How to become an expert in a new niche?

30 replies
I have read tons of information here on the forum, and my question is how do you become an expert in a niche. For example a niche you have some experience in, but don't know how to get that extra edge to really be unique, and give 100% unique but valuable content. How would you go about this?
#expert #niche
  • Profile picture of the author johnben1444
    Become an expert in IM and every niche you enter will be piece of cake.
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    • Originally Posted by johnben1444 View Post

      Become an expert in IM and every niche you enter will be piece of cake.
      That didn't answer my question. But thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author oWEN tEBB
    Well by doing your own homework. Research top sources, ask questions and use that information to provide great value. Obviously it helps if you have an interest in the niche you selected but sometimes that not always possible.

    It happened to me early in my career and I basically spent 2 weeks researching and creating original content from the research. It started slow but the more I got into it the more success I was having. My passion was shining through. Now my passion wasn't in the niche, my passion was providing quality content.

    Don't forget that you can make money of primary and secondary niches and what I mean by that is.....

    say your chosen niche is fitness (primary) you can then go into how to build an athelete body(secondary) this way you laser focusing a bigger audience, meaning better chance of making money. Lets be honest we are all in it for the money right?

    Anyway I kind of hope this helps but I can go into more detail if you want....

    Best of luck

    Owen
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  • Dude this is easy but no one will believe me, but I'll tell you then you decide or test it.

    I stupid/ignorant school no degree dropout can sit next to a Yale graduate and in 5 minutes be the expert to the 100 people in the room where the other person is not.

    How?

    By giving a tip or offering something they recognize as real value that helps them, gives a benefit or solves a problem.

    The cool thing is you can do this online for free.

    So in 5 minutes you can be the expert to the people who watch or hear or read what you have. I get it that most people disagree but true is true. The reason we are brainwashed is so we can get in debt and own hundreds of thousands in educational loans but that is what I think is wrong. You don't need a Yale degree to be an expert. You can be a homeless no body and be an expert tomorrow. That is true, just because pay it's not doesn't mean it's a lie.
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    • Originally Posted by HelpingYouBeAnExpert View Post

      Dude this is easy but no one will believe me, but I'll tell you then you decide or test it.

      I stupid/ignorant school no degree dropout can sit next to a Yale graduate and in 5 minutes be the expert to the 100 people in the room where the other person is not.

      How?

      By giving a tip or offering something they recognize as real value that helps them, gives a benefit or solves a problem.

      The cool thing is you can do this online for free.

      So in 5 minutes you can be the expert to the people who watch or hear or read what you have. I get it that most people disagree but true is true. The reason we are brainwashed is so we can get in debt and own hundreds of thousands in educational loans but that is what I think is wrong. You don't need a Yale degree to be an expert. You can be a homeless no body and be an expert tomorrow. That is true, just because pay it's not doesn't mean it's a lie.
      Depends what you define as an "expert."

      Because if you think about it, can you go program a software in 5 minutes of study? Obviously I am using an extreme example to prove my point, but there is easier niches obviously.

      When I mean how do I become an expert I mean, if I was going to be an expert in say, sewing a shirt from scratch, how can I become an expert in that field like a programmer would be in his field?
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Focus on one small segment of the niche at a time. Learn all you can about that targeted segment. Go to the search engines, Google the phrase, then visit the sites of the top results. Experience what's going on. Notice who are the thought leaders, the top entrepreneurs, and the academics in that space. Join discussions in the top forums - ask questions - read all you can.

      Once you do that in just one segment, you can begin to let others know what valuable and relevant information your have found. Blog about your discovery. Volunteer to do guest posting. Engage with your subscribers on the subject. You will know more than 95% of those in the niche.

      Then add another segment of the niche and do the same learning and discovery as before. You conquer one segment at a time, all the while sharing what you are learning so that others will benefit from your newly found knowledge.

      I think the idea is to discuss those topics that you have studied but don't claim to be an expert in the whole niche. As topics come up that you don't know you can note them and do some study/discovery when you get time.

      Do you see how it's really an advantage to already have a foundation of knowledge and experience as you go into a niche? It doesn't mean that you know it all or that you don't have to learn new things . . . but it sure cuts down the time it takes to build a solid foundation of the niche basics when you go in with your cup already filled!

      Good luck to you,

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Customary excellent advice from Steve ^^^.

        It's not always easy: you often need to find some sort of compromise between the two important things, really ...

