Illegal? Or just immoral ClickBank listings

by Sloss
35 replies
Hello,

I have for a while now been aware of Clickbank, I have never used it on any of my sites, but I do no doubt its effectiveness.

My background is in medicine and neurology. I quickly browsed through some of the offerings on the marketplace and was shocked to see high ranking listings offering false hope and out right rubbish with regards to Cancer and Alzheimer.

Some were so bold to say that medicine will not help you and you should stop with medicine and take their products. This is very damaging, and, at worst could result in a treatable death.

These immoral listings are surely illegal by FDA (US and UK, probably elsewhere too) standards. Do people really sell lies? If any of the companies I have worked alongside would have gone against FDA regulations, it could have ended in imprisonment. How are they getting away with it?

Surely if people want to make money online via IM, then deploying a moral code of practice is essential. And schemes like these need to be acted upon.
#clickbank #illegal #immoral #listings
  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    Do people really sell lies? . . . How are they getting away with it?
    Yes, all the time. They get away with it because those who enforce the rules have much more work than they can possibly handle. If there's a buck to be made, many people have no qualms about going after it using any means necessary because they think they will never be caught.

    It's a shame, it's unethical, it's dangerous . . . and to some it's very lucrative, unfortunately!

    Steve
    Signature

    Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
    SteveBrowneDirect

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841456].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      But - if you have a problem with products sold on Clickbank....why not tell Clickbank? People here may well agree with you but we don't control what is sold on Clickbank.
      Signature
      Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog
      ***
      It actually doesn't take much to be considered a 'difficult woman' -
      that's why there are so many of us.
      ...jane goodall
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841465].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    These immoral listings are surely illegal by FDA (US and UK, probably elsewhere too) standards.
    I'm not a lawyer, but I don't doubt that you're right, in some cases.

    My impression is that ClickBank are working, at the moment, on "cleaning up their act" in this regard. There have certainly been some big improvements, and equally certainly there are still some "anomalies" and there's a way to go.

    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    Some were so bold to say that medicine will not help you and you should stop with medicine and take their products.
    That's absolutely appalling, if so. I don't remember seeing any of those for quite a while. I do complain about those, when I see them. And not only to ClickBank.

    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    Do people really sell lies?
    Some do.

    Many of us, of course, run a mile from products with sales pages of the type you mention.

    For myself, I have a couple of MD's in my close family and I don't promote "health"/"medical" products unless they both approve of the actual product and its sales page, and that does exclude quite a bit, I admit.

    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    If any of the companies I have worked alongside would have gone against FDA regulations, it could have ended in imprisonment. How are they getting away with it?
    I suspect partly by having such a widely acknowledged reputation for honoring their money-back refund guarantee without question, and partly because many of the things you're talking about are "gray areas" which - in reality - get few complaints. The fact that the vendors of those products happen to be using ClickBank as their payment processor doesn't necessarily attach much blame to ClickBank, perhaps, too? And then there's the fact that the regulatory mills grind exceedingly slowly, to take into account, as well, perhaps? And the fact that the products typically contain appropriately worded legal disclaimers?

    I also suspect that, these days, there are actually comparatively few clearcut cases of the type to which you refer on ClickBank, anyway, though I agree entirely that a few of them are very concerning.


    .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841582].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author mlpauling
      Unfortunately there are unscrupulous people in every industry, especially marketing. But being in medicine I know you are aware of this.

      Look at all the pills being pushed on the public with little or no proof of their effectiveness and their laundry list of side effects (including death.) Three months after one of these wonder drugs is released there is a law commercial asking "have you or someone you know taken XXXX then you may be entitled to monetary compensation."

      So this illegal or immoral thing is not exclusive to Clickbank!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841646].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author brennonhawkins
    There is evil in our world and there always will be. For the most part there's nothing we can do about it.
    Signature
    Soon-to-be father
    Loud mind, quiet mouth
    Passionate about Helping Others
    Internet Marketing for 10+ Years
    Favorite Motto: Just Do It!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841605].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    These immoral listings are surely illegal by FDA (US and UK, probably elsewhere too) standards. Do people really sell lies? If any of the companies I have worked alongside would have gone against FDA regulations, it could have ended in imprisonment. How are they getting away with it?
    Carefully worded disclaimers generally provide a free pass to get around such nuisances as FDA, FTC, AMA regulators and their international counterparts.

