Please Help A Friend Understand This Illogical Response

41 replies
Please note the following conversation and see if you can pick out the
illogic in it.

Marketer A - How much is the product?

Marketer B - $27

Marketer A - I'll give you $10 for it.

Marketer B - Sorry but it's $27. No discounts.

Marketer A - Please, it's not even worth the $10.

Okay, this is where I will stop.

If it's not even worth the $10, why does marketer A want it?

I am trying to understand the mindset of people who reply back with
comments like that.

Here is my theory. Please feel free to give me yours because I do not in
any way claim to know the answer to this.

My theory is that the person is trying to rationalize his decision to pass
on the item (probably because he is too poor to afford it at $27) by
saying that it's not worth it anyway. This way, it makes him feel better
about not getting it.

And no, before you ask...this isn't a personal experience, but it did happen
to a friend of mine who is perplexed by this whole thing and is searching
for answers himself. He prefers to remain anonymous but would appreciate
any feedback that would help him understand this behavior.

All my years of psych in college did not prepare me for the illogic in that
final statement.

If it's not worth $10, why does he want it?

Sorry folks, but I just don't get it.

** EDIT **

Let me add that THIS is how I would have responded to the last comment.

"Then why do you want it?"
#friend #illogical #response #understand
  • Profile picture of the author ny_mariposa
    Maybe he's trying to make your friend feel like his product is worthless, thereby making him want to give it away rather than charge what it is actually worth.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanzona
    Steve, I think there's a lot of internet markleters who are just playing at it. They probably aren't even aware how illogical their response is.

    They probably just view the whole thing as a tactic to get stuff cheap or free. It could be that they've actually had a few product sellers agree to the offer, so they think it works.
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  • "Value" is entirely relative. Some IM packages that I've gladly paid hundreds of dollars for would be of much less value to my siblings, and no value at all to my grandpa. The fact that Marketer A offered $10 is solid proof that the product in question is worth at least that.

    IMHO, it sounds like Marketer A is rather immature and bitter.
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      As marketers, it is our job to build value for the client to desire the product but we sometimes forget that the prospective customer has a motive and job to do in this game we play. His job is to get the product for as little as possible and the easiest way to do that is to destroy its value. When he makes the statement "its not even worth $10" what he is trying to tell the marketer is that he is lucky that the prospect has even offered him $10 for the product. We try to tell him it is a steal at $27 while they are telling us that they feel ripped off at anything over $10.

      It is the old song and dance that has been going on for centuries at the open markets with those that feel like they have to haggle over everything.

      Tell your friend that by him sticking to his guns he may have lost a customer but the final tally is that he did not want that person as a customer anyhow since all he would do is continually haggle over the price of a product. More power to him.
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

        As marketers, it is our job to build value for the client to desire the product but we sometimes forget that the prospective customer has a motive and job to do in this game we play. His job is to get the product for as little as possible and the easiest way to do that is to destroy its value. When he makes the statement "its not even worth $10" what he is trying to tell the marketer is that he is lucky that the prospect has even offered him $10 for the product. We try to tell him it is a steal at $27 while they are telling us that they feel ripped off at anything over $10.

        It is the old song and dance that has been going on for centuries at the open markets with those that feel like they have to haggle over everything.

        Tell your friend that by him sticking to his guns he may have lost a customer but the final tally is that he did not want that person as a customer anyhow since all he would do is continually haggle over the price of a product. More power to him.

        See, I understand the haggling. I get that all the time. What I don't
        understand is the last statement. That's something that I personally have
        never run into. Nobody's ever told me that my product isn't even worth
        what they offered for it. In fact, most of these people usually end up
        buying it for the full price anyway because they know it's probably worth
        more than that.

        It's just the statement that baffles me. As somebody pointed out above,
        it's almost childish...like marketer A was a young kid.

        Maybe this is why I didn't get into psychology after college and why I
        can't for the life of me understand why my daughter is not only a psych
        major but going for her master's degree in it as well.

