What is the average Open Rate and Click Rate for Email Marketing these days?

by FreedomBlogger 9 replies
Hi awesome Warriors!

I have a quick question for you all here ....

What is the average open rate and click through rate for email marketing these days?

A while ago, I read in a few places that a 10% to 15% is alright for both (open and click rates). But is this low? ...or is it about right?

Maybe I got some wrong info here lol

Of course, I understand that it will depend on the size of your list. But, I am talking about "in general" here.

I would love to hear some feedback from the veteran internet marketers here.

I would really appreciate it.

Thank you!!
#email marketing #average #average open rate #click #click rate #days #email #email marketing #internet marketing #marketing #open #open rate #rate
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  • Profile picture of the author chyan007
    Banned
    Originally Posted by FreedomBlogger View Post

    Hi awesome Warriors!

    I have a quick question for you all here ....

    What is the average open rate and click through rate for email marketing these days?

    A while ago, I read in a few places that a 10% to 15% is alright for both (open and click rates). But is this low? ...or is it about right?

    Maybe I got some wrong info here lol

    Of course, I understand that it will depend on the size of your list. But, I am talking about "in general" here.

    I would love to hear some feedback from the veteran internet marketers here.

    I would really appreciate it.

    Thank you!!
    Hi ,

    According to me ,Open Rate of close to 20 percent and CTR of 10 perc (Which Btw is pretty difficult to get) these days,Those numbers are pretty good ...To be honest pretty difficult to attain ,

    Also as you said it depends on the list size as well as the product that you are promoting

    Whether it is appealing ...

    Chyan007
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    • Profile picture of the author FreedomBlogger
      Originally Posted by chyan007 View Post

      Hi ,

      According to me ,Open Rate of close to 20 percent and CTR of 10 perc (Which Btw is pretty difficult to get) these days,Those numbers are pretty good ...To be honest pretty difficult to attain ,

      Also as you said it depends on the list size as well as the product that you are promoting

      Whether it is appealing ...

      Chyan007
      I see!

      So the numbers I mentioned are alright, and normal. Right!

      Thank you very much for your input here!
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    • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
      First... understand that this isn't meant to be critical of anyone. You just gave me an opening to try to say something that I've wanted to say for a long time.

      I'm not trying to start a debate, as I understand that many will disagree with my own views - and those views will probably even butt right up against the views expressed in one or more products you have paid good money for (or promoted to your followers, as an affiliate... or even as a product creator) - but...

      Originally Posted by FreedomBlogger View Post

      What is the average open rate and click through rate for email marketing these days?
      does it really matter?

      What is the purpose of a statistic like "average open rate", or "average click thru rate"? Do you (collectively) need a number like this so that you, too, can strive to be mediocre (average)?

      Understand that any "average" you might see will probably include the stats of gurus, gooroos, vendors promoting their own products, super affiliates, moderately successful affiliates, and/or total newbies.

      We have no idea what percentage of each type.

      "Average" of what?

      We don't know how many relationship marketers are included in those stats, or how many paid advertisers, how many email marketers, or how many desperate spammers, so we can't even make an informed guess at how we should be performing against any such yardstick as "average"

      A while ago, I read in a few places that a 10% to 15% is alright for both (open and click rates). But is this low? ...or is it about right?
      or... does it really matter?

      Originally Posted by chyan007 View Post

      According to me ,Open Rate of close to 20 percent and CTR of 10 perc (Which Btw is pretty difficult to get) these days,Those numbers are pretty good ...To be honest pretty difficult to attain
      _________________________________

      I don't care what you may have read, I doubt the author had in his/her possession the raw data to even calculate those stats.

      Even if they did, these "averages" are of no value without some knowledge of the detail behind those stats.

      Chyan's numbers are relevant to him, as he can measure those, and use them to guage his own performance... against his own past efforts.

      Everyone can do the same. Stats are good... as long as they are YOUR stats. They give you a way to measure how a specific ad campaign is performing, or how your own sales page is converting, or how good your traffic source may be.

