing plugins, doing updates and tweaking the theme after the latest update. We would much rather spend a bit each month for our cart and save that time so it can be dedicated to more important things like driving more traffic to our web store!
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com - FREE TRAINING - Learn How to Build Your Own eCommerce Website
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox Business News, the NY Times & Flippa
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9800623].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author KylePeters
        Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

        Kyle, in my opinion it depends on your experience level and how much you are willing to handle your own technical stuff. We generally go with (and recommend) hosted solutions like BigCommerce & 3DCart simply because we don't like to spend time installing plugins, doing updates and tweaking the theme after the latest update. We would much rather spend a bit each month for our cart and save that time so it can be dedicated to more important things like driving more traffic to our web store!
        I actually just signed up for the free 14 day trial at bigcommerce.
        Signature
        Some cool Graphic web design services and training courses!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9801095].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mariaf10
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9798900].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Lin
    Thanks for sharing your valuable opinion guys! Since I am a start up with low budget I would love to go with Prestashop.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9801663].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author PriyaKapoor
    If you are planning to just starting up, then shopify is good.
    If you are planning for middle level, then wordpress is good.
    and, yes, if you are planning for the bigger startup with a lot more traffic, then Magento is the best choice.
    If you want more information and support in website, then just visit on Nationkart website.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9805686].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author leokoo
      Originally Posted by PriyaKapoor View Post

      If you are planning to just starting up, then shopify is good.
      If you are planning for middle level, then wordpress is good.
      and, yes, if you are planning for the bigger startup with a lot more traffic, then Magento is the best choice.
      If you want more information and support in website, then just visit on Nationkart website.
      Actually, if you have sales from USD 1 to 5 million onwards/year, you might want to invest in real, quality ecommerce solutions like
      1) Demandware
      2) Hybris

      Magento, Prestashop and WooCommerce are for small businesses. Don't listen to those Magento developers who want to push their expensive maintenance fees For small companies, Magento, Prestashop, Opencart and WooCommerce are about the same.

      That's why we recommend WooCommerce.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9820792].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author leokoo
      Originally Posted by PriyaKapoor View Post

      If you are planning to just starting up, then shopify is good.
      If you are planning for middle level, then wordpress is good.
      and, yes, if you are planning for the bigger startup with a lot more traffic, then Magento is the best choice.
      If you want more information and support in website, then just visit on Nationkart website.
      Why don't you list the price? Please don't be a troll and try to convert readers to an expensive cart with 2 million lines of code
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9985424].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bizoppmaster
    Shopify all the way, it's an absolute monster. You can do so much with it because of all the apps available and it's super stable so you wont have any down time like you might have with your own server if you used Wordpress as an example.
    Signature
    (4) Spots Left For Private Coaching | TheProfitCoach.com | Skype: jon.mac303
    [URL="http://theprofitcoach.com/facebook/"]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9874144].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mrdeflation
    But with Shopify wouldnt you have problems with SEO/Rankings due to all the domains being on their same server ?? Figure for SEO purposes it would be better to run woocommerce
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9892117].message }}
  • Prestashop is a good alternative.
    But if you have too many products you would want to get a reliable software like Magento.
    Signature
    YOUR FB ADS ACCOUNT WAS CLOSED? >>>>I GOT A SOLUTION<<<< CONTACT ME
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9892214].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    I know a company doing over $20mm per year and they use wordpress and ultracart. The only gripe they have is that it's not great for mobile. They don't have a lot of products though, just a lot of transactions.
    Signature
    How to Build LARGE EMAIL LISTS on a Budget and MONETIZE Like a PRO
    20 Years Exp . . . . . . . . . . . . Email - CPA - PPL
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9892505].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jackshoes
    I think Word press is best option, because word press is very easy to use and manage. You just need to install some good plug in, then your website will work very good and there is no time consuming feature in word press then install the plug-in wpe commerce. This plug in is very simple to use and this plug in use to manage your product listing.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9894930].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author shazbot
    We have used Miva Merchant for a long time now on a separate VPS. We think it is time to move to something else. We like the idea of converting everything over to Wordpress because of the CMS capabilities, and based on the recommendations here. It looks like Wordpress has several cart options, including woocommerce, shopp and cart66. Anyone know what the best/most robust is?

    I also wanted to thank sbucciarel for her invaluable feedback. it was really great that she took the time to counterpoint all of the criticisms for wordpress.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9906813].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author shazbot
    BTW, we've had experience running a store since the late nineties, I am just new to the WF.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9906818].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AadhyaMehra
    Banned
    Magento is really a heavy platform that support developers and creative designers in your mind. Excellent high level of customizability, and you may do great things by using the technical information, including intermediate to superior knowledge of HTML/CSS/PHP. Should you be a newbie, and you simply would like to get your store on the internet, you will probably find yourself dropped. Additionally, it takes additional time and energy to keep your cart.

