Low conversion, little traffic, few sales, Help!

30 replies
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I started my online business in Feb. 2014 so far I have only made 4 sales as of today. My conversion is around 1.1-2.7% what is a good way for me to increase it and feedback to better design my website would be great.

Boxers and Briefs For Men, Swimwear, Thermals, and Our Best Selling Sports Undies | Dude Undies
#conversion #low #sales #traffic
  • Profile picture of the author serpyre
    Around 2-2.5% is about average, you can read our comments here http://www.warriorforum.com/ecommerc...c-website.html and here http://www.warriorforum.com/ecommerc...ting-well.html. You are using BigCommere so read this http://www.warriorforum.com/ecommerc...ml#post9369095 - on top of that you are dealing with accessories - harder market than core goods.
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  • Profile picture of the author Solid Commerce
    First of all, I think your site is pretty great. You seem to really understand how you can own your niche, and your site comes across as confident. It looks good, in terms of design.

    Here are a few things I can suggest:

    - Come up with a killer value proposition. This might take some time and development. But if you can develop something along the lines of what Dollar Shave Does? Something beyond simply "we have a ton of unides for dudes," would really help to set you apart from the competition.

    - I say this all the time, but...blog. ESPECIALLY YOU.

    Your site is already primed to be kind of funny and irreverent. I mean, think about it! You sell undies. Your site is called dudeundies.com -- it's perfect.

    Your site is so ripe for a blog, it's not even funny. And what's more is that your site is one that I would totally expect to have a clever, hilarious, attention-getting blog. Seriously, I can't stress enough how much a great content marketing campaign would help you out.

    The audience that you're trying to reach -- the younger audience, I'm imagining -- is exactly the type of audience that responds to content marketing. Get out there on your social channels and rep your brand in innovative, exciting ways.

    Look at brands like Eat 24 -- recently, a friend of mine asked me, puzzled, why she was sitting around, reading the blog of a food delivery website. The answer? It was fun, hilarious, and engaging...even when she wasn't considering ordering food.

    That kind of content campaign will not only get you noticed and boost your position within your niche, but also makes Google VERY happy, which is great news for your website's SEO situation.

    Hope this helps!
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    _ Sean B.
    Solid Commerce

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    • Profile picture of the author truitt661
      Hi Sean,

      Thank you for the help I will take some notes from this and use it. I think this would be a great way to get myself going. I have checked out Eat24 and there blog is not all that but they are getting people to share there content.

      Originally Posted by Solid Commerce View Post

      First of all, I think your site is pretty great. You seem to really understand how you can own your niche, and your site comes across as confident. It looks good, in terms of design.

      Here are a few things I can suggest:

      - Come up with a killer value proposition. This might take some time and development. But if you can develop something along the lines of what Dollar Shave Does? Something beyond simply "we have a ton of unides for dudes," would really help to set you apart from the competition.

      - I say this all the time, but...blog. ESPECIALLY YOU.

      Your site is already primed to be kind of funny and irreverent. I mean, think about it! You sell undies. Your site is called dudeundies.com -- it's perfect.

      Your site is so ripe for a blog, it's not even funny. And what's more is that your site is one that I would totally expect to have a clever, hilarious, attention-getting blog. Seriously, I can't stress enough how much a great content marketing campaign would help you out.

      The audience that you're trying to reach -- the younger audience, I'm imagining -- is exactly the type of audience that responds to content marketing. Get out there on your social channels and rep your brand in innovative, exciting ways.

      Look at brands like Eat 24 -- recently, a friend of mine asked me, puzzled, why she was sitting around, reading the blog of a food delivery website. The answer? It was fun, hilarious, and engaging...even when she wasn't considering ordering food.

      That kind of content campaign will not only get you noticed and boost your position within your niche, but also makes Google VERY happy, which is great news for your website's SEO situation.

      Hope this helps!
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      • Profile picture of the author wmrwl
        Your conversion rates seem healthy enough, but you need more traffic (as stated above).

        Look at where your competitors are and reverse engineer their marketing strategies. Do what they're doing and be where they are.
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  • Profile picture of the author kjamesnv
    2% conversion isn't horrible and its definitely a good starting point.

    However if you are converting @ 2% and have 4 sales that means you have had only 200 visitors in 5 months. Your traffic is WAY too low... like 1 visitor a day. You will never make any money unless you get significantly more traffic.