      But...
      Once you aggregate the results of multiple email marketers (i.e total mails sent vs. total opens, or total opens vs. total click-thrus), with no detailed knowledge of whose results are included, how they developed their lists, how they nurture their lists, how many times (and how often) they mail to promote the same offer, what they used for a subject line, what their pre-sales message consisted of, how often they mail in general, etc. then all you are "measuring" is mediocrity!!!

      Instead, track and record as much information as possible about your own promotions, so that you can recognize the impact of any change you make in your promotional strategies. Measure every campaign. Learn (over time) what type of offer resonates most with your own list, and adjust your methods to improve your own stats.

      No one else's stats will put money in your pocket, nor change your effectiveness as a marketer.

      Gauging your own performance against anyone else's stats (even an average) is, for the most part, a waste of time. An exercise in futility.

      Instead, track your own numbers. Measure everything you can about your own efforts, and consciously strive to improve your efforts every time you send out a new promotion. Then measure YOUR success or failure against your own prior track record.

      Do not measure yourself against mediocrity!
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      • Profile picture of the author FreedomBlogger
        Originally Posted by Sid Hale View Post

        First... understand that this isn't meant to be critical of anyone. You just gave me an opening to try to say something that I've wanted to say for a long time.

        I'm not trying to start a debate, as I understand that many will disagree with my own views - and those views will probably even butt right up against the views expressed in one or more products you have paid good money for (or promoted to your followers, as an affiliate... or even as a product creator) - but...



        does it really matter?

        What is the purpose of a statistic like "average open rate", or "average click thru rate"? Do you (collectively) need a number like this so that you, too, can strive to be mediocre (average)?

        Understand that any "average" you might see will probably include the stats of gurus, gooroos, vendors promoting their own products, super affiliates, moderately successful affiliates, and/or total newbies.

        We have no idea what percentage of each type.

        "Average" of what?

        We don't know how many relationship marketers are included in those stats, or how many paid advertisers, how many email marketers, or how many desperate spammers, so we can't even make an informed guess at how we should be performing against any such yardstick as "average"



        or... does it really matter?



        _________________________________

        I don't care what you may have read, I doubt the author had in his/her possession the raw data to even calculate those stats.

        Even if they did, these "averages" are of no value without some knowledge of the detail behind those stats.

        Chyan's numbers are relevant to him, as he can measure those, and use them to guage his own performance... against his own past efforts.

        Everyone can do the same. Stats are good... as long as they are YOUR stats. They give you a way to measure how a specific ad campaign is performing, or how your own sales page is converting, or how good your traffic source may be.

        But...
        Once you aggregate the results of multiple email marketers (i.e total mails sent vs. total opens, or total opens vs. total click-thrus), with no detailed knowledge of whose results are included, how they developed their lists, how they nurture their lists, how many times (and how often) they mail to promote the same offer, what they used for a subject line, what their pre-sales message consisted of, how often they mail in general, etc. then all you are "measuring" is mediocrity!!!

        Instead, track and record as much information as possible about your own promotions, so that you can recognize the impact of any change you make in your promotional strategies. Measure every campaign. Learn (over time) what type of offer resonates most with your own list, and adjust your methods to improve your own stats.

        No one else's stats will put money in your pocket, nor change your effectiveness as a marketer.

        Gauging your own performance against anyone else's stats (even an average) is, for the most part, a waste of time. An exercise in futility.

        Instead, track your own numbers. Measure everything you can about your own efforts, and consciously strive to improve your efforts every time you send out a new promotion. Then measure YOUR success or failure against your own prior track record.

        Do not measure yourself against mediocrity!
        Wow! ... what an honest reply man!

        I really do appreciate it!

        I see your point. And yeah, I do agree with you. I was just wondering to see what others are experiencing.

        But yeah, great points you have shared here. Thank you very much for the best reply here!

        It helps a lot!