    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    Surely if people want to make money online via IM, then deploying a moral code of practice is essential. And schemes like these need to be acted upon.
    You're displaying symptoms of deep compulsive-obsessive anxiety disorder (COAD) induced by traumatized shock from multiple moral code violations for which I feel compelled to recommend this product on Clickbank:
    Natural Anxiety Treatment by a Psychiatrist

    It is from evidence based research and 15 years of successfully treating patients by a professional featured in the media and authoritative sources.

    Seriously though, read the disclaimer, which is quite typical for pseudo-medical marketing/sales copy.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841630].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
    The Internet is the new wild-wild West.
    Signature

    On the whole, you get what you pay for.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841703].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

      The Internet is the new wild-wild West.
      Yeah maybe 10 years ago. But it is not new anymore.

      However, I still think we are in the infancy stages of being able to make an very hefty amount of money with online endeavors if worked properly



      - Robert Andrew
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843405].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Monkmoney
    No different than half the commercials on tv
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9841720].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ClickBank
      Hi All,

      ClickBank continuously works to develop and enforce guidelines for the variety of products that we sell. In all cases, ClickBank works with vendors to ensure that they have read, understand, and are adhering to FTC guidelines. Specific to health and lifestyle products, diet and exercise often improve the lives of individuals. Conversely, poor eating and lack of exercise almost always make any medical situation worse. ClickBank today does not permit the sale of pills or supplements related to the treatment of any chronic medical condition. For this reason, the advice that vendors offer, regardless of how outlandish, often falls outside the scope of typical FDA guidelines. Regardless, ClickBank has already begun to take steps to eliminate or modify the marketing messages behind many health and remedy products. We encourage anyone to contact our abuse department with specific examples of improper marketing behavior so that we may take appropriate actions.

      Thanks,
      The ClickBank Team
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843298].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
        Originally Posted by ClickBank View Post

        Hi All,

        ClickBank continuously works to develop and enforce guidelines for the variety of products that we sell. In all cases, ClickBank works with vendors to ensure that they have read, understand, and are adhering to FTC guidelines. Specific to health and lifestyle products, diet and exercise often improve the lives of individuals. Conversely, poor eating and lack of exercise almost always make any medical situation worse. ClickBank today does not permit the sale of pills or supplements related to the treatment of any chronic medical condition. For this reason, the advice that vendors offer, regardless of how outlandish, often falls outside the scope of typical FDA guidelines. Regardless, ClickBank has already begun to take steps to eliminate or modify the marketing messages behind many health and remedy products. We encourage anyone to contact our abuse department with specific examples of improper marketing behavior so that we may take appropriate actions.

        Thanks,
        The ClickBank Team
        Translation: We can do it because it's not technically illegal. Ethics are irrelevant. People should eat better and exercise more. We are looking into it though, so stand by...stand by....stand by...


        Bottom line is that you have this crap in your market.
        Signature

        On the whole, you get what you pay for.

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843445].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Alexandre Valois
          Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

          Translation: We can do it because it's not technically illegal. Ethics are irrelevant. People should eat better and exercise more. We are looking into it though, so stand by...stand by....stand by...


          Bottom line is that you have this crap in your market.
          Not only in their market, but since according to their TOS they are essentially resellers and distributors of the product and not just a marketplace listing....

          They, as a seller, are the main target of any lawsuit or litigation that may arise. In case anyone is willing to fight that battle...
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843487].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
            This is important - and I'm sure ClickBank realizes their potential exposure in this...

            Originally Posted by Alexandre Valois View Post

            Not only in their market, but since according to their TOS they are essentially resellers and distributors of the product and not just a marketplace listing....

            They, as a seller, are the main target of any lawsuit or litigation that may arise. In case anyone is willing to fight that battle...
            ClickBank is NOT a payment processor, and they are not just an advertiser. They are an online merchant, selling products in their marketplace and they face a large amount of exposure with regard to FTC/FDC compliance.
            Signature

            Sid Hale
            Coming Soon... Rapid Action Profits (Pro)

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843821].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
          I'm not a big proponent of ClickBank, but I think you're being overly harsh and judgmental.

          Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

          Translation: We can do it because it's not technically illegal. Ethics are irrelevant. People should eat better and exercise more. We are looking into it though, so stand by...stand by....stand by...
          I think they have recognized the problem and taken a proactive approach to rectifying that problem. Just shutting down an offending product can have an adverse impact on their relationship with the merchant(s) and with any affiliate(s) who might already have outstanding campaigns for those products.

          Not sure what you see as the correct solution to the current situation, but It's good business for them to address each situation individually.