    My suggestion is to get REALLY REALLY good at 1 traffic source- maybe PPC or Social. Work hard at it and learn all the tricks and techniques- read everything you can. Once you have that then you can expand into other areas like email and affiliate marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Larmore Smith
    First, congratulations for getting your online store up & running. Kjamesnic is giving you valuable information. Try advertising Facebook. You can also make a few of those campaigns with some funny quotes or funny designs, etc. on the undies. Also try Adwords, make sure to start small to see how it goes. Target keywords that are relevant to what you are selling and use negative keywords as well. I will also like to add to do a couple of press releases.

    As far as the design goes - the Logo is cool but it doesn't stand out as much. You may want to have your toll free number bigger and a different font - you may want to consider placing the toll free number in a different area on the header. You should consider adding a banner to your header maybe advertising a sale or discount for the products on your website.

    The footer - you may want to make the image of Paypal smaller and align - add a SSL certificate next to it perhaps.

    However, overall a great job. Time to market the hell of of it.

    All the best
    Larmore Smith
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  • Profile picture of the author truitt661
    thank you all for the feedback. I have been very busy today to reply to you all, but I will take ever not into consideration.

    Thank you again.
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  • Profile picture of the author serpyre
    PPC doesn't work anymore for SMES Google AdWords - Bing is least worst compared to Google, but it doesn't have the traffic. We can confirm the link as some consultants we know ran some tests, exactly the same conclusion. It will always come back to the movement towards the 'fat tails'. Press release don't hold much sway unless you get them in to mass media, basically the $100s releases on the top sites - the PRLog style are helpful but don't really generate much traffic - more for just getting your name known. Still, as we said before, accessories is a tough market, online clothing is concentrated in to one area with 70% of the overall sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author James Gordon
      Customers play an important role for all types of business. Offer some discounts or reward points to increase your business sales. It is one of the simplest and best way for getting more conversion.
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    • Profile picture of the author dburk
      Originally Posted by serpyre View Post

      PPC doesn't work anymore for SMES Google AdWords - Bing is least worst compared to Google, but it doesn't have the traffic. We can confirm the link as some consultants we know ran some tests, exactly the same conclusion. It will always come back to the movement towards the 'fat tails'. Press release don't hold much sway unless you get them in to mass media, basically the $100s releases on the top sites - the PRLog style are helpful but don't really generate much traffic - more for just getting your name known. Still, as we said before, accessories is a tough market, online clothing is concentrated in to one area with 70% of the overall sales.
      Hi serpyre,

      That article is just one man's perspective, and in my opinion, only partially true.

      Yes, competition in AdWords has indeed increased. So it is no longer as easy for a small firm, with small resources, to compete as it was in the past. However, just because it isn't as easy, does not mean it is impossible. What it takes is a superior strategy and lots of CRO, testing and adapting. You can not hope to compete in the most lucrative niches without having a superior marketing strategy and mastery of marketing tactics.

      It is possible for a small web store to hire an agency with all the talent needed to compete. Perhaps not a web store that is just a hobby, but any that is big enough to have a couple of employees, can benefit from hiring a professional ad agency to manage campaigns.

      What the article did not point out is, while it is difficult to compete in the broad niches, narrow niches are still easier to compete in, and the OP's store is focus on a narrow niche, which is ideal for Adwords, and other PPC channels. Again, just how easy is always determined by the level of competition within the narrow niche.

      In the past, one was able to run sloppy campaigns and survive on the crumbs left behind via lower positioned ads. Nowadays you may find the competition for the crumbs is so high that it is less profitable than the crème de la crème (the top ad positions).

      To make it even tougher there has been a trend among users of search engines to trust the top ads far more that the lower positioned ads. So these days you might see as much as 90% of the conversions going exclusively to the top ad position. So, even though the competition is high for the top ad, the number of conversions from that ad position make it worthwhile targeting and optimizing for the top ad position.

      I have seen a lot of small players ran out of markets simply because they did not grasp this high converting top ad trend and never even considered competing for the top ads. They just looked at the high CPC and ran away with their tail between their legs. If they had the guts to test the top ads they would have found that they were more profitable than the lower ad positions by a large margin.

      If first noticed this trend years ago in certain very high competition financial niches, and gradually it has grown to be common in many ecommerce niches, especially during the past 12 months.
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      • Profile picture of the author dburk
        Hi truitt661,

        The site design is not bad, however consider switching to a Responsive Web Design theme to provide a better experience for all users, especially those on mobile devices.