        Keep on delivering such value and honesty around

        Have a great weekend!!
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        60 Ways to Generate Leads >> Click Here <<
        No excuses to ..."why you can't generate leads" ... after reading this!

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      • Profile picture of the author chyan007
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Sid Hale View Post

        First... understand that this isn't meant to be critical of anyone. You just gave me an opening to try to say something that I've wanted to say for a long time.

        I'm not trying to start a debate, as I understand that many will disagree with my own views - and those views will probably even butt right up against the views expressed in one or more products you have paid good money for (or promoted to your followers, as an affiliate... or even as a product creator) - but...



        does it really matter?

        What is the purpose of a statistic like "average open rate", or "average click thru rate"? Do you (collectively) need a number like this so that you, too, can strive to be mediocre (average)?

        Understand that any "average" you might see will probably include the stats of gurus, gooroos, vendors promoting their own products, super affiliates, moderately successful affiliates, and/or total newbies.

        We have no idea what percentage of each type.

        "Average" of what?

        We don't know how many relationship marketers are included in those stats, or how many paid advertisers, how many email marketers, or how many desperate spammers, so we can't even make an informed guess at how we should be performing against any such yardstick as "average"



        or... does it really matter?



        _________________________________

        I don't care what you may have read, I doubt the author had in his/her possession the raw data to even calculate those stats.

        Even if they did, these "averages" are of no value without some knowledge of the detail behind those stats.

        Chyan's numbers are relevant to him, as he can measure those, and use them to guage his own performance... against his own past efforts.

        Everyone can do the same. Stats are good... as long as they are YOUR stats. They give you a way to measure how a specific ad campaign is performing, or how your own sales page is converting, or how good your traffic source may be.

        But...
        Once you aggregate the results of multiple email marketers (i.e total mails sent vs. total opens, or total opens vs. total click-thrus), with no detailed knowledge of whose results are included, how they developed their lists, how they nurture their lists, how many times (and how often) they mail to promote the same offer, what they used for a subject line, what their pre-sales message consisted of, how often they mail in general, etc. then all you are "measuring" is mediocrity!!!

        Instead, track and record as much information as possible about your own promotions, so that you can recognize the impact of any change you make in your promotional strategies. Measure every campaign. Learn (over time) what type of offer resonates most with your own list, and adjust your methods to improve your own stats.

        No one else's stats will put money in your pocket, nor change your effectiveness as a marketer.

        Gauging your own performance against anyone else's stats (even an average) is, for the most part, a waste of time. An exercise in futility.

        Instead, track your own numbers. Measure everything you can about your own efforts, and consciously strive to improve your efforts every time you send out a new promotion. Then measure YOUR success or failure against your own prior track record.

        Do not measure yourself against mediocrity!
        Thanks Sid for your comment ,Its been a pleasure you stopped by

        Have a great weekend
        Chyanit
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  • Usually between 10 - 20% is standard for the internet marketing niche.

    I believe Mailchimp had a case study on niche-specific open and click rates. Google it
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  • Profile picture of the author rachjob
    Usually between 10 - 20% is standard for the internet marketing niche.

    I believe Mailchimp had a case study on niche-specific open and click rates. Google it
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by FreedomBlogger View Post

    What is the average open rate and click through rate for email marketing these days?
    A while ago, I read in a few places that a 10% to 15% is alright for both (open and click rates). But is this low? ...or is it about right?
    As Sid says, don't concern yourself with average numbers when they're so generalized, they couldn't possibly tell you anything useful about your own performance.

    Instead, ask yourself if you'd be satisfied that only around 1 in 6 of the people who signed up to your list could actually be bothered to open your email.

    .
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    • Profile picture of the author chyan007
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      As Sid says, don't concern yourself with average numbers when they're so generalized, they couldn't possibly tell you anything useful about your own performance.

      Instead, ask yourself if you'd be satisfied that only around 1 in 6 of the people who signed up to your list could actually be bothered to open your email.

      .
      Thank you so much Frank ,for your input

      Cheers
      Chyanit
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