I think i may have found my niche!

by bsurb 36 replies
Just like any other day, i am always thinking of ideas and writing them down on paper to figure out what niche to pursue. After long days of research and brainstorming i think i may be closing in towards a niche....

"Music promotion for unsigned artists"

I am currently in college studying public relations and i have had interest in the music field for years now. I have a large fan base on twitter (over 8k followers) and its mainly music artists who have no fans or just music fans in general. Now i have been selling music services for a while such as getting legit music plays and finding blog features for my clients. They paid me a monthly price but now iv been thinking out the box....

I have my main website (myname.com) with my picture, resume etc. I will be offering services such as web design, upselling and letting artists know that its EXTREMELY important and crucial that you have a live website promoting your music. Not just youtube,soundcloud etc. Create a sales pitch and once i find a sale pitch that works, copy and use for every client. Upsell my other promotional services with the website package deal.

I can focus on the necessary keywords that unknown artists are searching for on google, looking for a music publicist or someone to promote their music. Have a timeframe chart with prices of all my services listed on my site, that can be at least $500-600 an artist...

on top of that... i do vinyl lettering at my house. Another promotional strategy i could use is their twitter names or music name turned into a sticker of different colors will help spread their music out by handing them out at shows and events. And i make the stickers at my house... so thats more revenue coming my way.

I have been lazy the past 9 months while i was suppose to be promoting my services but from reading about niches and SEO and things like that i believe this is what i want to do. I love music, i go to school for public relations, and im not creating some ordinary general music news blog...

Thoughts?
#main internet marketing discussion forum #found #niche
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  • Profile picture of the author artflair
    My advice for you is this - first find out if there's any money to be made within the niche...
    Do your research - if other people are doing a similar thing and are successful then it is a green light for you to go ahead!
    There's nothing worse than investing your time, energy and money in something that doesn't work - that's why you have to do your research up front!
    Good luck
    Art
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    I know companies who charge $x,xxx to use them and they are actual pr firms. But even younger teens who want to become music artists or make music dont have that kind of money to invest on their music. Thats why i create the website, and offer promotional services since i have connections and a background in the music industry. Iv also seen people over twitter offer promotional services but they dont offer ALL services including website creations, vinyl decal making etc. Instead of going and hiring several different companies, i offer all services under myself...

    I used the google keyword planner tool and seen some keywords that i would like to rank for. $3.60 for bids and medium to low competition. Even though im still learning how to properly read the tool.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lightlysalted
    Having a passion for a particular niche is very important. However others are right you need to see if you can make money from this particular niche. My suggestion is to do some searches in ADwords and find out how much you can get per click in that particular niche.

    Obviously there are also affiliate programs and solo ads you can promote to generate revenue but ad words generally gives you a feel for the market.
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  • Profile picture of the author cyberzolo
    Good for you! Now get started...
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Even if im offering such service, you recommend i put up google adsense ?? Because this may be a little different than just creating an ordinary blog. Im actually offering services
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Even if im offering such service, you recommend i put up google adsense ??
      I recommend that you avoid it.

      It conflicts to some extent with your intended site's purpose, and will also detract from the site itself.

      With AdSense, you get paid (typically pennies) when people leave your site, and need a site layout designed to encourage people to click on AdSense links. For other forms of monetization, you generally want traffic to stay and interact as much as possible, not to leave.

      .
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  • Profile picture of the author IulianP
    They see you as an artist right? What does that have to do with web design?

    Nothing.

    Even if you convince them that a website is really important for an artist (which I doubt unless you are famous and you can sell branded stuff to earn more) you will not be considered as the "to go person" for web design stuff.

    They are still growing, they probably don't have money and probably a lot of them are waiting for the big fish to hear their songs and make some magic happen. (same as warrior forum newbies looking for the magic button in the wso's).

    However, you could try selling them how to make money affiliate products or guitar lessons products (that kind of stuff).
    As for adsense, try it for 1 month then switch to affiliate products and try for another month. Pick the best and stick with it.

    It might sound drammatic but nothing is easy . Testing is the key.
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    No, they don't see me as an "artist." They are my clients/artists. I have a resume put together of my skills and people who I have worked for in the past (Which some are famous). I couldn't tell you how many people have actually hit me up on Twitter and send me messages all the time asking about my publicist services. I get daily tweets from people wanting me to listen to their music. If I listen to it and believe that its capable of going somewhere then I approach them with my services and tell them what I have to offer....