        You mention the free shipping for orders over $100 on the homepage, but do not mention it any place else. This is one of your value propositions and you should drill it into the audience's brains by mentioning it at every opportunity, especially on the product page and in the cart.

        The website seemed extremely sluggish, that is a serious conversion killer. So, I checked it on Pingdom tools and found your website is slower than 90% of all tested websites. Try to do some optimization, though I'm not sure how much you can do since it is on a hosted shopping cart service.
        https://support.bigcommerce.com/ques...the+problem%3F

        Another way to boost conversions is to develop a marketing plan based on market segmentation and targeting ad campaigns specifically tailored for each segment.
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  • Profile picture of the author serpyre
    Unfortunately you are incorrect but that would make sense. The article is one perspective, but as we have already said (you must have missed it) some multi-national consultants who work on architectures costing $100s thousands to $millions to rank against companies such as Net-A-Porter, Amazon and Saks also proved it to be the case. As is the situation these days, everyone quotes the 'exception to prove the rule', unfortunately for 95% they are not the exception, they are the majority. It would be fantastic if everyone were in the top 5% or top 1%, but that is not the case.

    On one side you have the enterprise companies, on the other the very targeted niche, it is everything in-between that is being squeezed and will progressively increase. Of course there will be winners, but there will be many more losers - for the majority PPC is now worthless and they need to find alternatives to rank. It comes down to a shift from Business SEO to Technical SEO at the highest levels (Google, multi-nationals started in 2010/11) - but we won't bore you with the details.
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  • Profile picture of the author hantoren
    The conversion rate is decent in my opinion, but you should try out an exit-intent popup service like Bounce Exchange or OptiMonk (free beta). Conversion increasement using exit-intent technology is proven.

    It might help you to get into PPC or other paid traffic sources as well, if you increase your conversion, you increase your ROI.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Matthew
    To increase the traffic of your website, you may use social media sites. Today millions of people visit the social sites. If you advertise or post any articles and images about your product or website you can easily reach many customers.
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    • Profile picture of the author peekay
      3 Quick Suggestions
      • Communicate more - there is very little information on your home page at the moment, tell your story, like saddlebackleather.com/the-story
      • Make your search box bigger and more prominent
      • Offer a bribe to collect email addresses (you will make a killing with email)
      See more suggestions here - slideshare.net/PKBibi/9-tips-to-grow-e-commerce-revenues-in-2014
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      Find out free how CRO can double or triple your conversions, sales & profits in the next 60 to 90 days...
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      • Profile picture of the author John Matthew
        Thanks for your useful suggestions.
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  • Profile picture of the author i2giftshop
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author LABEShops
      "Type a description for this product here..."

      I saw this on several of your products. You really need to take the time to write some good product descriptions, including keywords.
      Signature

      Owner of LABEShops.com & 20+ Niche Online Stores as well as Scifispace.com and other sites. Recommended Host: Evolve

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      • Profile picture of the author John Matthew
        Keywords helps to increase the visibility of the website and traffic. This leads to more conversions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Linnworks
    I think your site has a nice theme but there is very little content, it looks - not completed.

    I saw some one mentioned a blog, good idea, I think you need some more content on your site, think of keywords - longtail ones as well (Long search terms/key words that may be less competitive and more specific)

    What have you done in the way of Marketing?

    All the best,

    Charlie McBroom
    Linnworks
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Your site would be raking in the cash with an adequate PPC budget. Don't worry about turning a profit ... get the CUSTOMER. Nobody owns one pair of underwear and new styles come out all the time. Get the customer and re-engage them later. Forget about SEO, use PPC to drive relevant traffic. Get the email via opt ins, giveaways, price comparisons, etc. Even if you will lose a couple bucks on a sale, the value is in owning the custome and you will sell them another product later.
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    • Profile picture of the author truitt661
      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      Your site would be raking in the cash with an adequate PPC budget. Don't worry about turning a profit ... get the CUSTOMER. Nobody owns one pair of underwear and new styles come out all the time. Get the customer and re-engage them later. Forget about SEO, use PPC to drive relevant traffic. Get the email via opt ins, giveaways, price comparisons, etc. Even if you will lose a couple bucks on a sale, the value is in owning the custome and you will sell them another product later.
      I will have to read more about PPC. I heard that it really cost but hopefully it can pay off.
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      • Profile picture of the author ronrule
        Originally Posted by truitt661 View Post

        I will have to read more about PPC. I heard that it really cost but hopefully it can pay off.
        What's the cost of not getting any sales?

