Do you look at the bigger picture or the little one?

13 replies
I'm interested in your approach to internet marketing - I always feel like I've taken a different one by looking at the smaller picture but I'm interested to whether any of you guys think the same.

Basically when I first started out I had the theory that if I just made $1 (£1 here in the UK) per hour I'd make $672 per month, then from there I'd just scale it.

So for example if I wanted to make $100 in a day, rather than focusing on the $100 and struggling I'd find a way to make ~$4.16 in an hour & then simply repeat it 24 times.

Anybody else take this approach or is it just me?
#bigger #picture
  • Profile picture of the author eaw44f
    I focus on getting better at something every single day. For example say I want to make 100 per day. I would first focus on achieving 20 a day, 50, 75 until I get to that point.
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  • Profile picture of the author seoboyz01
    The key to making a full time income online is to focus on building a business, one customer at a time. When you have one happy customer, that turns into a repeat customer, so long as that person is signed up to your email list. For me, this is the big and little picture.
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  • Profile picture of the author BernardR
    I guess if you understand how to make $1 online then it is no different to make $1000.

    For me I am interested in making large amounts of money and do not focus low paying campaigns.
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    • Profile picture of the author kilgore
      I don't think it matters how you slice it: $1/hour, $24/day, $168/month, $365/day or $384 during a Chinese leap year -- I think you're focusing on the wrong thing.

      Money is important -- but especially in the beginning, it's a really bad indicator of how well you're doing. Making money takes sustained success over a long period of time and important actions you take today might not pay off financially for months. Building a successful business is necessarily an exercise in delayed gratification, so if you're always focused on your short-term balance sheet, you'll likely miss opportunities and misjudge your progress.

      Making money is also dependent on doing the complete package correctly: product, traffic, sales, branding, etc. Even if you do everything else perfectly, if you do just one of these things wrong -- if, for instance, you have beautiful sales copy, and a fantastic product, but no traffic -- you won't see any money. But in the previous example, you wouldn't want to give up or throw out your beautiful sales copy just because you aren't making money. You'd want to get more traffic!

      Finally, putting the focus on your profit puts the emphasis on your goals -- when what you should really be focusing on are the goals, needs and demands of your customers. And if you're not focused on your customers, you had better believe that your competitors will be. And if your competitors do a better job serving your customers, you won't meet your goals anyway.

      So at least in the beginning, don't focus so much on the money -- it's just not a reliable indicator of early progress. Think of the money more as a side effect of achieving all your other business goals, especially the goal of providing the most value you can to your customers. If you do that effectively, the money will roll in by itself.
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  • Profile picture of the author keyuria
    I started it from allowing people to measure for what I am good at and allow them to measure me in terms of money and from there I knew what I am worth and that got me going. By that, I learned that I can get more of what I thought I could earn,
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  • Profile picture of the author JensSteyaert
    If you're just starting out then it's a good idea to focus on just making one sale a day. If you have a system that works then you can start scaling.

    So yeah that's not a bad approach at all, because if you can make £1 every day then you can make £10 next month and soon you'll be doing this full time.
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  • Profile picture of the author yakim1
    The best way is to look at the big picture. You have to know where you are going before you can figure out how to get there.

    Here is an example... You would not start a road trip if you did not know where you were going. Once you figure out where you want to go, you then figure out how to get there.

    So figure out what the big picture is for you and then plan backwards the steps it will take to get you to the ultimate big picture. The most important part is once you have your plan in place, then take the action needed to complete each step.

    I hope this has been helpful,
    Steve Yakim
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Loftis
    This may sound like one of the posts above...but those who are really doing well (making a lotta damn $$$) are those who are continuously providing VALUE VALUE VALUE. They truly care about their customers! They TRULY want to help them succeed!! So do that
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  • Profile picture of the author Miguelito203
    Originally Posted by DaleRodge View Post

    I'm interested in your approach to internet marketing - I always feel like I've taken a different one by looking at the smaller picture but I'm interested to whether any of you guys think the same.

    Basically when I first started out I had the theory that if I just made $1 (£1 here in the UK) per hour I'd make $672 per month, then from there I'd just scale it.

    So for example if I wanted to make $100 in a day, rather than focusing on the $100 and struggling I'd find a way to make ~$4.16 in an hour & then simply repeat it 24 times.

    Anybody else take this approach or is it just me?
    I don't think that there is anything wrong with your approach - starting small and building it up over time. I actually think it's the most commonsense and realistic way to approach it. I think what you may be lacking is a plan of attack or a long-term business model to get there there. That's what you need to decide on. Do you want to have a blog, have a PLR store, be a ghostwriter, publish stuff on Kindle, focus on mobile market...etc?

    This is something that you have to kind of decide for yourself (based on your interests, current skill set, income goals and stuff like that). If you don't already know what you want to do, you'll have to just try things out one by one and see what you like.

    Good luck,
    Joey
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  • Profile picture of the author O0o0O
    Unfortunately, it's not as quite as simple as doing something small and then scaling up because you still have competition and saturation of different niche markets. For example if you start small in one market you can't necessarily start start small and do another market the same way because that other one might be saturated more or have a little bit more competition. So it's important to keep an open mind and look at the big picture as well as the little picture at the same time. If you do however find something that is very scalable then do start small and then build up.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    Focus on making one sale of a decent paying product.

    Then go for one per week.

    Then one per day and so on.

    That's how I did it when I started out in business.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaleRodge
    I think you guys have took my post the wrong way, I'm not asking for advice (I'm actually full time IM and have been for a few years ever since I quit my job as an electrician) but I was just interested to see if any of you guys had the same approach as me.

    I think one of the biggest problems with newcomers to the industry is that they're focusing on the bigger picture - the end goal if you like. When I first started out I just made the aim of making £1 an hour which would generate £672 a month - £1 was a much easier goal than making £100 a day.

    From there I just scaled it up until I made £100 in a day by making ~£4 in an hour. I personally believe this is a much much easier approach but just wondered what your personal attack was and whether or not any of you guys thought the same way.

    I appreciate your input guys thank you
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Originally Posted by DaleRodge View Post

    Anybody else take this approach or is it just me?
    Just you lol .

    Don't think so hard about it. Just sell something, set a good price, and market the heck out of it. You're money will come soon. Fund the business every month with paid advertising. And while you're business is slowly growing, go and find a hobby.

    Get a girlfriend or play xbox/PS3 so that you wont think about the business 24/7. If you proceed like this, each time you check how things are online, you will be pleased with the results you are getting.

    Just sell something though and make the money. No hard thinking required.
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