        1. A niche you either have enthusiasm/knowledge for to start with, or at least one for which you have enough interest to feel that it would be "bearable" to acquire the knowledge, and ...

        2. A niche with a real, specifically definable market which has a few (not just 1 or 2) products available which you think you'd be willing to promote.

        There's no point in being a passionate enthusiast of something too obscure to have anything to sell! On the other hand, there's definitely no point in going into a niche just because it has great demand, if you know absolutely nothing about it and have no real interest in it, because (a) that will always be a chore that you'll quickly come to resent and dislike, and (b) everyone else is already trying to sell in those niches, anyway.

        So you sometimes need a "compromise", of some kind, to be realistic, but being interested in it yourself is always a big advantage.

        For myself, I always prefer really small, specifically targeted niches to big markets: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post8561081

        I also generally prefer "enthusiasts' niches" to "problem-solving niches": http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post9408026

        .
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Adding onto Steve's excellent answer, don't be afraid to acknowledge other experts.

        A lot of the "fake it until you make it" crowd will tell you to find an expert and go sentence by sentence rewriting what they wrote and then claim it as your own "unique" contribution.

        Much better, and more believable, is to acknowledge the expert, credit the source, summarize it and provide your own spin. Commenting on the work of another like this makes you a peer, at least in perception, and puts you on the same level.

        There's another way.

        You could try what some of my pro angler friends always call BIB. It stands for "Butt In Boat."

        If you want to put yourself out there as an expert in constructing shirts, make some shirts. Make enough of them that you are good at it.

        Unfortunately, for a lot of wannabe experts that's too much like work. (Pardon my language... )
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve B
          Lexy's point about compromise is so true. It's why I'm a big fan of very deep and narrow niches. It makes your learning and study, not really easier, but certainly less daunting when you are focusing like a laser on one desire, one product you're selling, one specific problem. Also, when you choose to be in a very narrow market, you often don't have the competition from the huge well-healed businesses that have to market to the masses to survive.

          John's comment about acknowledging other experts and authorities already in the niche is perfect! They will appreciate you for it and your prospects/subscribers will not degrade your status because of it. No one has all the answers, especially someone newly on the scene. Give credit where it is due. See if you can get some of the experts to put content on your site. Interview them if you can.

          It really is pretty easy to spot the wannabe experts.

          Here's my definition of an expert: an ordinary guy a safe distance from home!

          The best to all of you.

          Steve
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      • Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

        Focus on one small segment of the niche at a time. Learn all you can about that targeted segment. Go to the search engines, Google the phrase, then visit the sites of the top results. Experience what's going on. Notice who are the thought leaders, the top entrepreneurs, and the academics in that space. Join discussions in the top forums - ask questions - read all you can.

        Once you do that in just one segment, you can begin to let others know what valuable and relevant information your have found. Blog about your discovery. Volunteer to do guest posting. Engage with your subscribers on the subject. You will know more than 95% of those in the niche.

        Then add another segment of the niche and do the same learning and discovery as before. You conquer one segment at a time, all the while sharing what you are learning so that others will benefit from your newly found knowledge.

        I think the idea is to discuss those topics that you have studied but don't claim to be an expert in the whole niche. As topics come up that you don't know you can note them and do some study/discovery when you get time.

        Do you see how it's really an advantage to already have a foundation of knowledge and experience as you go into a niche? It doesn't mean that you know it all or that you don't have to learn new things . . . but it sure cuts down the time it takes to build a solid foundation of the niche basics when you go in with your cup already filled!

        Good luck to you,

        Steve
        Awesome advice Steve. That will definitely get me started down the right path. Currently seeking a niche which I am interested in, and looked at a few that I have experience in but couldn't find much affiliate programs in it. So Just brainstorming right now.

        That might be an indicator that either there is no market for it, or that no one has created a product around it. Probably the first one.
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  • Profile picture of the author gamestoenjoy
    I have a game site (so my niche is the gaming niche).
    I have a lot of knowledge in this niche because I play games all the time.
    So I guess that if you have some prior experience in your niche, it will help you to succeed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Step 1: Forget about becoming an expert in a new niche.

    Don't strive to be an expert. Strive to make money. That's the name of the game. Any other purpose is futile and is just causing more bad CO2 emissions into the atmosphere.

    Lol...

    Real talk though, if you want to become an expert, be everywhere your target market hangs out at. Give great advice, but make sure you're practicing what you preach. Dominate youtube, social media sites, have a great following on facebook, do lots of joint ventures, attend seminars and meetings offline in your niche, get interviewed by people, get alot of affiliates promoting your stuff, get on Amazon and Barnes and Nobles.... well you get my point.