        Just boggles my mind. I mean who in their right mind would try to
        understand human behavior unless they absolutely had to?
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        • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
          Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

          See, I understand the haggling. I get that all the time. What I don't
          understand is the last statement. That's something that I personally have
          never run into. Nobody's ever told me that my product isn't even worth
          what they offered for it. In fact, most of these people usually end up
          buying it for the full price anyway because they know it's probably worth
          more than that.

          It's just the statement that baffles me. As somebody pointed out above,
          it's almost childish...like marketer A was a young kid.

          Maybe this is why I didn't get into psychology after college and why I
          can't for the life of me understand why my daughter is not only a psych
          major but going for her master's degree in it as well.

          Just boggles my mind. I mean who in their right mind would try to
          understand human behavior unless they absolutely had to?
          It is not necessarily that they are childish but just as one other poster put it, they may come from a country where that type of haggling is routine. I have had many dealings with Middle Eastern as well as Asian cultures where if you do not haggle and in the proper form then it is an insult. Your friend may not understand the culture or the other person may not realize that we are a more literal culture here. Then again, the haggler could just be an a-hole and only wants to get something for nothing.

          Without knowing both parties it is difficult to pin down an exact reason for the comments made. Everything you are getting here is all pure supposition and guessing.

          I still salute him for holding his ground.
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        • Profile picture of the author AnneE
          Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

          Maybe this is why I didn't get into psychology after college and why I can't for the life of me understand why my daughter is not only a psych
          major but going for her master's degree in it as well.
          Generally I've found most people who study advance psychology hope to help other people from being their own worst enemy. Or phrased more positively, they want to help others reach their potential.

          Does that fit your daughter?
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          • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
            Originally Posted by AnneE View Post

            Generally I've found most people who study advance psychology hope to help other people from being their own worst enemy. Or phrased more positively, they want to help others reach their potential.

            Does that fit your daughter?
            My daughter loves helping people.

            I told her she should become an Internet marketer.

            All kidding aside, she's a born head shrink. If she wasn't so against med
            school she'd make a great psychiatrist.
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            • Profile picture of the author Geode
              Lets not forget some people are just F**** weird. You'll never understand what they mean or what they want.
              Kev.:confused:
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  • Profile picture of the author R Hagel
    Hi Steve,


    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    If it's not even worth the $10, why does marketer A want it?
    Your friend is assuming that everything coming out of Marketer A's mouth is truthful.

    If we take that particular assumption away, then I can see where Marketer A's statement makes sense. If he's broke but he wants the product, then he's going to "haggle" and negotiate with Marketer B. Part of that haggling is to make the product seem less valuable.

    It's like buying a used car. People often point out all the little things that are wrong with the car in order to help justify their lower offer. It doesn't mean they don't WANT the car -- they do. They just want it at a LOWER price.

    (Then the car dealer comes back with reasons why the car is worth the price in order to justify his higher price. And they go back and forth.)

    So, perhaps Marketer A was trying to do something similar. He wants the product but he was trying to haggle down a lower price.

    Cheers,
    Becky
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by R Hagel View Post

      Hi Steve,




      Your friend is assuming that everything coming out of Marketer A's mouth is truthful.

      If we take that particular assumption away, then I can see where Marketer A's statement makes sense. If he's broke but he wants the product, then he's going to "haggle" and negotiate with Marketer B. Part of that haggling is to make the product seem less valuable.

      It's like buying a used car. People often point out all the little things that are wrong with the car in order to help justify their lower offer. It doesn't mean they don't WANT the car -- they do. They just want it at a LOWER price.

      (Then the car dealer comes back with reasons why the car is worth the price in order to justify his higher price. And they go back and forth.)

      So, perhaps Marketer A was trying to do something similar. He wants the product but he was trying to haggle down a lower price.

      Cheers,
      Becky

      Thank you Becky. I had a feeling that I was over analyzing this and not
      looking at what was right in front of my face.

      Makes a lot of sense what you said.

      May I pass this on to my friend?