          Bottom line is that you have this crap in your market.
          As an affiliate, YOU get to choose which of those products you are willing to promote, so the existence of products that don't comply with FTC/FDC guidelines shouldn't really be a problem for you. Just research the product(s) and know what you are promoting.

          Note (if you are selecting products from the ClickBank marketplace base on gravity score):
          There have been many write ups here in the forum explaining why this is not necessarily a good indicator of potential sales. It should also be obvious that gravity score also contains NO provision for FTC/FDC compliance - so it's on the affiliate to research that compliance as a part of his/her product selection.
          Signature

          Sid Hale
          Coming Soon... Rapid Action Profits (Pro)

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843809].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
            Originally Posted by Sid Hale View Post

            I'm not a big proponent of ClickBank, but I think you're being overly harsh and judgmental.



            I think they have recognized the problem and taken a proactive approach to rectifying that problem. Just shutting down an offending product can have an adverse impact on their relationship with the merchant(s) and with any affiliate(s) who might already have outstanding campaigns for those products.

            Not sure what you see as the correct solution to the current situation, but It's good business for them to address each situation individually.




            As an affiliate, YOU get to choose which of those products you are willing to promote, so the existence of products that don't comply with FTC/FDC guidelines shouldn't really be a problem for you. Just research the product(s) and know what you are promoting.

            Note (if you are selecting products from the ClickBank marketplace base on gravity score):
            There have been many write ups here in the forum explaining why this is not necessarily a good indicator of potential sales. It should also be obvious that gravity score also contains NO provision for FTC/FDC compliance - so it's on the affiliate to research that compliance as a part of his/her product selection.
            Fair enough, in that I didn't make any effort to sugar-coat my response.

            Just shutting down an offending product can have an adverse impact on their relationship with the merchant(s) and with any affiliate(s) who might already have outstanding campaigns for those products.
            And? That is a cost of doing business if they accept shoddy products in the first place. Zero sympathies felt.

            Let's look at the chain of events:

            They charge vendors for the privilege of hosting products. I don't know if there's a per-product fee, but I know that they charge $49.99 straight up. I would assume that some of that fee goes towards gate-keeping.

            Then, they buy the product wholesale* from the vendor when a customer buys their product.

            At what point in that chain of events are they not liable for what is being sold? If there are products on there that advocate new age treatments that don't do anything, that is unacceptable.

            Now they are saying that they're cleaning up? That's the same as admitting that they dropped the ball. That's all I'm saying. They should clean up mighty fast.

            *Their terminology, not mine.


            art72 said:

            While areas like cancer or heart related conditions are often treated successfully through medical treatment/proceedures... It could be argued 'IF' a person believes they can indeed be cured (regardless of the unlikelihood)- perhaps some optimism towards such possibilities could prove the 'human mind' could defy medical science.
            The human mind has a great deal of influence over human health and lifespan.** That has been shown in peer-reviewed journals. People who tend to think negatively about aging don't life as long as those who view it in a positive light. So what? That doesn't magically protect people who sell fake "cures."

            ..So who really has any right to determine what's best for anothers utmost good?..health related or otherwise?
            That is irrelevant, imo. I think the issue is people who sell information that is bogus and then hide behind disclaimers. They are taking an active role is misleading people. There is nothing philosophical about that.

            ** If you want to live a long time, never retire. As the Japanese say, you always need an Ikigai, or a reason to live to 100.
            Signature

            On the whole, you get what you pay for.

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9846072].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              Originally Posted by swayman View Post

              The immoral thing about CB is your money will get deducted if there is no activity in your account.
              Only if you don't make a single sale for 90 days.

              I agree with you that the "dormant account charges" are a pain in the assets, but they're easy enough to circumvent, you know?

              You can easily just buy one $4/$5 product through your own hoplink (which is allowed, and you earn commission on it) on the 89th day to re-set the clock, if you want to.

              I accept that people whose primary motivation in this thread is to whine about ClickBank won't be stopped from doing so, and that's ok, if it's what you want to do. But if losing $1 every two weeks, after you haven't made a single sale for 90 days, is really that much of a big deal to you, one has to wonder whether running your own affiliate marketing business is really what you should be doing with your life, anyway?

              Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

              Now they are saying that they're cleaning up? That's the same as admitting that they dropped the ball.
              So if they don't say they're cleaning up, you think they're dishonest, and if they do say they're cleaning up, you criticise them for acknowledging that they dropped the ball? Not easy for them, is it?!

              Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

              That's all I'm saying.
              Unfortunately it isn't "all you're saying", at all. Far from it, in fact.

              Call me a skepchick, but the general tenor of this conversation reminds me, slightly, of all the people who struggle for years to set up an internet marketing business that depends entirely on search engines for its traffic, and when Google eventually changes some algorithm that destroys their business overnight, they then promptly "announce" here that it's "all Google's fault and internet marketing's a scam anyway".


              .
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9846123].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Cool Hand Luke
          Originally Posted by Ghoster View Post

          Translation: We can do it because it's not technically illegal. Ethics are irrelevant. People should eat better and exercise more. We are looking into it though, so stand by...stand by....stand by...


          Bottom line is that you have this crap in your market.
          Lol this.

          The #2 product in the Health/Fitness category is about a "Miracle Shake" that supposedly cures diabetes. Wow.

          More than half of the rest of the top sellers are other "miracle" cures for herpes, tinnitus, Alzheimer's, erectile dysfunction, hair loss, heart disease, etc.

          Clickbank is clearly fine selling this crap as long as the FTC doesn't come down on them, but let's not act like they don't know they're selling crap to people who need REAL solutions.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9900693].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            As long as there are customers for "snake oil" there will be people selling snake oil.

            The argument seems to be that instead of selling "fake cures" CB and others should sell "real cures". Not gonna happen - not realistic because those "cures" don't exist by ebook!

            It's the same thing in WSO's - people believe in the make-money-fast-easy and the live-on-passive-income "cures" to their money problems and they keep buying those 'fake cures'.

            Most people don't want to know about work involved - or medical costs/treatments...

            People buy dreams, hope and possibilities....so sellers keep selling them.
            Signature
            Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog
            ***
            It actually doesn't take much to be considered a 'difficult woman' -
            that's why there are so many of us.
            ...jane goodall
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9901162].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MikeTX
    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post

    How are they getting away with it?
    You are talking about products in health niche? Try to browse some forums related to a very specific disease.

    You will find usually one thread dedicated to the product and with real reviews (not the 'honest' ones from affiliates). 99% of disease cure products on CB can be called snake oil or scam if you prefer.

    It is sad, if people are desparate from not being able to cure their disease and someone's making living out of it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9843878].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Sloss
      Some excellent posts, Thank you.

      I am not very forum savvy and I was unable the "thank" your posts.

      To clarify I in no way was blaming Clickbank for the products being sold on their site, perhaps an over incendiary title. I also did not think I would get a response from the company, which was great. And I am very glad to see that you also want no part in exploitation.

      I am from the UK, which may account for some of the shock. The NHS pretty much controls everything and will not buy anything without significant proof. Therefore most pharma is B2B, typically with the best drugs being chosen. I spoke this over with some friends who brought up homeopathy, which I suppose isn't too far off, although its applications are for less serious conditions. Anyway, falling off-topic.

      I will endeavor to report anything that seems exploitative.

      Thanks again, happy marketing!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9844342].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author swayman
    The immoral thing about CB is your money will get deducted if there is no activity in your account.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9844391].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
      Originally Posted by swayman View Post

      The immoral thing about CB is your money will get deducted if there is no activity in your account.
      I noticed that yesterday too while looking over their fee schedule. That's pretty lame.
      Signature

      On the whole, you get what you pay for.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9846065].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author StingGB
      Originally Posted by swayman View Post

      The immoral thing about CB is your money will get deducted if there is no activity in your account.
      Swayman is right. Clickbank stole $160.00 of my money. Avoid like the plague.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9902349].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author art72
    While I cannot disagree that there are likely some false claims made or even debilitating statements made that defy medical science regarding some CB products, I would imagine it would be difficult for CB to prove true or false as to certain medical or health related options/offers.

    There are people in this world who have faced near death, and by 'believing' enough in a (dare I say a cure) who've completely defied medical sciences.

    While areas like cancer or heart related conditions are often treated successfully through medical treatment/proceedures... It could be argued 'IF' a person believes they can indeed be cured (regardless of the unlikelihood)- perhaps some optimism towards such possibilities could prove the 'human mind' could defy medical science.

    Now I am certainly NOT suggesting that a voodoo priestess is a better choice for a terminally ill cancer patient than that of chemotherapy... Although, it would seem equally bias to not allow 'the patient' the right to choose what they feel would serve them best.

    Having read plenty of malpractice suits that have lead to death in simple operating rooms, I for one may choose 'alternative medicines' myself. But, I am bias...I hate hospitals!!!

