Guest Post: how do you approach blogs to write for them?

7 replies
Hey everyone,

I'll launch my blog in a few days and I want to start doing some guest posts on other blogs.
My question is: how do you go about and ask someone if you can write a guest post for their blogs? What has worked for you?

Cheers,
StevieT
#approach #blogs #guest #post #write
  • Profile picture of the author MayaMagpie
    Bloggers usually don't like it when someone approaches them out of the blue and asks for a favour... Make a list of blogs that you would like to guest blog for, then take the time to read a few posts and make helpful comments first.
    When you email them, ask them what you can do for them before you ask them your favour. Also include a list of possible post headlines, and a link to posts you have already written so they can see what your style is like.

    Hope that helps!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583440].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by MayaMagpie View Post

      When you email them, ask them what you can do for them before you ask them your favour.
      I don't ask them a favor. At all.

      I offer them a favor (a guest post), and I do so on the basis of their site/blog/traffic/interests/content, which I discuss in detail.

      I make the preliminary email all about them, not about me.

      .
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583453].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kilgore
    I can speak to this more from the perspective as someone you'd be asking than someone who tries to get guest posts. So to me the most effective pitches are when someone:
    • Sends me a well-crafted query letter. It should provide enough detail so that I know what your article is (or will be), but also be brief enough so that I'll actually read it. If you have the entire article, you can attach it, but the query letter is still crucial as I won't want to read the entire article unless I'm already intrigued.
    • Understands my site and my audience. Take some time to read my site, see the kind of things we post (especially from guest bloggers) and the kind of comments and other reaction we get. Tailor your pitch to each site.
    • Has a history of good writing (and success). If you don't have anything public in the topic area that you'll be trying to post in wait a bit. Those blogs will still be there in a month. I know you're in a hurry, but you really only do have one shot to make a first impression and if you mail me too early, I might remember you as that person who never wrote anything rather than that person who hasn't written much, but what he did write was really good. Point out some of your better posts in your query letter. Incidentally, it's definitely not unheard of to reprint a prior blog -- so even if it's already on your site you can pitch it if it's relevant and good.
    • Has a relationship with me. If you've already written for me once and it went well, it will be a lot easier the second time. Unfortunately, getting your foot in the door is the hardest part.

    Also, be persistent (though not annoying). If someone says, "No" it might just be a timing issue. And it also goes without saying that smaller blogs are a lot easier to get into. These may not get you as much exposure right away, but they might help you work your way up!

    I should also mention that the list above is my ideal. If your query letter isn't perfect, if you don't have 1,000,000 blog posts to your name, if you don't understand my site 100%, you can still be successful. But if you do the above -- at least with me -- you'll increase your chances a lot.

    Finally, there are place you can post your articles where people looking for content can find them and use them on their sites. I personally don't use them, so I'd rather someone with actual experience in that area let you know how that works.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583490].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author StevieT
    Awesome guys, thanks a lot for your answers! I know what to do now:

    - First make some helpful comments;
    - Then offer them a letter with a proposal for a guest post!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583588].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by kilgore View Post

      I can speak to this more from the perspective as someone you'd be asking than someone who tries to get guest posts. So to me the most effective pitches are when someone:
      • Sends me a well-crafted query letter. It should provide enough detail so that I know what your article is (or will be), but also be brief enough so that I'll actually read it. If you have the entire article, you can attach it, but the query letter is still crucial as I won't want to read the entire article unless I'm already intrigued.
      • Understands my site and my audience. Take some time to read my site, see the kind of things we post (especially from guest bloggers) and the kind of comments and other reaction we get. Tailor your pitch to each site.
      • Has a history of good writing (and success). If you don't have anything public in the topic area that you'll be trying to post in wait a bit. Those blogs will still be there in a month. I know you're in a hurry, but you really only do have one shot to make a first impression and if you mail me too early, I might remember you as that person who never wrote anything rather than that person who hasn't written much, but what he did write was really good. Point out some of your better posts in your query letter. Incidentally, it's definitely not unheard of to reprint a prior blog -- so even if it's already on your site you can pitch it if it's relevant and good.
      • Has a relationship with me. If you've already written for me once and it went well, it will be a lot easier the second time. Unfortunately, getting your foot in the door is the hardest part.

      Also, be persistent (though not annoying). If someone says, "No" it might just be a timing issue. And it also goes without saying that smaller blogs are a lot easier to get into. These may not get you as much exposure right away, but they might help you work your way up!

      I should also mention that the list above is my ideal. If your query letter isn't perfect, if you don't have 1,000,000 blog posts to your name, if you don't understand my site 100%, you can still be successful. But if you do the above -- at least with me -- you'll increase your chances a lot.

      Finally, there are place you can post your articles where people looking for content can find them and use them on their sites. I personally don't use them, so I'd rather someone with actual experience in that area let you know how that works.
      1) I wish I could hit the 'Thanks' button twice for this one.

      2) I wish I'd written it.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583675].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        1) I wish I could hit the 'Thanks' button twice for this one.

        2) I wish I'd written it.
        My exact thoughts, also.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9583684].message }}

Trending Topics