      Better yet, maybe I'll just send him the link to this thread.
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      • Profile picture of the author R Hagel
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        May I pass this on to my friend?
        Of course.

        Better yet, maybe I'll just send him the link to this thread.
        Perfect.

        cheers,
        Becky

        p.s. Of course that's not necessarily the only explanation. But I do think Marketer A wants the product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
      I think R Hagel has a good answer.

      But, another might be this...

      Both are marketers, right? And, I am guessing that the product is a digital product.

      It is common for marketers to sell digital products and have an affiliate program offering a 75% commission. That means the marketer is willing to accept 25% of the price to get the sale.

      On a $27 product, 25% is $6.75. So, marketer A may think that the value of marketer B's product is really $6.75. So, he offers $10, which, in his mind, is a good deal, because it is lower than the regular $27 price while higher than what marketer B might normally for a sale of the product. It's a win-win.

      So, when marketer A says the product is not worth $10, he's not necessarily being insulting; it's just that he really thinks the product is worth $6.75.

      It could be that marketer B does not offer any kind of affiliate program and marketer B could have priced the product at $27 because that's the lowest price he is willing to accept for it. But, that's marketer B's mentality, and what we're looking at here is marketer A's mentality.

      And, marketer A's mentality may be that digital products are really worth 25% of the asking price, simply because it's so common to do the 25/75 split on affiliate programs with digital products.
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

        I think R Hagel has a good answer.

        But, another might be this...

        Both are marketers, right? And, I am guessing that the product is a digital product.

        It is common for marketers to sell digital products and have an affiliate program offering a 75% commission. That means the marketer is willing to accept 25% of the price to get the sale.

        On a $27 product, 25% is $6.75. So, marketer A may think that the value of marketer B's product is really $6.75. So, he offers $10, which, in his mind, is a good deal, because it is lower than the regular $27 price while higher than what marketer B might normally for a sale of the product. It's a win-win.

        So, when marketer A says the product is not worth $10, he's not necessarily being insulting; it's just that he really thinks the product is worth $6.75.

        It could be that marketer B does not offer any kind of affiliate program and marketer B could have priced the product at $27 because that's the lowest price he is willing to accept for it. But, that's marketer B's mentality, and what we're looking at here is marketer A's mentality.

        And, marketer A's mentality may be that digital products are really worth 25% of the asking price, simply because it's so common to do the 25/75 split on affiliate programs with digital products.

        Thanks Dan. This is another good point and something I didn't consider
        either.

        Keep them coming folks. I think this will be a good education for a lot of
        product creators when approached with low ball offers.
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    • Profile picture of the author jestershaw
      As always Becky, you gave another awesome answer. I am begining to really like you, in a platonic Warrior kind of way of course!

      Originally Posted by R Hagel View Post

      Hi Steve,




      Your friend is assuming that everything coming out of Marketer A's mouth is truthful.

      If we take that particular assumption away, then I can see where Marketer A's statement makes sense. If he's broke but he wants the product, then he's going to "haggle" and negotiate with Marketer B. Part of that haggling is to make the product seem less valuable.

      It's like buying a used car. People often point out all the little things that are wrong with the car in order to help justify their lower offer. It doesn't mean they don't WANT the car -- they do. They just want it at a LOWER price.

      (Then the car dealer comes back with reasons why the car is worth the price in order to justify his higher price. And they go back and forth.)

      So, perhaps Marketer A was trying to do something similar. He wants the product but he was trying to haggle down a lower price.

      Cheers,
      Becky
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        Originally Posted by jestershaw View Post

        As always Becky, you gave another awesome answer. I am begining to really like you, in a platonic Warrior kind of way of course!
        Becky is without a doubt one of the brightest members of this forum.

        Nough said.
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Please note the following conversation and see if you can pick out the illogic in it.
    It's a standard negotiation tactic, common in the Middle East. Seller grossly exaggerates the value of the product to keep the price high; buyer grossly exaggerates the worthlessness of the product to drive the price down.