        Look at it this way ... you've had a site up for 7 months and have no sales. Add that 7 months to however long it took you to source the products and build the site, and that's how far in you are with no return on your investment.

        At this point you don't really know how well your site converts, because you don't have enough traffic to give you a "real" conversion rate. It may calculate out at some percentage, but you don't have enough data to know if that means anything... if I send 10 people to a site and two of them buy, does that make my site conversion rate 20%? Sure, within that sample, but that 20% won't hold once I send thousands of visitors there.

        So don't mess with your site yet... your categories could be improved. Men who are searching the Internet for underwear are brand conscious, so there should be an easy way to navigate by brand on the site. But other than that, you really don't know what's working and what isn't, you need more data before you make decisions. What you need is buyer traffic, and that comes from focused keyword-based searches. People who are searching for exactly what you're selling. The only way to get those, without wasting even MORE time on SEO, is PPC.

        AdWords = instant gratification. You commit to a budget, even if that's only $1,000 that's fine, whatever you have. But you WILL get traffic, and you WILL get sales. You may not make enough to cover the cost of the campaign, but you'll get the data you need.

        Let's say you end up upside down; you spend $1,000 on clicks, but you only get $700 worth of sales. Is that a loss? Not necessarily... here's why:

        1. When you analyze the results, you'll see what keywords brought you buyers and what keywords didn't do jack squat. Run it again next month and spend more on the keywords that delivered, drop the ones that didn't. You need this data, and it's worth the cost. I've run campaigns before and discovered that two of the keywords I thought would bring in the most sales actually delivered a ton of junk traffic and no buyers - simply removing them made the rest of the campaign profitable the following month.

        2. With a proper re-engagement campaign in place (even if it's just a weekly email), some percentage of those initial buyers will return and buy something else. Maybe next week, maybe in 3 months. Give them incentive to ... it's a hell of a lot easier (and cheaper) to sell a second product to an existing customer than to get a new customer.

        3. You'll have enough traffic that your analytics will actually MEAN something. You'll see where they're landing and where you're losing them. You can fine-tune your pages and, over time, improve your conversion rates.

        Remember that a 1% conversion bump is a big deal - on a site that converts at 1%, getting to 2% is a 100% increase in orders. That's twice as many sales for the same marketing dollar spent, so it matters. Getting one of my sites from 2.36% to 3.1% this year has resulted in an extra $500k in revenue so far, and the year is far from over.

        Here's the thing, even if your margins are too thin to ever support a PPC campaign as a long-term strategy, it's still profitable in the sense of getting the data you need. There are probably a dozen or so keywords that would rake in the cash for your site all day long... but what are they? You don't know. So you can spend another 7 months optimizing your site for the words you think might convert, or you can KNOW what words will convert by dropping a few bucks and testing them. If a word is a dud, lesson learned - you know not to waste time optimizing for that word. But if a word turns into sales, now you know what word to focus your SEO efforts on, so eventually you can rank on those words organically.

        A couple of tips when you set up your PPC campaign... NEVER send a visitor to your home page on anything but a generic term. A generic term would be "mens underwear" or "mens boxers".

        If a person is searching for "manview boxers", don't send them to the homepage, send them to a page of Manview products.

        If they're searching for "clever mayorca" send them RIGHT to the page for that product, not your homepage, not a category.

        It's not that hard when you think it through... remove yourself and think like your customer. If you were searching for any of these phrases, where would you want to land? Some homepage where you have to browse through categories to find what you want? Or do you want to land right where you need to be, so you can BUY the item you were looking for and check out?

        Product searches are from people who want to spend money. For your site, I would have a separate ad group for every individual product, and landing pages for every brand. Take the time to set it up, spend whatever you can spare, and then roll your revenue into the next month's spend. Put nothing in your pocket. You could do $25k per week with this site easy if you ramp up to it properly.
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        • Profile picture of the author ronrule
          Originally Posted by serpyre View Post

          It is seriously frightening how people give advice and do not even do the maths of it.

          $100 per day PPC at $0.50 per click (low) is 200 clicks per day (visitors), at 2.5% conversion rate(unlikely) is 5 orders per day at $127 average per order (Amazon) is $635 revenue with 30% net profit margin is $190 - gross profit margin after costs anywhere from 5-20% of revenue - each order costs $20 in ppc.

          So unless you have a very high conversion rate or incredibly high margins - you will be working for free with all the risk - just how service providers like it. As we said - stupid advice.

