How far apart should my soft selling emails be?

9 replies
Hi guys,

I've got a 52 autoesponder series. I have 10 emails in this autoresponder series that soft sell a product.The other 42 emails provide valuable information to the subscriber (no selling).

How far apart should these 10 soft-selling emails be? Should I space them evenly apart? or should they be grouped together?

Is it actually possible to overwhelm the subscriber with soft selling?

Thanks in advance
#emails #selling #soft
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Miladinov
    Hey BluesPlayer, so in essence, it really comes down to what niche are you sending these and the type of audience you are sending to.

    Could you tell us a bit more information?

    From what I hear, I believe that having a set schedule would be great, cos they are coming off as subscriber newsletters. You can even tell your mail list when they will get them, for e.g. monday and thursday. Or maybe weekend would be better for some niches.

    Get back if you can with more information about the niche and audience.
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    • Profile picture of the author BluesPlayer
      Originally Posted by Dan Miladinov View Post

      Hey BluesPlayer, so in essence, it really comes down to what niche are you sending these and the type of audience you are sending to.

      Could you tell us a bit more information?

      Get back if you can with more information about the niche and audience.
      Hi Dan thanks for the reply. The niche is fitness and the audience is males 40-60 years old.

      Can my soft sell emails be clumped together (one after another) or should they be spaced out by a month or so? I'm sending an email every month.
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      • Profile picture of the author JPs copy
        I've seen both. I've seen soft sell emails clumped together and I've seen them spaced out between content. Even if they sign up to get newsletters, they probably know deep down at some point you're going to sell them something.

        That's not necessarily a bad thing. If what you're selling will genuinely help your list, by all means, sell away.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan Miladinov
        I agree with JPs copy.

        Since we are in an era with newsletters being weekly or bi-weekly, your audience is used to getting emails, and something like 2 per month should be cool.

        But it really comes down to experimenting. Split the audience, try some once per month, 2 times per month, and weekly. See how it goes.

        I really have never targeted that specific niche, and can't guarantee anything, so testing will work best, and I don't think you can really go wrong here.
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      • I agree with everyone. Since your target audience is of a higher age and won't necessarily work anymore (in some cases) I don't think they'd be mad to get one a few times a week. Maybe just not daily
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  • Profile picture of the author ibramster
    Test your audience as has been said already. To the point that the emails could be daily. Yes daily, you need to keep your business at the front of the readers mind and not let them slip away to your competition. If they are on your list as an interest then they are likely on someone else's related list as well.

    Personally I see 42 areas that you are letting sales slip away. These are the emails where you don't sell. If you are offering value in the message then why not use that value and entertainment (story telling to build a bond with you and the reader) to make a sale? Seems crazy to me at least to have your target audience there in front of you more than likely expecting you to sell to them and you don't take advantage of that.
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    fastbusinessgrowth4u.com Direct marketing coach and guest writer. Always looking to network with site/blog and list owners. PM me.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    Every email I send out daily is a hard sell. Subscribers already know you're trying to sell them something, so don't be a wimp. If they unsubscribe, they most likely are not a good prospect.

    But consistently offer value, so subscribers anticipate your email and warm up to your relevant offers. If you are not hitting them up hard everyday, someone else will.

    Especially in hotly competitive niches such as health or fitness, establish intent early on - right on the subscription form. Your competition does not mess around with "soft" selling; neither should you.
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  • Profile picture of the author TobiMDD
    I agree with ibramster and myob..you operate a business, you are a marketer, you need to combine selling and giving value all the time
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    • Profile picture of the author ibramster
      TobiMDD
      1 hour ago
      I agree with ibramster and myob..you operate a business, you are a marketer, you need to combine selling and giving value all the time
      Boom, there you have it! Absolutely TobiMDD, does a shop stop selling when you walk in? No, they want you to buy every time you come in so why would an email be any different?
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      fastbusinessgrowth4u.com Direct marketing coach and guest writer. Always looking to network with site/blog and list owners. PM me.
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