    No statements made about the product are expected to be true. Marketer A might claim to have been left the product in his grandfather's will as a child, and Marketer B might claim that it is only out of sorrow at the death of Marketer A's grandfather that he is offering to buy this worthless trivia at all.

    In general, you seesaw back and forth around the desired price, (A+B)/2, until someone finally accepts an offer... usually with much wailing and gnashing of teeth about how painful it is agreeing to such an unfair exchange.
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  • Profile picture of the author Clark
    I do believe the haggler really values the product yet wants to feel good about negotiating a deal to get it at a reduced price - double win for the consumer and also, widely accepted consumer behaviour in many cultures globally.

    Personally, I would sell the buyer 30% of the product for the 10 bucks.

    When the buyer complains, I'll tell him that I sold him the part that was worth the 10 bucks to him, just as he stated when he said, "Please, it's not even worth the $10" then agree that it isn't worth the $10, it's worth $27 for the whole product.

    Full refund and a blacklisting to follow.

    The buyer may not ever learn a lesson here but it sure would be fun to mess with their mind in the process instead of getting bent about it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Shaka
    [QUOTE=Steven Wagenheim;954429]Please note the following conversation and see if you can pick out the
    illogic in it.

    Marketer A - How much is the product?

    Marketer B - $27

    Marketer A - I'll give you $10 for it.

    Marketer B - Sorry but it's $27. No discounts.

    Marketer A - Please, it's not even worth the $10.


    First off, if he does not have the product he cannot know its value. Secondly there will always be bargain hunters who, usually because of previous successes, will try to bargain everyone down. I don't pay much attention to them nor do I care about their motives or mindset. If they want to bargain then let them buy a house or a car. For most other products the price is on the label.
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Stamper
    It could just be a negotiation ploy. By saying it's not worth $10 he's trying to devalue the product. For all you know, Marketer A is filthy rich.

    When I went shopping with my son for his first car (a used one), I didn't go driving around in my BMW. Instead we took my old pickup truck.

    When looking at cars I would point out every nick and ding in the car. The car we finally bought the seller was trying to sell for $4,500. I wound up paying $3,200 even though I probably told the seller it wasn't worth $3,200 at some point.

    When Microsoft buys domain names for their new products, they don't tell the current domain owner that Microsoft wants the domain name. Instead they use a lawyer that says "My client is interested in your domain name".

    As an example, when Microsoft launched Slate.com, the had to buy the domain name from a guy named Bill Slate. Of course they didn't go in to negotiations saying Bill Gates wants to buy your domain. In the end they paid $3,000 and I'm sure at some point they said it wasn't worth that amount.
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Ames
    Good question. I'm often amused and perplexed by people. I can only guess at the motivation. I suspect that if he sold it for $10 that a refund request would come shortly thereafter.

    I bent over backwards once to accommodate someone that begged me to take the form of payment they preferred, sold the product, and had a refund request the next day. Never again.. these are my terms and payments accepted, take it or leave it.
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Originally Posted by Scott Ames View Post

      Good question. I'm often amused and perplexed by people. I can only guess at the motivation. I suspect that if he sold it for $10 that a refund request would come shortly thereafter.

      I bent over backwards once to accommodate someone that begged me to take the form of payment they preferred, sold the product, and had a refund request the next day. Never again.. these are my terms and payments accepted, take it or leave it.
      That line of thinking can backfire on you. For example, you might have the best thing since sliced bread and it might be worth $100 million but you are letting it go for $0.01 and if all you are taking is Paypal, then I am sorry but you wont see my $0.01 come your way. Many individuals are getting screwed by Paypal and e-bay and they are getting fed up and leaving them. You need to be flexible or you could paint yourself into a corner you cant get out of.
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  • Profile picture of the author Keith Kogane
    Either you need something to solve a problem at hand, or you don't. If it's not a hard solution to a current painful problem, you're really selling to a WANT rather than a NEED. And once you get into "want" territory, all logic goes right out the window.