          The question to the op is, do you want the correct advice how to do it or the advice that lines the service providers pockets at the expense of your time, money and sanity.


          Nothing could more perfectly illustrate "small thinking" than your post. I don't know which is worse, the fact that you insist in a condescending tone that PPC is "bad advice", or the fact that you think your suggestion was good.

          A couple of problems with your counter point;

          1. You don't have to "outbid" your competitors. In fact, trying to do so is how most people lose money with PPC. They see the current max bid is 50 cents and think they need to beat it... they don't. You can bid 25 cents. You don't have to be the top bidder, you bid what you're willing to pay. Your ad will be shown less than the top bidder, but so what? It's still being shown, and you're only paying when someone clicks on it. Also, a side note, with roughly a $100K per month in PPC spending across a couple dozen products, I have NEVER had the top ad perform as well as being 4th or 7th. Never. I get more CLICKS in #1, but more SALES in #4, for less money spent. In your example, your cost to get 200 visitors would have been $100 @ 50 cents. In my example, that same $100 would have brought 400 visitors - and those 400 visitors would convert at a higher rate than your 200.

          2. The sales funnel value trumps the product price. My typical $20 product ends up being a $57 average order value. If I calculated my ROI based on COG's on a $20 order the math wouldn't work. It works fine when calculated on the AOV. It doesn't matter if an individual sale ends up being a loss as long as the overall CAMPAIGN is profitable.

          3. Every customer has a value beyond their initial order. For me, roughly 30% make a second purchase later and 60% of those are multiple repeat buyers. It costs nothing to get that second and subsequent sales. Even if you haven't figured out how to maximize it, the point is you're building a buyer list of people who are confirmed to like what you're selling and trust you as a seller. That alone has significant value. I have a buyer list of more than two million customers... some of them I never turned a profit on until their second or third purchase. I wouldn't have made ANYTHING if I didn't have them on the list to begin with.

          Like I said, PPC won't be profitable for everyone. But to look at your obvious lack of experience with it as the benchmark of whether someone should do PPC or not is the real "bad advice" - especially when you know nothing about their market or their products. At a minimum, PPC will give him the data on where he should be focusing his marketing efforts and enough traffic to determine what site improvements could increase conversions. It beats the "waiting around to see what happens" strategy every time.
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          Ron Rule
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  • Profile picture of the author SmallRevolution
    Hey truitt661,

    Wow! Quite the eye candy in your store!

    You've obviously made an enormous effort with the product photos, but I wonder why you haven't put more time into your About page.

    Check your Google Analytics and see how many people are visiting it. Ideally it will be one of the top visited pages, and yet it doesn't really 'sell' your story or your product.

    This has been mentioned by others but you really need to add in a lot more content. A good About Us page will be a good start.

    I've temporarily opened up the how-to guide that we have on this topic, but will close it down again shortly.

    How To Write About Us Page That Makes Your Store Shine - Small Revolution

    Let me know if it helps,
    Katrina
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    Founder of SmallRevolution.com
    Build your own online store, step by step.

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    • Profile picture of the author truitt661
      Originally Posted by SmallRevolution View Post

      Hey truitt661,

      Wow! Quite the eye candy in your store!

      You've obviously made an enormous effort with the product photos, but I wonder why you haven't put more time into your About page.

      Check your Google Analytics and see how many people are visiting it. Ideally it will be one of the top visited pages, and yet it doesn't really 'sell' your story or your product.

      This has been mentioned by others but you really need to add in a lot more content. A good About Us page will be a good start.

      I've temporarily opened up the how-to guide that we have on this topic, but will close it down again shortly.

      How To Write About Us Page That Makes Your Store Shine - Small Revolution

      Let me know if it helps,
      Katrina
      Hi Katrina,

      Thank you for your feedback. The "About Us" page have been mention but I really haven't had the time to put more work into it. I will get to it around the end of the week and than you for the link. I will read over it tonight.
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  • Profile picture of the author trustedmarketer
    Have you tried facebook ads. I concentrate on improving my CTR which then leads to better conversions. Changing the image and text is a great way of split testing. Get targeted traffic and you will do better.
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Originally Posted by serpyre View Post

    Great, more people using extended verbage to try and dilute reality - small mindset - that's seriously funny. Regardless of the fact that it comes from multi-national consultants with chargeouts of $1,000s per day and even they avoid ppc where possible - well probably because they can generate 25-30 visitors per $1 (even for SMEs) rather than ppcs 1-2 per $1 - that's $0.03-$0.04 per click or $1.2-$1.6/order.