    My college major is public relations. A music publicist is what I want to do for a career anyways so its building my resume/helping me gain more knowledge anyways.
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  • Profile picture of the author MrFume
    I think that is excellent, but the tribe you are cultivating are not known for having a lot of cash to spare, struggling artists of any kind are always open to being helped, but if you are looking to be paid for offering the help, well good luck with that. Not meaning to be negative here, it is just the reality - if you find a good angle, well best of good fortune.
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  • Profile picture of the author tjaysen70
    Hey brotha,

    Ya know, you've gotta go with your gut, and it sounds like you're young, so take a chance.

    I will say however, that as a professional musician myself, and knowing how musicians are and that 99% of them have no money, and the money they do have isn't spent on promoting the band, well you might have a niche that is tough to get money from.

    So might be a good idea, but think about targeting those that run the band, like the managers.
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Well the artists who actually have gone that far and have hired a manager, yes I am more likely to speak to them. I approach most artists and they tell me to talk to their managers because they are unaware of how the promotional stuff works... I think there is plenty of $$ in the market. Its just about ranking on google because people are searching for them. And reaching out to artists on social networks.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Well the artists who actually have gone that far and have hired a manager, yes I am more likely to speak to them. I approach most artists and they tell me to talk to their managers because they are unaware of how the promotional stuff works... I think there is plenty of $$ in the market. Its just about ranking on google because people are searching for them. And reaching out to artists on social networks.
      Are you sure people are searching for a publicist on Google? For me, that would be the last place I'd look, simply because the ability to rank a website is hardly proof of competence in promoting a band.

      As far as the dollars go, you might consider stealing a page from Kevin O'Leary's playbook on Shark Tank and think "royalty deal"...
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Its just about ranking on google because people are searching for them.
      Call me a skepchick, but I really think this is most unlikely to be the most appropriate approach (and that's quite apart from all the other drawbacks of trying to attract traffic in this way). I'd think that finding targeted traffic through "places where artists are already looking" would be a far better prospect. I think it may be time to try to put your ideal customer's hat on, and start thinking about where (apart from "in search engines") s/he's "already looking".

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author Nickels
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        Call me a skepchick, but I really think this is most unlikely to be the most appropriate approach (and that's quite apart from all the other drawbacks of trying to attract traffic in this way). I'd think that finding targeted traffic through "places where artists are already looking" would be a far better prospect. I think it may be time to try to put your ideal customer's hat on, and start thinking about where (apart from "in search engines") s/he's "already looking".

        .
        I agree. You already said you have people from twitter contacting you already...why not continue to grow your social media presence. Thats where artists are hanging out, trying to share and promote their music.
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  • Profile picture of the author gamestoenjoy
    I am glad you found your niche!

    I found my niche (which is the gaming niche) long time ago, becuace I am crazy about onilne games, and know a lot about it.
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Well how else are artists going to find a publicist? They dont come knocking on their door
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    That's where I mainly hang out and engage is on Twitter.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bengood
    A concern that some people are having is that you are a shady person trying to take money from artists. Of-course you aren't shady, you are trying to do some good. And to answer the question of who has the money? that would be the fans.
    my suggestion is to put something on the sites so the fans can pay you,
    maybe a donation button saying donate to bsurb so more artist can get websites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nickels
    So continue to use twitter along with other social media platforms to build your business. Thats your best bet vs search engine traffic imo.
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  • Profile picture of the author Luke Dennison
    Why not offer a service to them, like you will manage there facebook accounts for $20 a month etc.

    Say that you will increase engagement etc.

    Luke
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Yeah I guess I could continue to use Twitter. I gain real followers all of the time from forums and things like that. I am providing them real actual services though. I increase their twitter followers because I have over 8K and I get them blog features for their music.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Well how else are artists going to find a publicist? They dont come knocking on their door
      Oh, I don't know, maybe by asking other artists, or maybe hiring that person who helped them get featured on a music blog, or...

      There's definite trust issues involved, especially with "glamour" businesses like music or fashion. People are wary of sharks and con artists, and should be.

      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Yeah I guess I could continue to use Twitter. I gain real followers all of the time from forums and things like that. I am providing them real actual services though. I increase their twitter followers because I have over 8K and I get them blog features for their music.
      Use this as a springboard to expanding the services you provide.