    You're dealing with a much more primitive sensory interpretation apparatus. That may be why it seemed like a "childish" response to you, only because children often don't have very good logic skills either.

    I also think there's a seed of truth in what you said about rationalization on the part of the buyer too.

    But then again, everything everyone else said is true too. I know lots of consumer advocate sites are trying to get westerners more warm to the idea of haggling for EVERYTHING as the economy continues to stagnate.

    The same way that the OP assumes that all vendors will price products for the minumum they will accept (like he does), it could just be that the buyer assumes all vendors are charging MORE than the product is really worth (possibly like he/she does, or has encountered before).

    Anyway, my $0.02 for what it's worth. But I'll let you have it for $10.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Anderson
    all this discussion is very interesting to me.
    you see, i am completely baffeled by the negotiating mentality.
    why would i set a price if i didn't want that price?
    and yet i am told that it is an insult not to negotiate in some cultures.

    now for my point.
    i was doing ok offline. i had/have a 12 year old business making upmarket hammocks.
    but i was mostly marketing them on the flea markets, and people presume that all flea market products are negotiable.
    not mine.
    so when i finally got the urge to strangle a customer, i realised that it was time to move on.
    safer for all of you online. :+)
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  • Profile picture of the author AnneE
    I think everyone wants to be the person doing the rejection.

    Rather than trying to understand the above exchange, compare it to the conversation below with boy calls EX-girlfriend.

    Boy: I saw you at the pizza place with your friends. You looked kind of sad. You know I've been thinking maybe we should get back together, both of us are miserable apart.

    Girl: I looked sad because I think I flunked my history final. I'm sorry but I'm not interested in getting back together.

    Boy: YEAH! Well neither am I. I just said that about being miserable apart and wanting to get back together because I felt sorry for you. I've never been so happy in my life. CLICK!

    ---------------
    Now listen for the same pattern:

    Marketer A: I saw your WSO and thought maybe I'd offer you $10 for it.

    Marketer B: Sorry, the price is $27 firm.

    Marketer A: Yeah.... well it's a lousy product and not even worth $10 anyway!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jared Alberghini
    Mr. Spock would not approve of Marketer A

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    • Profile picture of the author affilcrazy
      I tend to agree with Becky in parts...however, i think there is a helluva lot of over analysis going on here!

      Marketer A = Spoilt/Immature

      When certain people don't get what they want, they tend to throw their toys out of the pram!

      Yes, Marketer A definitely wants the product, but doesn't wish to pay the full price (or for some reason believes they shouldn't have to pay the full price). Their offer gets rejected and immediately the barriers come up!

      Cheers
      Partha
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      • Profile picture of the author CaseWhitney
        This exchange is classic for negotiating non tangible goods.

        Reminds me of this great video that plays out the same negotiation on traditional physical goods.

        Has me rolling every time I see it:
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        Steven,

        The illogic is not in the attempted manipulation, which has been explained. It's in the determination of value before experiencing the product.

        How can Marketer A possibly make a statement like that and expect iot to be taken seriously? And how can Marketer B logically be expected to be manipulated by such a nonsensical comment?

        Answer: Both parties are acting out of ego, rather than logic. It's not a discussion. It's a game. And yes, that's the same as the haggling rituals in some countries, but they only use the ego-oriented stuff as the surface, where Americans tend to take it seriously.

        Mind you, this isn't meant to contradict any other answers here. It's a specific response to the emphasis on logic in the original question.


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      • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
        Originally Posted by affilcrazy View Post

        When certain people don't get what they want, they tend to throw their toys out of the pram!
        Now there's a term I have not heard in ages!! It makes me homesick, it does. Oh the memories.

        The days when Cheerio was a greeting and not a breakfast cereal. When bobbies walked the streets twirling their nightsticks and everyone used the lift to get to the 10th floor. Those were the days when you could light up a fag and not go to jail for a hate crime. Everyone knew if the Queen mum was in the palace just by looking at the flag pole.