    Make the money man. That's it. That's what you're here for.
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  • Profile picture of the author gluckspilz
    You become an expert by actually becoming an expert...

    On the other hand, you can become an authority with just knowledge
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Del
    I wouldn't have too many niches going on but that's just me. I would focus on 1 niche and dominate it like no other, you will be an expert in time.

    Why not outsource your content? I outsource content from sites like iwriter.com and odesk. They're pretty cheap and you only pay for the content if you like it. So they allow you to review the content before you pay for it, you can ask the writer to re-write the article with better details or simply have another writer do it.

    Hope this helps
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  • Profile picture of the author jdudley
    I think you're overthinking this. Being an expert and being "perceived" as an expert are two different things. All you have to do is know more than the next guy. Go with what you know, and learn as you go, but GO.
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  • Profile picture of the author schttrj
    So, who's an Expert?

    Someone who knows everything about a particular subject?

    Or...

    Someone who knows more than the person reading his work?

    You have actually posed a very interesting question, to be honest.

    Also, going by your example, if you really want to be a programmer, you don't want to spend your day on the web, reading others' blogs and participating in forums.

    You need to actually hit the library, read academic papers and journals and take certification exams. Then you actually qualify as a newbie "programmer" in the first place.

    So, if you want to be a REAL expert in any field, go study!

    But if you are bitten by the IM bug and want to make money online, as the poster above me already said, being an expert and being perceived as an expert are completely different things.

    You just need to know more than the next "programmer". Market dynamics, my friend. Simple.

    In that case, you just need to learn a new language, start creating a few programs, keep learning and still call yourself a "programmer".

    The choice is yours.
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    It all depends on how you define expert. Becoming a true expert in a field or market can take a lifetime.

    On the other hand, if you choose a small enough niche, you can become an "expert" in a relatively short period of time. Read up on a smaller niche you're interested in for 30 minutes to an hour a day and within a couple weeks you'll know enough to at least hold your own in niche-related discussions on the Internet.

    If you've already got working knowledge of a niche and are looking to really delve deep in order to get unique content, you've got to get off the beaten path. Most marketers don't go any further than the first few pages of Google when researching topics they're planning on writing on. That's why you see the same rehashed garbage in a lot of the more popular niches.

    If you do your research in places that most content creators don't go like local libraries and book stores, trade shows and old magazines and by contacting experts in the field and asking them questions, you'll be a step ahead of much of the competition. If you're in a science-based market, scientific journals and research reports can be a great source of information as long as you're willing to dig deep into the reports for useful tidbits of information.

    You don't necessarily have to be an expert in a topic to sell products in a niche. As long as you're able to research a topic and intelligently write about it, you'll give off the appearance of being an expert long before you actually become one.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by gluckspilz View Post

      You become an expert by actually becoming an expert...

      On the other hand, you can become an authority with just knowledge
      This is an excellent distinction.
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  • All it takes is time. Consistent research and apply what you know to your own business model.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
      Good advice in this thread. Other than what people have already said - concerning "how to get that important edge and become an expert in your niche"?

      Interesting question: I don't believe I've ever heard a question concerning a niche put that way. Meaning how do you get that extra edge after finding a niche. I think most people just assume when you find a niche you'll automatically have an edge - just by the definition. Just like water and wet go together, you have one so you have the other.

      You have good insight by not assuming this about a niche.

      Here's a short answer:

      I'd suggest finding out what your competitors and/or people in your market "hate to do" in your niche and become an expert at it.

      Here's the almost instant advangtages you create ...

      • You''ll have very little (and often no) competition!
      • You'll stand out like a sore thumb!
      -and -
      • Eventually you'll discover some of your competitors customers and maybe even a few competitors coming to you! Note: Provided you market yourself (and your "edge") accordingly.

      That's the first things I do myself or suggest to clients when they go into a new market - with established competition.

      Give it a go! Good Luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Manish Sapkota
    Just focus on a small micro niche to be expert on.
    Buy some info products related to the niche. It is better to take training from already expert person.
    If it is expensive tot take training, just google search about the topic you want to be expert. Information are found everywhere in the internet nowadays for free. Research the information and you will be expert.
    Note: You should have passion in your niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author dariusdarius
    If you want to become an expert you should start by knowing the people in that particular niche. who are you selling to? Create the most specific description of your regular buyer.