    Thankfully, I've yet to face any severe illnesses... And if I should ever, Clickbank damn sure wouldn't be a place I'd seek my solution from, nor would I imagine many people would(?).

    I understand your frustration being you have (from what it appears) intelligence and knowledge in the medical field...but Shaman's and other spiritual based teachings often defy today's expansive knowledge in producing results that by science alone would never be accepted in the medical sense.

    ...So who really has any right to determine what's best for anothers utmost good?..health related or otherwise?

    Certainly, if CB were to determine a products claims to be illegal or immoral, I trust they would remove those products and vendors from their marketplace... Just as the FDC does the drugs many hospitals have mass distributed - before learning the 'long term affects' and the damages done.

    Lastly, I could argue that it's 'immoral' to be charged $1,437.26US for a visit to an emergency room for an ichy rash, a Benadryl tablet, and 15 minutes with a nurse practicioner to tell someone; "it appears to be some sort of illergic reaction."

    - Come to think of it; that last paragraph above and Obama care should be illegal!
    Signature
    Atop a tree with Buddha ain't a bad place to take rest!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9844545].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Monkmoney
    Its really an arguement over seculsr and fringe.science, just because the universal opinion is only pharmeceuticals can fix you, doesnt mean its true, thats the fallacy of majority rules

    Its up to the consumer to judge a product and use due diligence
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9844822].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
    So if they don't say they're cleaning up, you think they're dishonest, and if they do say they're cleaning up, you criticise them for acknowledging that they dropped the ball? Not easy for them, is it?!
    Is there any reason it should be? They're making money hand over fist. A bit of accountability is not much to ask for.

    Unfortunately it isn't "all you're saying", at all. Far from it, in fact.

    Call me a skepchick, but the general tenor of this conversation reminds me, slightly, of all the people who struggle for years to set up an internet marketing business that depends entirely on search engines for its traffic, and when Google eventually changes some algorithm that destroys their business overnight, they then promptly "announce" here that it's "all Google's fault and internet marketing's a scam anyway".
    Um..ok, w/e. Tell me what I'm really saying that I left out. I don't use CB, so I have no loyalties to them. This means I can be objective. Which I am.

    They are treading a very thin line that won't last forever. Sorry if that upsets anyone, but it's the truth.
    Signature

    On the whole, you get what you pay for.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9846147].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author art72
    In response to Ghosters above statement regarding "people selling fake cures"...

    I'm NOT suggesting 'fake cures' should be tolerated by any means, nor am I standing in CB's corner concerning their 'clean up' admissions...which I am all for them removing ANY bogus products, be it false health related products or shotty IM products.

    My take was simply that Clickbank' is not likely going to 'test' the claims made within a vendors product to have it meet their guidelines for submission. Naturally, if a product at Toys R Us is found to present a choking hazard...they recall said item and stop selling that vendors product...the moral thing to do.

    Does Toys R Us get sued because a hungry kid eats the head off a Barbie doll, chokes, and dies?

    (*not wishing such a thing would ever happen, tho it probable has!)

    People drown in 5 gallon buckets...does that mean all 5gallon buckets should be banned?

    When these multi-billion dollar marketplaces/distributorships cater to a multitude of products (health related or otherwise) it behooves me that anyone would assume they would be held liable simply for facilitating sales of an inferior or potentially harmful item being amoungst their inventory?

    Why should CB be viewed any differently. There are false health claims all over the net, and sadly CB probably houses a few scraggles...until it is made known to them (with justifiable evidence) that said products are shit...whereby, CB will likely remove said product.

    Until then, or that day comes that a product is made known to be hazardous to CB and more importantly potential buyers... what exactly do you expect them to do...hire human guinea pigs test the Mona Vie for before it is approved into their market place?

    C'mon... I seriously doubt CB should be scrutanized as the Kevorkian of internet health care!

    Again, I agree CB should remove said products and maybe even the vendor altogether 'IF' they are made aware said product is 'reported' to be making false claims, fake cures, or potentially harmful to prospective 'buyers'.... But how will they know until Barbie's head is bobbing in someones esophagus?

    (*Metaphorically speaking of course!)

    My take which was perhaps philosophical, was based on the premise;

    Who determines 'if' the product delivers... if not the responsibility of the buyer/consumer.

    I for one would love if CB actually listed actual user/purchaser testimonies or comment like Walmart...so u could gauge what the buyers experience (and/or real feedback) was towards the product. Even then, people would buy a 5 star IM product and bitch it didnt work. Now is that the buyers fault? CB's fault? or the vendor/creators fault?