        Many thanks to you, mate. You brought back some good times to this heart of mine.
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  • Profile picture of the author nathaliestyles
    Originally Posted by Rob Anderson

    all this discussion is very interesting to me.
    you see, i am completely baffeled by the negotiating mentality.
    why would i set a price if i didn't want that price?
    and yet i am told that it is an insult not to negotiate in some cultures.

    now for my point.
    i was doing ok offline. i had/have a 12 year old business making upmarket hammocks.
    but i was mostly marketing them on the flea markets, and people presume that all flea market products are negotiable.
    not mine.
    so when i finally got the urge to strangle a customer, i realised that it was time to move on.
    safer for all of you online. :+)


    I completely agree with Rob on the mindset to try and haggle down a set price. I understand that in certain situations it is common, but if by chance you may think that all situations are negotiable then by all means negotiate with some respect of myself and my business and I'm sure they would want. Ask me for a deal or what I can save you, include me in the fact that your really interested but you just are not able to swing that price. Let me understand but at the same time keep your credit, you get more fly's with honey then you do with vinegar. Next time you may just get that discount, if not no one is going to waste their time with a bigger pain then worth customer.
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  • Profile picture of the author artwebster
    Marketer A - Please, it's not even worth the $10.

    Translation - I was interested in buying your product and I had reservations about the price. Unfortunately your objection handling skills are so poor that you have failed to spot a chance to 'win' a sale.

    Maybe if Marketer 'B' had said something like - "It's interesting that you think that way and I would like to explore that possibility. Tell me, why do you think it is not worth $10?"

    Sometimes "Because that's the price" just isn't enough.
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  • Profile picture of the author peterzhang
    Here is my opinion:

    Marketer B want to get this product at a price as low as possible, but he is not sure which is the reasonable price because he thought it will not worth $27 as Marketer A said. So he tried to make the price as low as possible, then Marketer A will try to make the price higher than $10, maybe 12, 14 or 15, who knows. A price that are higher than $10 and the cost price at the same time. But if the Marketer B said it worth $20, it will be impossible for Marketer A to sell this product to Marketer B at a price lower than $20 because according to our business experience, Marketer A will add the price and make it higher than $20. So, according to my opinion, Marketer B acts like this because he do not know a lot about the price of the product and he wants to make the starting point as low as possible.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
      Obviously Marketer A has no negotiation skills. By saying "It's not even worth $10" he instantly puts Marketer B on the defensive and the negotiations are off.

      Myself, if I wanted to get it for $10, would use a more diplomatic approach: "I can see where your product is worth $27, and I fully understand if you can't sell it to me for a lower price. However, since I only need Section B, could you see fit to let me pay you $10 for the product. In return, if the product lives up to its promise, I'll give you some honest feedback which you can use as a testimonial."

      Now, Marketer B is far more likely to be amenable to the offer.

      EDIT: I should add, that I'm still not willing to pay even $10 for just one of the set of photos of Steve playing on a bearskin rug - in the nude.
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      • Profile picture of the author rapidscc
        Originally Posted by Kevin Riley View Post

        Obviously Marketer A has no negotiation skills. By saying "It's not even worth $10" he instantly puts Marketer B on the defensive and the negotiations are off.

        Myself, if I wanted to get it for $10, would use a more diplomatic approach: "I can see where your product is worth $27, and I fully understand if you can't sell it to me for a lower price. However, since I only need Section B, could you see fit to let me pay you $10 for the product. In return, if the product lives up to its promise, I'll give you some honest feedback which you can use as a testimonial."

        Now, Marketer B is far more likely to be amenable to the offer.

        EDIT: I should add, that I'm still not willing to pay even $10 for just one of the set of photos of Steve playing on a bearskin rug - in the nude.
        Maybe it's not the negotiation skills. I've heard a lot of IMers being duped with BS products..So maybe this marketer got burned pretty much that he/she's now pessimistic about new products, this shows in the way he deals with fellow marketers..

        As for marketer B he should have assured marketer A money back guarantee if the product did not deliver..even extend it to 60, 90 or even a year just to show goodwill and belief in his own product.