    Shopify is among the easiest-to-use eCommerce systems available on the market. This system is user-friendly and flexible; you will get your shop ready to go immediately with no trouble. Along with Shopify, it is simple to create a great-looking website which looks excellent throughout devices, is it viewed on the desktop, laptop computer, or smartphone. If you are after a simple solution doesn't have to understand lots of code or place a lot of time in designing your web shop, Shopify is excellent.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9920290].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CreativeWest
    Have just been provided this with fully covered costs including product sourcing, manufacture, warehousing, shipping and marketing https://www.scribd.com/doc/257909339...e-Architecture
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9925903].message }}
  • I just recently setup trials with Shopify, BigCommerce and Volusion.

    Shopify looked really nice but I don't like the fact that my customers would be re-directed to checkout(dot)shopify(dot)com during the checkout process. Seems like abandoned carts galore.

    Right now I'm having a really tough time picking between BigCommerce and Volusion. They both seem really similar.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9927352].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Lipipaliwal
    Banned
    Well, I would like to prefer Magento for my ecommerce website. The reason behind this is, it is versatile and customized ecommerce platform. Apart from this, it is mobile friendly and is easily operated in Smart phones and tablets as well.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9961830].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SaanviRao
    Banned
    I think, Opencart is the best option for any ecommerce website.Because, the themes of its are customizable and user friendly and you can also open it mobile phones as well as tablets.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9974570].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author 720iamthesenate
    WordPress works fine for me. I have a few friends who do well with Shopify, but I guess it all comes down to whatever feels most comfortable for you to work with.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9978293].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Slade556
    Wordpress is great and really flexible, but then again so is Shopify, and opencart is good as well. So, I'm also for the idea that it's all subjective, what feels comfortable is best!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9978388].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author skybridgedomains
    Wordpress is good to get started (if no experience)
    Magento hosted on a dedicated server if you intend on having a large site with lots of products.
    Shopfiy. Is good to have a presence on and link it to your other sites.


    By choice I would use Magento with a Dedicated Server or Fast High Spec Shared Linux hosting.
    Signature
    us
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9982257].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CreativeWest
    There are also these which have recently come online for Magento.

    @Pixafy drag-drop installation Magento certified with 7-10s page loads at $1,000 to $5,000/yr
    @CommerceKick business install non-certified with 1-2s page loads at $1,000 to $5,000 one time
    @Creatuity technical install Magento certified with 3-5s page loads at $4,000 one time

    Reference Re: Magento Small Business Program - Page 2 - Magento Forums
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9982285].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author leokoo
    Let's get the facts straight before we talk about which is the best ecommerce platform. The main issue is - What is your budget?

    Are you a startup on bootstrap? (as in using your own savings?))
    Are you a startup with money or better still, angel investors?
    Are you a developer trying to start something for yourself or your customer?
    Or finally, are you a multinational company with numerous stores and need something to integrate in.

    Then the next questions would be
    1) What is your technical competency? Do you plan to do the maintenance and development yourself or outsource it?
    2) How many features do you actually need?
    3) What is your development budget?
    4) Self Hosted or not?

    You see, there is no simple answer. And no, it's not about which cart can handle more products.

    1) If you're on a tight budget but are technically competent in PHP, Javascript and OOP, your best choice would be
    a) OpenCart
    b) WooCommerce

    This is because OpenCart's extensions are the most affordable out there in the market. WooCommerce comes next. Extensions don't get updated all that frequent on OpenCart though, which is a problem if you need to update regularly.

    Magento & Prestashop's extensions are among the most expensive in the market.

    2) If you are a programming genius and on a absolute budget, then your best choices are
    a) OS Commerce

    Though it comes in an old legacy system which makes it hard to template, add ons are free of charge. And I've seen really large stores on this. However, you might spend quite a fair bit of time on the backend.

    3) If budget isn't a concern and you're not a programmer, then your best choices would be
    a) Hosted
    i) Shopify
    ii) BigCommerce

    Shopify comes as a SAAS, which makes it easy for you to focus on your store. With tons of apps, you can easily add functionality as you wish and need. However, be careful of the recurring costs these apps could add up.

    Unless you are satisfied using the basic Shopify/BigCommerce, having an advance store could cost you hundred of USD every month.

    4) If budget isn't a concern and you don't mind spending yearly on development fees, then go with
    a) Magento

    Though it is highly recommended by developers on this forum, extensions are priced for renewals every 3 months or so. Major updates breaks the site and it becomes frustrating. Full page cache requires you to have a full Magento Enterprise license, which costs USD 20k/year.

    As such, if you run a million dollar store and need a powerful site to link between your physical and online store, going with software like Demandware makes more sense.

