Mistakes I've made when creating mobile friendly emails.

2 replies
Email marketing is the way forward right now and while it might not bring the best results for everyone, it's definitely high on my list of priorities for my marketing.

There is one area that I hadn't been focussing on though and that's making the emails mobile friendly.

The program I use gives you a mobile friendly preview which I thought was enough, but I read somewhere in the past couple of months that most of the population check their emails on a mobile device these days, so with that I realised it was something I'd need to put some extra attention into.

Websites do look totally different on a small screen compared to a laptop so I've focussed on some specific areas in my emails of late to make them mobile friendly, and I thought I'd pass on what I've been doing as it seems to be working.

1) Swap paragraphs for bullet points.
This is a big one. I like my emails to tell a story and create relationship with the reader which is all well and good on a big screen. The downside to this though is that is someone's reading it on a mobile, that point is likely or be lost and just look like a great big chunk of text which, if someone's in a rush, who's going to read it??

2) Decrease the size of images.
I'd never even considered this so while I'm searching for the best stock images around, the size of them was actually slowing down loading times on a mobile view. This meant that people are clicking, waiting and then getting distracted so not even reading the content.

I stull use the same images but just resize them in a picture editor program to make sure it doesn't halt the loading time.

3) Highlight CTA
Again, I liked to be a bit more subtle with my CTA by hiding them in my content., however I don't think this is a good thing to do for any emails, regardless of whether they're mobile friendly (you live and learn!) For mobile emails though I've made sure that I have three prominent CTA buttons (BUY NOW mostly) so that id someone is scanning on their phone then they know exactly how they can give me their money without having to delve into, or even read, the bulk of the copy.

4) Shrink headlines.
Again, I thought the longer the better but it turned out that most of my readers were only getting to see the first dew word of my witty, clever headers! The average header that is displayed is only abut 25 characters which isn't much so I've shrunk my subject lines down much smaller so that at least everyone gets the full benefit it just people reading on a computer screen.

Every day is a learning curve for me at the moment so I think this is a great place to share experiences and insight so I hope this post has helped a couple of people whoa re jut starting out and looking for some help.

Would be good to hear if anyone has got any mistakes they made in the early days too? (Makes me feel better about myself mainly!)
#creating #emails #friendly #made #mistakes #mobile
  • Profile picture of the author desireedavid
    I don't use bullet points in my emails, especially if I am telling a story. I usually just put a spacing between paragraphs to make it easier for the eyes.

    A couple of years ago when I first started sending out emails, I would always include my store's acronym in the subject line: "YSM Clearance Sale" or "New Arrivals at YSM". Now, I have learned to make it sound more creative and appealing. I have also done away with the acronym.
    Signature
    “Creativity is intelligence having fun.” – Albert Einstein
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  • Profile picture of the author james flynn
    Originally Posted by adamcurran View Post

    Email marketing is the way forward right now and while it might not bring the best results for everyone, it's definitely high on my list of priorities for my marketing.

    There is one area that I hadn't been focussing on though and that's making the emails mobile friendly.

    The program I use gives you a mobile friendly preview which I thought was enough, but I read somewhere in the past couple of months that most of the population check their emails on a mobile device these days, so with that I realised it was something I'd need to put some extra attention into.

    Websites do look totally different on a small screen compared to a laptop so I've focussed on some specific areas in my emails of late to make them mobile friendly, and I thought I'd pass on what I've been doing as it seems to be working.

    1) Swap paragraphs for bullet points.
    This is a big one. I like my emails to tell a story and create relationship with the reader which is all well and good on a big screen. The downside to this though is that is someone's reading it on a mobile, that point is likely or be lost and just look like a great big chunk of text which, if someone's in a rush, who's going to read it??

    2) Decrease the size of images.
    I'd never even considered this so while I'm searching for the best stock images around, the size of them was actually slowing down loading times on a mobile view. This meant that people are clicking, waiting and then getting distracted so not even reading the content.

    I stull use the same images but just resize them in a picture editor program to make sure it doesn't halt the loading time.

    3) Highlight CTA
    Again, I liked to be a bit more subtle with my CTA by hiding them in my content., however I don't think this is a good thing to do for any emails, regardless of whether they're mobile friendly (you live and learn!) For mobile emails though I've made sure that I have three prominent CTA buttons (BUY NOW mostly) so that id someone is scanning on their phone then they know exactly how they can give me their money without having to delve into, or even read, the bulk of the copy.

    4) Shrink headlines.
    Again, I thought the longer the better but it turned out that most of my readers were only getting to see the first dew word of my witty, clever headers! The average header that is displayed is only abut 25 characters which isn't much so I've shrunk my subject lines down much smaller so that at least everyone gets the full benefit it just people reading on a computer screen.

    Every day is a learning curve for me at the moment so I think this is a great place to share experiences and insight so I hope this post has helped a couple of people whoa re jut starting out and looking for some help.

    Would be good to hear if anyone has got any mistakes they made in the early days too? (Makes me feel better about myself mainly!)
    As a matter of fact putting way too much emphasis on text based information bores the reader and he/she gets distracted from the reason they came on the site. Therefore , it's always productive use CTA statements every now and then if you want to squeeze money from your customer's pocket.
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