        As for seeing a photo of Steve in the nude for $10 dollars--arrrghh scary thought...really scary..

        oMar
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      • Profile picture of the author ikontent
        Originally Posted by Kevin Riley View Post

        EDIT: I should add, that I'm still not willing to pay even $10 for just one of the set of photos of Steve playing on a bearskin rug - in the nude.
        Kevin

        Steve should pay YOU $10 for the privilege of accepting one set of photos...
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        When I have something good to say, you'll see it here first.
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  • Profile picture of the author Black Hat Cat
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Please note the following conversation and see if you can pick out the
    illogic in it.

    Marketer A - How much is the product?

    Marketer B - $27

    Marketer A - I'll give you $10 for it.

    Marketer B - Sorry but it's $27. No discounts.

    Marketer A - Please, it's not even worth the $10.

    Okay, this is where I will stop.

    If it's not even worth the $10, why does marketer A want it?

    I am trying to understand the mindset of people who reply back with
    comments like that.

    Here is my theory. Please feel free to give me yours because I do not in
    any way claim to know the answer to this.

    My theory is that the person is trying to rationalize his decision to pass
    on the item (probably because he is too poor to afford it at $27) by
    saying that it's not worth it anyway. This way, it makes him feel better
    about not getting it.

    And no, before you ask...this isn't a personal experience, but it did happen
    to a friend of mine who is perplexed by this whole thing and is searching
    for answers himself. He prefers to remain anonymous but would appreciate
    any feedback that would help him understand this behavior.

    All my years of psych in college did not prepare me for the illogic in that
    final statement.

    If it's not worth $10, why does he want it?

    Sorry folks, but I just don't get it.

    ** EDIT **

    Let me add that THIS is how I would have responded to the last comment.

    "Then why do you want it?"
    Wow, some people REALLY have too much time on their hands.
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  • Profile picture of the author astaga
    Here's how I see it:
    Altho "negotiation" tactics may have been in A's mind when this scenario played out, it certainly wasn't in B's mind. So there's a disconnect there (like how can two tango when both are on different wavelengths?) I believe A "wants" the product, but his approach/mentality leaves much to be desired.

    I believe there needs to be awareness of following:
    a) price
    b) value
    c) benefit

    Price = a monetary number put on a product.
    Value = is in the eye of the beholder, just like in beauty.
    Benefit = ?, well that depends upon what a purchaser does with the product/service.

    It is hard to judge or put a "value" in any product/service without actually trying or experiencing it, so the "Please, it's not even worth the $10" argument goes out the window, it's ILLogical and I interpret that to mean A "wants" the product but isn't really a serious "qualified" customer (meaning he doesn't really need it, else...)

    OR worse, if it really could be useful to him, he desires to get it, but the asking price (= assigned monetary value) is not worth his risk (if there is no guarantee) OR investment (if a guarantee is available), SO I'm thinking, OMG, I see that as a reflection of how much A actually assigns value/worth to himself, because ultimately it's a measure of self value.

    Finally benefits comes when a purchaser puts the product or service to use, deriving something worthwhile which would otherwise not materialize or which would, if left to oneself, take far longer to achieve. Value of that? Well depends on the recipient of the product or service.

    Using this, I've been able to understand why someone like say, Jay Abraham, would be able to command $50k for a consultation. You and like may balk at the fee, but to the customer, it's worth every cent because the value they get (savings/earnings/profits in potential monetary value) far outweighs the investment put in for these clients.... Or why some WSOs or packages could be worth FAR MORE value than what it is priced at (because the benefits/savings far outweigh the costs, etc...). Of course there are the "investment" we buy that bombed out, but I take that to be part of the learning curve.... etc...

    A believes in his product/service and know it's worth, A should stand by it. Of course there is no hard and fast rules, or right and wrong, but who is to say what something should be priced at? Only the buyer. If it's not "worth" the $10, then B should move on.... (I mean that in a nice way).