    The figures are very simple, anything more than 20% for ppc and you might as well just send cash to Google directly and skip the time wasting - it's still stupid advice to rely on ppc no matter which way you cut it.
    I think you need to read your source material a little more closely, you'll have a hard time finding any legitimate "multi-national consultant" who would advise a company not to spend any money on PPC. Every single consultant worth their pay would tell the client to double down and focus on the funnel.

    And yeah, it is small thinking you're displaying. You're basing your calculation on the ROI of an individual product, not the ROI of the order or customer.

    If I only have product, which sells for $20 and I net $2 of that sale, then yeah, I would have to convert at 13% to break even even at 25 cents per click. But if my AOV is $60 due to higher-margin upsells, I can convert at 2% and still see a 176% ROI.

    You know the infomercials you see on TV? You probably wonder how they could possibly be making any money spending that much on advertising for a $20 product... That's how - the upsells bring the AOV up to 3 times the advertised price. Smart eCommerce vendors do the exact same thing. In THIS case, the OP doesn't have enough data to know what his AOV's will be. PPC will get him those answers. It's OK if you aren't profitable on day one or month one. The point is to get the data and treat it like a real business, not a one-off sale. That's what successful companies do.

    I don't know who's material you've been reading to come to these conclusions of yours, but you should stop.
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    Ron Rule
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Originally Posted by serpyre View Post

    Some consultants who work for companies like L'Oreal & Samsonite on -million projects. For reference it is not ourselves hijacking the discussion with overly long passages to drown out information.

    The lifetime values has the grand use of zip if the company is out of business. You are thinking linear progression, however you need to get past the first years as a startup - it is using hindsight bias to project what you have learnt - startups do not have such luxuries- however you are heavily discounting facts. Such as the cost of time for keyword research, fake competitor clicks, among others. PPC will provide a 20% insight, that's it, primarily because that is the maximum the PPC sales channel generates.

    So you are generating 5-6 clicks per $1, take account of your time than is likely 2-3 per $1. Now, we implemented a new clean Magento CE site (using best practice) over a couple of weeks, $3,000 with 5,000 products. Put the company on a specialist hosting environment and they are generating 9,000 visistors per month organically - no marketing - no ppc - no social media. The hosting is generating ~24 visitors per $1 of spend - corporate levels but then these are SAP consultants who designed the architecture.

    So, except for branding and niche long tail low competition keywords, PPC generates traffic but the net end effect is single digit visitors per $1 and that is without taking account of time costs. So, in most circumstances ppc as a primary source or trafiic is the quick way to losing money - multiple times worse for startups.

    Unfortunately we have learnt the hard way that you cannot rationalise with the irrational - of which ppc is irrational in all but 'fat tail' exceptions.

    So then the question becomes - who has the small mindset!
    So... consultants like me?

    Everything you're saying is the exact opposite of reality, man. You talk about going out of business, but don't want to spend money on advertising. You talk about "getting past the first years as a startup" but don't want to build an audience. You equate PPC sales to a 20% model, even though anyone who knows how to properly manage a PPC campaign will yield 100-400% ROI. You consider $3,000 over a couple of weeks with a 5,000 product site successful... you'd be doing $15,000 per DAY with that many products following my model.

    I don't normally call people out like this, but dude, you have no freaking idea what you're talking about. Nothing you've said, in this or any other thread, makes any sense. Your condescending attitude further makes the point that you're insecure with your answers, and seek to mimic expert credibility when you have none. Here's a dose of reality for you... You had a bad experience with PPC because you didn't know what you were doing, and you found a couple articles from other people who didn't know what they were doing so you would feel vindicated. You're in no position to be giving advice.

    Either that, or you sell Magento implementations and SEO services - in which case, your answers totally make sense, because in order to sell those products you would see a benefit in diminishing the value of every other solution on the market.
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    Ron Rule
    http://ronrule.com

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  • I wouldn't underestimate the reach of social media! You got some good advice to consider a blog. You can use witty, funny, satirical content to create a draw for a community and then sift out your customers from your fans.

    Facebook and Instagram can be very resourceful for an online store. Your website seems to lend itself to a younger, more 'hip' crowd and would benefit from promoting this aspect of your brand and the lifestyle that your product compliments. Running some sharp, sexy and engaging campaigns through your social media that link back to your website can be a great start.
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