    Here's the estimated breakdown of costs, both initial and yearly for each platform
    1) OpenCart
    Cost of Software = 0
    Cost of Extensions = USD 3k
    Yearly Renewals for certain extensions = USD 200/year
    Server Costs = USD 240/year or more, depending on traffic
    Maintenance = Moderately Easy, 7/10
    Cost for developed site = USD 3k to 10k
    Rating of Costs = A

    2) WooCommerce
    Cost of Software = 0
    Costs of Extensions = USD 4k
    Yearly renewals of extensions = USD 2k/year
    Server costs = USD 360/year or more
    Maintenance = Easy, 8/10
    Cost of developed site = USD 8k to 24k,
    Rating of Costs = B+

    3) OS Commerce
    Cost of software = 0
    Cost of extensions = 0
    Yearly renewals of extensions = 0
    Server Costs = USD 240/year or more
    Maintenance = Moderately hard, 4/10
    Cost of developed site = USD 3-5k
    Rating of costs = A

    4) Prestashop
    Cost of Software = 0
    Costs of Extensions = USD 6k
    Yearly renewals of extensions = USD 4k/year
    Server costs = USD 360/year or more
    Maintenance = Moderate, 6/10
    Cost of developed site = USD 10k-20k
    Rating of costs = B-

    5) Shopify
    Cost of Software = USD 350/year or more
    Cost of apps = USD 10.5k/year or more
    Maintenance = Easy, 10/10
    Cost of developed site = USD 10k - 70k
    Rating of costs = C-

    6) Magento Community
    Cost of Software = 0
    Cost of extensions = USD 7k
    Yearly renewals of extensions = USD 5k/year or more
    Server Costs = USD 960/year or more
    Maintenance = Hard, 3/10
    Cost of developed site = USD 25k - 100k
    Rating of Costs = E

    Btw, upgrading major Magento versions (like from 1.8 to 2.0), would likely break your site. As such, you would need to hire developers that charge you about USD 50-150/hour. Expect to spend quite a fair bit on upgrading That's why you see so many "helpful" Magento developers on this thread. It is easy money for them

    p/s: I've seen friends losing their site when they tried upgrading their Magento carts themselves. Talk about a lack of experience and backups
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9985407].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author LaurLaurentiu
    Full disclosure: I work at Bigcommerce. The advantage of a SaaS platform like Bigcommerce is that they handle all the backend, maintenance and security (PCI complaint) complexities for you, so that you the store owner can focus on doing what you do best. Marketing your store, getting new customers and collecting and shipping orders. For instance, Bigcommerce offers free and premium responsive themes, flexible product management, optimized checkout, best-in-class analytics, as well as seamless integrations with dozens of third-party apps.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10035311].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AadhyaMehra
    Banned
    I will choose WordPress because it is very easy to make website with it and also it takes less time than others. A newbie can also easily create website in WordPress.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10036551].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Johnny33
    This is a really nice article from Elegant Themes that breaks down the big differences between WooCommerce and Magento. http://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/re...-right-for-you Ultimately, I would say that Magento is the greater platform, but WooCommerce is nice if you are familiar with WordPress. The key to Magento is a good host that knows what they were doing. Check out their preferred partner's page for some suggestions there. I have experience with Nexcess and they fit all the requirements of a great Magento host. Hosting Partners | Magento Partner Directory
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10074885].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author seewin1111
    zen cart's dashboard is quite nice.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10075388].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author joshyadams
    Definitely a big fan of WordPress and WooCommerce.

    Very simple, not too bulky and a lot of plugins to enhance its functionality.
    Signature

    Head of Marketing at E-Liquid UK Store

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10076582].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Riccur
    Shopify seems like your best choice for right now. It will be easy to integrate everything you currently have. There are also options on Shopify, which makes shipping your products very easy. Once you get more products I would look at switching, but this will be a great starting point.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10077355].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AadhyaMehra
    Banned
    Originally Posted by zannix View Post

    Hey guys,

    If I want to build an ecommerce site that will be selling about 100-200 products for starters, what option am I best off going for?

    I've heard Magento can be pretty heavy unless you have tons of products you're selling. Wordpress sounds tempting since I'm already quite familiar with it...

    And what about Shopify? Any experiences?

    Basically, I'd like to know the difference between these and what each of them is best suited for.

    Thanks a lot!
    Zannix
    You should make your website with Openkart as it is the best platform for making small ecommerce websites. Magento is also good, but it is better for large websites.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10086148].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mamoasele69
    You can absolutely try Shopify for tiny online store (Around 100 - 150 products)... But there is one SEO related drawback of Shopify....
    Means,
    - You can't edit robots.txt file. It will be auto generated.
    - You can not even edit sitemap.xml
    - You will have to also face some problems at the time of domain varifyication (Like on pinterest, some coupon code submission sites.)

    But after all if you have small amount of product and if you want to find some easy way to build it then Shopify is best compare to other platforms.

    Hope it will help.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10136708].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author exlcart
    Opencart is best among all the three platforms. It is developer friendly and easy to customize.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10136770].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author FarNext
    It depends upon your business requirements.
    Would you compare Apples with Oranges?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10158518].message }}

Trending Topics