    Hope that means sense.
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  • Profile picture of the author PeteHarrison
    Hi Steve,

    You've obviously never haggled in a Marakesh souk

    Pete
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  • Profile picture of the author macD231
    This kind of bargaining process to me so that seller might reduce the price though it doesn't work always. But yes the last line of MR A is meaning less if it really didn't worth $10 then why should he ask for 10. My guess Mr A might like the product though it didn't worth but still he wanted to pay $10.
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  • Profile picture of the author ahlexis
    Here's something to think about.

    Sometimes the "logic" has to do with where the person is from and the economic environment they grew up in, etc.

    Here's an example I found useful in trying to understand people.

    My daughter's best friend was born and grew up in Poland. She is in the US (legally) and is struggling to understand some of the people around her. She has told both me and my daughter that in other places in the world you don't haggle, the price is just the price, and that's that...take it or leave it. It's just how the world according to the people she grew up around just IS.

    Meanwhile, my husband has been around Asian people who negotiate for everything. I'm not saying that all Asian people are determined to negotiate, but what he has found is that the Asian people he has been around are more used to the negotiating and price their merchandise accordingly, leaving room to haggle. This haggling is expected.

    Maybe the person your friend is dealing with is expecting to haggle, and is therefore suffering a kind of culture shock that the seller is not flexible. Their issue isn't so much that they don't want to pay the initial price so much as it is that they do not want to give the first price because they feel it is showing a weakness, and they are so determined not to be visibly weak that they feel better off not having what they wanted to buy than if they just paid the initial asking price and let the seller (your friend) "beat them" out of the full asking price. (Hope that makes sense, I really do!) I mean, think about it. When you have negotiated a really good deal, don't you brag about it to one of your friends every now and then? If he would have succeeded in getting the item for the lower price it probably would have been one of those grandiose stories he told at the next party about how he "got it for less than half price" or something.

    (I have a few of those stories myself, including one where I got a $150 piece of exercise equipment for $10 because it was the last one, the display model, and my husband cracked his standard "I'll give you ten dollars for it" smirk without a smile. To our astonishment the manager eventually came over and said "okay, as long as you promise not to return it.")

    My point is, this might have to do with a regional difference (since this is the internet, etc., etc.) more so than an illogical situation. It could be that it is just an extreme example of what is expected in the culture that the person grew up in. But in the heat of the "art of the deal", it's possible that this person who wants to haggle does not know how to be tactful in what they see as "the negotiation" and are just frustratingly attempting to intimidate the seller (your friend) into giving in by their demeaning the product they think they are negotiating to buy.

    By the way, your friend should stick to his/her guns! If the product is worth what they are asking then the person haggling with them is not the target market he/she is shooting for. Not every person who takes a serious look at the product for sale is a potential customer, even though they may appear to be.
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  • Profile picture of the author ContentIn48Hours
    It might also have to do with the fact that the person is too embarrassed to just say "I don't have enough money".

    As we all know as marketers the goal is to make money, to not have money could easily be viewed as a failure to himself and other marketers.

    I've been poor before and it's not fun. Most people without money are too proud to say that. Just my .02.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author projek001
    I know, he's trying to get the product in a cheap price. So that he can use the other 17 to buy something else.
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    PM me or ask me via Yahoo Messenger (my id:saifulbest) for more info about this crazy deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author embrown
    Also he may think that Marketer B will settle for anything just to get a sale. I was in a bind a few months ago and had to sell my car. I wanted $X,XXX or best offer. You wouldn't believe the offers I got! I wasn't totally desperate!
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Anybody who would haggle over $27.00 isn't qualified to say what is valuable or not, because nothing is working for them!
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  • Profile picture of the author Gene O
    I think this is being over analyzed.

    Seems like he just wanted to get it cheaper. Then when his offer was rejected, he got defensive and then tried to better the situation IN HIS MIND with the "It's not worth it" comment.

    Either way, clearly he wanted the product.

    I would recommend reading the book "How To Sell At Prices Higher Than Your Competitors". It deals with this type of thing.
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