      Another approach is to educate your target audience on publicity. Yes, some will do it themselves. More will try to do it themselves, and figure out how much time and effort it takes away from their music. Those people are prime candidates for your services, as are those who see your educational material and realize they're better off hiring an expert from the beginning.

      A publicist is different from a locksmith, where you just need someone close to let you into your car so any old service that pops up in a search will do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Trey Morgan
    I think you have found a great niche that is matches your skillset and background. Just by reading your post I can see that you have a clear idea on how you would do things, and it sounds good in theory. If I were you I would start testing your theory and see if you can get a sales funnel put together, and send some targeted traffic to it and then go from there.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ahsan C
    I suggest that you sit down with one artist and provide him all your services for free and see if you can actually solve his problems and provide him actual results. This will definitely put you face to face with unexpected problems and you will know first hand the challenges and rewards associated with the type of services you intend to provide.

    Be warned, SEO takes alot of effort and alot of time (atleast 6-8 months to see small results) and even after years and years of your SEO efforts, Google can wipe you off the first page overnight and there's nothing you can do about it. This dark fate has happened to so many, its hard to count.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nickels
      Originally Posted by Ahsan C View Post

      I suggest that you sit down with one artist and provide him all your services for free and see if you can actually solve his problems and provide him actual results. This will definitely put you face to face with unexpected problems and you will know first hand the challenges and rewards associated with the type of services you intend to provide.
      I agree completely. I work with numerous music artists and they want to see what you HAVE done for others... not what you SAY you can do.
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  • Profile picture of the author flesterking
    Unique idea, but will it convert. Test it before you get deep into it.
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Its not like I have to invest lots of money either. I have a resume built from working with a popular artist and his label back in 2006. Lots of artists see that as the green light to use any type of my service.

    I'm going to set my personal website up with price charts, current clients and about me page. Im going to try and engage with EVERYONE on Twitter about getting their music out there.

    At least if I can sell them a website service that's a +. Not much I need to prove as far as results there.

    But this shall be interesting, especially being what I am going to school for. Its good to carry on some knowledge to school rather than trying to learn it all at one time.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lyanna
    That's great. BTW, you haven't mentioned it but are you going to music venues/events in real life? Your website should have news and pics of you going to musical events so that people know you are for real. Obviously, bonus points if you have pics of yourself with well-known people. You know what they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.
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  • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
    Think this is a great area to focus on, definitely a need and desire for help out there - but it has to be backed with some proof.

    Do you have some examples where your work (PR or behind the scenes) has led to additional gigs or notice from major publishers?

    If not, I would work with some early customers at a greatly reduced rate in order to pull together some success stories...in this market, word-of-mouth and proof will go a LONG way.

    Once you have a case study or two, I would run a Google Hangout or Webinar that talks about what you can do for unsigned artists, go through what you did for your case study and let them know how they can start with you on a low-end (low risk) basis or ramp it up to a higher-end package.

    Is the main objective to get them more gigs or is it to get them noticed by major label/sponsor?

    Jeff
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    • Profile picture of the author bsurb
      Originally Posted by jbsmith View Post

      Think this is a great area to focus on, definitely a need and desire for help out there - but it has to be backed with some proof.

      Do you have some examples where your work (PR or behind the scenes) has led to additional gigs or notice from major publishers?

      If not, I would work with some early customers at a greatly reduced rate in order to pull together some success stories...in this market, word-of-mouth and proof will go a LONG way.

      Once you have a case study or two, I would run a Google Hangout or Webinar that talks about what you can do for unsigned artists, go through what you did for your case study and let them know how they can start with you on a low-end (low risk) basis or ramp it up to a higher-end package.

      Is the main objective to get them more gigs or is it to get them noticed by major label/sponsor?

      Jeff
      Excellent advice! The objective is to get their music heard by as many people possible. Example is: Getting their music featured on music blogs, send out email blasts, create a attention getter for the bio, press releases, things that the media typically covers.

      Can I guarantee them a contract to a major label? no.. but I can promise that they will see results. Stuff like this takes time. Kind of like the SEO process.
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

        Excellent advice! The objective is to get their music heard by as many people possible. Example is: Getting their music featured on music blogs, send out email blasts, create a attention getter for the bio, press releases, things that the media typically covers.

        Can I guarantee them a contract to a major label? no.. but I can promise that they will see results. Stuff like this takes time. Kind of like the SEO process.
        In the past I have done extensive work for a LARGE label, and many top acts. What you may have done for a client back in 2006 really has nothing to do with what you are going to do for a client today. Sure dropping the name may do you some good, but really rubber hitting the road... what is that going to do for your clients?