    This way you will understand what that person needs and know how what to product to push them.
    Also, inspect your competition and see what you need to improve, keep in mind there is always room for improvement to any product.

    Start being active in forums, search for jv partners.

    Darius
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  • Profile picture of the author gvidass
    If I were you would take all information, which I can, would read everything do all kind of researchs and try to contact with other people, who have the same interest... It's what I would do
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  • Profile picture of the author richardsteels
    I guess, work hard, study what you have to study and then just give it your best. maybe thats how you become an expert in whatever. don't really know just sharing my thoughts
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  • Profile picture of the author Adie
    Originally Posted by rankingspecialist View Post

    I have read tons of information here on the forum, and my question is how do you become an expert in a niche. For example a niche you have some experience in, but don't know how to get that extra edge to really be unique, and give 100% unique but valuable content. How would you go about this?
    here is a little story that might be of any help.
    How to Find a Thousand Dollar Niche
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    Moderator's Note: You're only allowed to put your own products or sites in your signature.

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  • If this doesn't help nothing will it's a true story. I went to my first free seminar, they sold me $160 ticket to an entrepreneur club. Went to the first club meeting. 200+ people there. Keep in mind from the "selling is evil" communist country in East Europe and never sold in my life. Also I'm fat sick ugly and English is my second language (I"m better looking now since I cured my poisoning that made me fat). In any case I get there I see like 40 people lined up they get the mike for like 1 minute each then the sell whatever. I never sold. I go to this back table ask them can I sell? They said sure, give me $600 you get 1 minute. I say ok, give credit card, by the time I do all this only 3 or 4 people left I get behind them and do my first pitch in my life , by the way I have no product or company or anything but I had the idea to try to sell make them a website which I have no clue how to make but a guy in Pakistan made me one for $250. The moral is not that I sold my first site for $1500 that night but people came up to me and I was instantly the expert in websites even that I don't know how to make them, have no degree, certification or anything, it's just that I pitched it. So what's the moral? If I can be the expert so can you. Don't listen to the morons who tell you how hard it is, it's not hard. Good luck!
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    soon people... Relax...
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  • I'll call this article Mr. Know it All
    I have realized I have been trying to be Mr. Know it All. Yes that’s a song by Kelly Clarkson.

    The point of this article is to prove that you don’t need to know it all. What I took away from this thread is to start small. Learn something super small. And teach it to someone else. And people will respect you for going out of your way to genuinely show them what you know: because everyone knows how to do something. You got to this website. You know how to read what’s on this website. ::at least I hope you do:: You can teach someone else to get to this site.

    I have always been trying to be Mr. Know it all: that every time that I was going to dive into a new niche, I would try to understand big topic generics. And the generics of a topic always simplify the topic to make it seem like it’s an easy topic to understand. And I would fall into that. Once I realized that there was a lot more to know about a topic, a lot of tedious details, I would quit as soon as I could.

    I would do this over and over and over. Since I was a really small child I got this belief that if I didn’t know it all, I’d be left out. And we all know that it’s impossible to know it all.

    So after Steve told me to start in small segments it made sense. But I was still stuck in Mr. Know It All. But it finally clicked. It’s okay not to know it all. It’s okay to start small. Maybe even charge someone a dollar for something. You’ll start building a reputation at least. And if you do more than what you are asked for, you are bound to learn new skills along the way. You will begin to understand another segment. Which will make you more valuable, until you do master it all; and even if you don’t you are bound to be valuable?

    And like Alexa said if you like the topic somewhat, I’ll be much easier to learn about it. And if there is no market for it, at least you didn’t invest too much into a niche that doesn’t sell. Of course that moment can teach you what does sell within the niche as well.

    If you know where one can learn something but you don’t know it yet, and you direct them somewhere else, that’s value in its self. So there is always something you can do like John said.

    But just go for it. Don’t be a Mr. Know it all.
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  • If you think about it anyone can claim to be an expert/professional. What makes someone a expert on a certain subject? If you were to ask me that question i would answer with knowledge. Learning everything you can about a subject and continue to follow the evolution of said subject is what in my opinion is an expert/professional
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert02011
    Originally Posted by rankingspecialist View Post

    I have read tons of information here on the forum, and my question is how do you become an expert in a niche. For example a niche you have some experience in, but don't know how to get that extra edge to really be unique, and give 100% unique but valuable content. How would you go about this?
    Find someone who is a success in your niche and follow what they do!
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    I`am looking for an honest legal business that can make real money online.
    I found one ??????http://successxxx.com

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