Niche site - US or UK spellings

12 replies
Hi everyone.

I'm about to build a new niche site, and am confused on which spelling I should be using.

The US word varies slightly to the UK word, in the same way that colour & color do.

I have found a decent .com domain available which is the UK spelling - Should I build the site and target purely UK users? Is it even going to make a difference?

Thanks,

Alex
#niche #site #spellings
  • Profile picture of the author spondoolies
    what i am lead to believe is that a
    the domain isnt quite as important anymore? its more about the content and how brandable the site is?

    please call me on it if im wrong :p its the only way ill learn
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702842].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author alexandersmith
    I believe it's true about the domain not holding as much weight as it used to, but I'm also interested in the content within the website, whether I should target the US or UK version of the word.

    For instance, if I purchase the domain with the UK spelling in, I can't really see it being relevant to use the US spelling throughout the site.

    Alex
    Signature

    Professional Copywriter Available For Hire.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702853].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
      What is your target audience? Gear your website to your target audience.

      Other than that, I would say retain your own identity, in the long run it will give you much more credibility. I'm English, but I've lived in the US for many years, I read the British papers online most days and I often see British people castigating various papers' writers for using American terminology and spelling. As they point out - when they read a British paper, they expect it to represent itself as British.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702887].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Zak L.
    I can't really say much because I don't know what the niche is or what audience you're targeting.

    But make sure that when you pick a domain name - you take in to account the different spelling variations Alex :-)
    Signature





    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702888].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author alexandersmith
    Without revealing the exact niche, it's a popular product that I Plan on creating a review site around around. I will then use affiliate programs and or Amazon affiliate to promote the product.

    I'm just unsure whether I should target purely the UK market with the UK spelling, or use the US spelling and go worldwide!

    Thanks,

    Alex
    Signature

    Professional Copywriter Available For Hire.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702901].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by alexandersmith View Post

      I'm just unsure whether I should target purely the UK market with the UK spelling, or use the US spelling and go worldwide!
      The web is worldwide. If you're not, you're imposing a huge limitation on your business.

      Some niches are, by their very nature, more or less specifically UK-centric. But if this one isn't, the proportion of its market that's "UK" must be fairly small?

      There must be a way to combine the two, surely? You can always register two domain-names?

      It's undeniably true that US/UK spellings can alienate potential customers from the UK/US.

      Originally Posted by alexandersmith View Post

      it's a popular product that I Plan on creating a review site around around.
      Call me "interfering", but I worry about, you Alex.

      I see two potential causes for concern, there ...

      (i) For affiliate marketing purposes, review sites are hardly - to put it very mildly - an "optimal plan", in 2014/5.

      (ii) If it's already such a popular product, doesn't that ensure that you'll be competing for the same traffic as countless other more experienced, more successful, better-funded marketers and that perhaps the majority of your visitors will comprise people already subscribed to their mailing-lists who will already be well aware of the product? Might this not perhaps be starting off under a further, (unnecessary?) handicap??

      .
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702931].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author alexandersmith
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        The web is worldwide. If you're not, you're imposing a huge limitation on your business.

        Some niches are, by their very nature, more or less specifically UK-centric. But if this one isn't, the proportion of its market that's "UK" must be fairly small?

        There must be a way to combine the two, surely? You can always register two domain-names?

        It's undeniably true that US/UK spellings can alienate potential customers from the UK/US.



        Call me "interfering", but I worry about, you Alex.

        I see two potential causes for concern, there ...

        (i) For affiliate marketing purposes, review sites are hardly - to put it very mildly - an "optimal plan", in 2014/5.

        (ii) If it's already such a popular product, doesn't that ensure that you'll be competing for the same traffic as countless other more experienced, more successful, better-funded marketers and that perhaps the majority of your visitors will comprise people already subscribed to their mailing-lists who will already be well aware of the product? Might this not perhaps be starting off under a further, (unnecessary?) handicap??

        .
        Thanks for the advice - What would you consider a more optimal plan in these times? I'm not expecting to get rich quick, and I'm more than willing to put the time and effort into constructing well written and honest reviews, which I thought would be a benefit in today's market, considering much of the affiliate review type sites currently ranking well are filled with spammy SEO rubbish..

        Thanks
        Signature

        Professional Copywriter Available For Hire.

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9703031].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author aire
    Use the good old American spelling!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9702941].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DianaLensbury
    Hey Alex,

    I've set up several online ventures where I started out targeting the UK because I'm British and I know that I can hit their emotional buttons better by using English terms that they can relate to. You can definitely have an edge marketing to your home market.

    When I've expanded to the US, a market which is something like 6x the size, I immediately notice the increased competition, which does make it harder. Some of this can be offset by the increased responsiveness of US consumers.
    The US is also less seasonal than the UK. For example, you could market lawn care products all year round to the US because of the sheer size of the country and diversity of climates.
    The best bit of all is, due to the time difference, waking up to money you earned while you slept.

    I find to this day that '.co.uk' domains will give you a definite advantage in UK search engines.


    Just a couple of tips to help you make a decision.

    ~Diana
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9703010].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author alexandersmith
      Originally Posted by DianaLensbury View Post

      Hey Alex,

      I've set up several online ventures where I started out targeting the UK because I'm British and I know that I can hit their emotional buttons better by using English terms that they can relate to. You can definitely have an edge marketing to your home market.

      When I've expanded to the US, a market which is something like 6x the size, I immediately notice the increased competition, which does make it harder. Some of this can be offset by the increased responsiveness of US consumers.
      The US is also less seasonal than the UK. For example, you could market lawn care products all year round to the US because of the sheer size of the country and diversity of climates.
      The best bit of all is, due to the time difference, waking up to money you earned while you slept.

      I find to this day that '.co.uk' domains will give you a definite advantage in UK search engines.


      Just a couple of tips to help you make a decision.

      ~Diana
      Thanks Diana, you make some pretty interesting points regarding the seasonal selling of certain products. I think I'm going to begin by using a .co.uk name and targeting the UK market - There's still 70 odd million people here in the UK, so I figure a small chunk of that will be enough to start with

      Alex
      Signature

      Professional Copywriter Available For Hire.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9703033].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Altered State
    I wouldn't go for a confusing name like that if I could not buy both domains.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9703041].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author spearce000
    Quite honestly, it doesn't make a lot of difference. I've lived, worked, been educated in, and market to both the UK and US. Every so often you'll find someone who takes exception, but most people couldn't care less in my experience. Besides, most English speaking countries were once part of the British Empire anyway, and use British English in their everyday communications. - the US being the notable exception.

    As long as you can make yourself understood, and don't sound like you're illiterate, you shouldn't have any problems.
    Signature
    WordPress Security Clampdown – was just for the War Room, now available to all Warriors. Protect your WordPress site from hackers. No opt-in required.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9703369].message }}

Trending Topics