        The sentence above is a bit disturbing to me "The objective is to get their music heard by as many people possible." THAT is not the objective. If you want even a shot at a contract, being heard will get you no where. SELLING the music is the objective. If you can sell 100,000 d-loads on ITunes, you stand a chance at a record deal.

        Just remember to stay true to yourself, Go with what you know and work slowly into areas you may not be that familiar. Sounds like Twitter is "Your" thang, so start there. Develop a web platform based on YOUR business and create sub pages for the bands you are working with. If the bands you are working with want a page, they can pay for it.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    If they are serious musicians, they want gigs.
    They also want radio and internet (YouTube, iTunes, CDbaby...) play/sales.

    So, basically, you need to set up channels and develop industry connections to get that.
    Set up your own YouTube channel and cross promote theirs - and the like, get a working
    relationship with at least a handful of venues, state fairs, music festivals, get a working
    relationship with radio stations and other industry people. (When I say working relationship, I mean establish credibility with respect to your ability to pick winners and provide artists/bands that are good interviews, good acts that will be a draw, make venues/fairs/festivals money, be professional on stage, and not be prima donnas...)

    Learn the Billboard and Grammy process so you can help them there.

    Then, in addition to web design, you can offer all these pipelines.

    I don't like Bieber, but you help your artists reconstruct his path. I think basically, he got himself
    famous via YouTube.

    I do love Taylor Swift, and you can help artists reconstruct her path. She played in
    Nashville (The Bluebird I think. Same place where Faith Hill and others
    got noticed.) She came up with the song, "Tim McGraw" and did an extensive
    radio tour to promote it - bringing the staff homemade cookies... Connecting with
    Scotty Borchetta and helping start the Big Machine label...

    Strongly consider the publishing side of the business. Suppose you get a winner song,
    you can get a percent of royalties and not be an a** and share rights/fair splits
    with the artists and a more major label or publisher.

    One thing that's common with artists that make it to the regional or national level or
    bigger, is that they get a following playing primarily their original music. Artists that
    are primarily cover bands almost always remain local bands, maybe get in with a Casino
    chain or something like that.

    But, there is something to be said for coaching them to do a killer cover song.
    Suzy Bogguss and "Someday Soon". Faith Hill and "Piece of My Heart". Got them
    on the map.

    -----------

    On the other side of the coin, develop your own sales channel. In addition to the social media
    get your own website(s) and IM up for your services.

    Good luck. It's good to follow your passion.

    Dan

    Personally, I think major labels maybe help after an artist has done a hella lot direct to market,
    or they can keep going direct to market.

    Dakota Blonde uses the nimbit platform and it has some nice features,
    such as the pay per download and being easy for the band to edit.

    http://dakotablonde.com/

    http://www.nimbit.com/
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  • Profile picture of the author bsurb
    Wouldn't it make more sense to focus on a couple artists at a time? Quality over quantity right? I can find lots of clients and get paid but if it gets overwelmed and results dont show for all i get bad rep
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Wouldn't it make more sense to focus on a couple artists at a time? Quality over quantity right? I can find lots of clients and get paid but if it gets overwelmed and results dont show for all i get bad rep
      If you're asking me?

      Then, yes. And enough to provide the income you want from this venture.

      Your YouTube leg could have more artists than your other services, but make it quality and
      get it a watched channel.

      How many artists would you represent right now because you like what they do and think they are talented? Suppose that number is 50.

      Out of that 50, how many would choose you? How many would choose you and have money to pay you? And agree to your terms and actually sign up with you instead of a more established competitor?

      In other words, there's likely a numbers game to get the handful of quality artists you want to represent
      and have a viable business.
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Originally Posted by bsurb View Post

      Wouldn't it make more sense to focus on a couple artists at a time? Quality over quantity right? I can find lots of clients and get paid but if it gets overwelmed and results dont show for all i get bad rep
      If you are established and have a SYTSEM in place that actually produces RESULTS then yes you can focus on more than one client.

      It doesn't sound like you have this in place, so working with A ( ONE ) client is not going to ruin THEM and YOURSELF.

      You need to figure out what works and why. Only then would I suggest moving forward.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    $500 to $600 is probably to low for a custom site. Easier to negotiate down than up.

    This:
    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post9596839
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