    Point being, bashing CB, the internet, and asking questions about immorality & legalities relating to false health remedies here, would be the equivalent to asking Hitler to embrace Jesus!

    If the original poster has 'viable knowledge' that someone is violating the wellbeing of the public by pushing a turd through CB... Then the solution is simple contact CB, the FTC or whatever health related authorities and shut the product down!!!

    I may have gone overboard a bit 'assuming' the real debate was 'possibly' a science -vs- a human rights issue... But bashing Clickbank for having admitted they are aware some products/vendors are subsequently causing them unwanted publicity, and they have legal disclaimers in place won't change the fact...its not only CB dealing with these types of issues...the FDA, Google, Hospitals, Walmart, Toys R Us, etc... All have similar responsibilities as a business entity and I for one 'choose' to respect that fact health related items distributed should be thoroughly investigated...not only at CB, but at hospitals, the FDA, and abroad.

    Thats my philosophy!
    (Cause quite honestly...I don't trust 1/2 the crap the FDA approves...but that ain't stopping them from mass marketing drugs...despite the potential side affects, is it?)

    So why pick on little ol' Clickbank?
    Signature
    Atop a tree with Buddha ain't a bad place to take rest!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9846909].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    Very good point....

    just ask Kevin Trudeau who sold infomercial products - health and stuff

    there is also so much blatant nonsense in the "get rich quick" junk too.....this forum apparently cut down on the income "claims" nonsense

    you still see things that make you go hmmm....a guy pushing a "rags to riches" ebook yet asking about survey sites that pay pennies - so desperate to get some money finally - LOL

    Look at William J McCorkle and wife Chantel - both did federal time for false "get rich" infomercials...false income claims and paying people/actors for fake reviews (on the commercials)

    Now fast forward to today - fake income claims, fake and shill reviews (the fiverr review tapes haha)

    It would be interesting if the Feds looked into this huh? and some of these bogus health claims...that could really hurt some hopeful sick person grasping at straws and snake oil
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9901444].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CurtisSWN
    If you're concerned about ethical products, avoid the so-called public records product. I started to sell them until I found out how much of a fraud they were, it's always good to google "product" + scams, problems, etc
    Signature
    Simple Two Step Formula
    Earns Me Over $146.72 in 12 Hours. This is Weird, But it Works!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9901499].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Lightlysalted
    Sadly some people have no ethics! I hate seeing products like these IMO click bank should be held legally responsible
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9901505].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author focusedlife
    Originally Posted by Sloss View Post


    Some were so bold to say that medicine will not help you and you should stop with medicine and take their products. This is very damaging, and, at worst could result in a treatable death.
    What is a treatable death?

    Los
    Signature
    The only group with more actionable info than any WSO → The Parlay Society
    Want me to write stuff for you? → Click here to check this out
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9901862].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    Kevin Trudeau
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Born Kevin Mark Trudeau
    February 6, 1963 (age 52)
    Lynn, Massachusetts, US
    Occupation Author, radio and television personality
    Known for Promoting alternative medicine
    Founding the International Pool Tour
    Criminal charge
    Fraud, larceny and contempt of court
    Regulatory settlements with the FTC and eight state Attorneys-General for false claims and misleading representations
    Kevin Mark Trudeau (/truːˈdoʊ/; born February 6, 1963) is an American author, radio personality, infomercial host, salesman and convicted fraudster who has promoted various unsubstantiated health, diet and financial remedies. Several of his books, including Natural Cures "They" Don't Want You to Know About, allege that both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the pharmaceutical industry value profit over treatments or cures. [B]He is currently incarcerated at Federal Prison Camp Montgomery, near Montgomery, Alabama, and is scheduled for release on July 18, 2022.
    Kevin Trudeau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9902331].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author asamanthinketh
    If the medical profession can

    1. Give empirical evidence for the diagnosis, treatment & cure of psychiatric illness

    2. Truly, impartially and without prejudice verify safety, efficacy and superiority of traditional medicine for the cure of Cancer, MS and AIDS

    3. Honestly say that it's SOP gives precedence to eliminating cause over managing symptoms, and education of clients (patients).

    Then maybe we could talk about "moral" issues.

    Until then, I suggest Traditional Medicine & Pharmacy take the log out of their own eye before suggesting that others remove the little specks in theirs.

    NOT That I support people who foolish peddle quack remedies to desperate individuals just for a quick buck by the way.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9903090].message }}

Trending Topics