What do you think of slick sales pages?

by Carl Hughes 19 replies
Ok here is my rant...it seems that everyone is saying that you need a slick sales page or lead capture page. Yes it has to look professional there is no doubt. But in all honesty when you see these really slick lead capture pages or websites promising the sun and the moon and a bottle of real fine scotch to does it draw you in or make you want to click away from it?
#main internet marketing discussion forum #pages #sales #slick
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Liu
    "It depends on who is going to read it."

    I heard this from a marketer before. If I'm a web savvy and read many sales page every month, normal sales page will drive me away. I'll simply look at the bullet points and scroll down all the way to the price.

    I used to read the whole thing when I was new to internet!
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  • Profile picture of the author ExRat
    Hi Carl,

    it seems that everyone is saying that you need a slick sales page or lead capture page
    Who is this everyone that you are referring to? Are they qualified?

    Have you noticed that many of the things that 'everyone' says are often incorrect, just second-hand rumours that they heard from what they perceived as an authority?

    I'm just re-reading an interesting book by an 'authority' (in my opinion) and he says,

    "you are the market"

    "create the product you want to buy"

    "if you are a salesman, sell like you would want to be sold to"

    (ring any bells anyone?)

    So my advice Carl is don't pay too much attention to what people are saying. Instead, pay attention to what they are doing. Pay attention to what seems to be working. Then follow the advice given above and test it out. Then make up your OWN mind.

    Alex has a point that we become jaded after a period of time and what attracted us originally may not anymore.

    So put yourself back into your own shoes when you were in the same position as your target market.

    And most of all, don't worry about what people are saying. They will tell you your stuff is crap before and after they buy it sometimes. How they really feel is demonstrated by the action they took.
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      There's only one solution to this if you're actually creating a sales page.

      Gain an intimate knowledge of the prospects who'll be going there.

      You want to know if YOUR prospects will respond to fancy graphics or be put off by them.

      You want to know what builds trust with YOUR SPECIFIC prospects and what gets them to take action.

      Talking to your prospects, exchanging emails with them and engaging them in every way possible so you really get to know them is THE biggest key to successful marketing.

      I will give you one tip that seems to work across all markets.

      The more specific you are the more believable and enticing most sales pages and optin pages become.

      For example if you say:

      Amazing New System Can Make You Rich FASTER Than A Mint On Steroids!

      that's not compelling or believable.

      But if you're specific:

      Georgia Housewife Makes $5,742.44 In 25 Days With System Recommended In The September 24th Issue Of The Wall St Journal

      your chances of getting the attention of your reader goes up substantially.

      Notice also how using very specific words and figures in the second headline eliminates the need for the hype you find in the first headline.

      You can deliver specific facts and figures very low key and they're still very powerful.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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    • Profile picture of the author KarlWarren
      Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

      I'm just re-reading an interesting book by an 'authority' (in my opinion) and he says,

      "you are the market"

      "create the product you want to buy"

      "if you are a salesman, sell like you would want to be sold to"

      (ring any bells anyone?)
      I hear the bells very subtle, most likely unintentional
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      eCoverNinja - Sales Page Graphics & Layout Specialist
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  • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
    Thank you for all of your input. As you know there are all kinds of people out there selling this product and that for graphics and copy writing services etc. it has always been my contention that the more hyped up the page appears the less believable it is. so to my way of thinking simple, plain and just the facts mam sales pages and opt in pages would have the best results. Has anyone done any split testing on the same niche/product to back this up one way or the other?
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    • Profile picture of the author TimGross
      Originally Posted by Carl Hughes View Post

      Has anyone done any split testing on the same niche/product to back this up one way or the other?
      Hi Carl;

      Yes, I have... First off, it's important to realize that the "make money" market is very different from most other markets, so what works well in one market may not work in another.

      For "make money" ads, it's often the case that the hypey sales letters pull better than non-hype sales letters. (Not that it's always the case, but biz-opp'ers have been trained to expect some hype)

      Transferring that hype to non biz-opp offers often fails miserably. (I remember being asked to review someone's sales letter once who actually said, "For the price of dinner and a movie, you can cure your cancer!" -Yikes.)

      Anyway... I have a very detailed critique of two sales letters I wrote, the first one a bit hypey that didn't work well, and the second one with all hype removed, which converted at 1 sale per 10 visitors.

      If you want to see review the sales letters yourself, they're in my free subscribers "Private" area, on the "Website Makeover" page, videos number 7 and 8.

      You might want to review Paul Myers' "What Is Hype" thread for detailed info: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...what-hype.html

      ...The trick is, that just because a sales letter doesn't seem "hypey" doesn't mean it's not a very strong sales letter. A lot of people, when they're dead-set against writing a hypey sales letter, just create a really poor sales letter. Non-hype just means keeping credibility, not being a wimp.

      Anyway, hope that helped. :-)

      PS - My personal pet peeve is hype in software sales letters... I remember trying to choose affiliate program software years ago, and having to wade through crap like, "Imagine having an army of salesmen selling for you while you're sleeping!!!!" ...while I was just trying to A/B the features against their competitors.
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      • Profile picture of the author TimothyW
        I think there's a difference between 'hype' and giving the reader the letter was written by a huckster.

        One is an issue of hyperbole (which may produce good results), and then there's the issue of a smarmy lack of trustworthiness -- which will not produce a good result.

        If they feel they can trust you (the writer), then they will read what you have to say -- even if it's 'salesy.'

        Trust is the main ingredient for success. Trust about you as a person, overall. The minute you (personally) come off as a HUCKSTER, the game is over.

        I think that's what you may be getting at when you say 'slick.'

        Yes?

        -- TW
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      • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
        Originally Posted by TimGross View Post

        Hi Carl;
        (I remember being asked to review someone's sales letter once who actually said, "For the price of dinner and a movie, you can cure your cancer!" -Yikes.)
        Oh man now that is pretty pathetic to take someones desperation and build hope in them just to make a sale when we are talking about there very life
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  • Profile picture of the author theVFusionGroup
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    • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
      Could this be the goose that laid the golden egg?

      That is what a new person looking to make money on line may be thinking when they see the following.

      Our program is unique. Would you like to be your own boss and work from home? We guarantee that you will be paid $15 to $25 per email that you process successfully.

      it is just this kind of slick advertising that in all probabilty is nothing but hog wash that I am against (and hence the rant)
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  • Profile picture of the author Lance K
    Originally Posted by Carl Hughes View Post

    But in all honesty when you see these really slick lead capture pages or websites promising the sun and the moon and a bottle of real fine scotch to does it draw you in or make you want to click away from it?
    I demand you point me to that lead capture page immediately.

    Seriously, quit holding out.
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    • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
      Originally Posted by Lance K View Post

      I demand you point me to that lead capture page immediately.

      Seriously, quit holding out.
      I was kidding about the fine scotch (wishful thinking on my part)
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  • Profile picture of the author 2bwealthy
    I dont read long winded hyped up sales pages any more. I just look at the bullets, see the price and move on. If I see a capture page with a Palm tree, a mansion, an expensive car and some guy holding cash in his hand I move on. I prefer something will provide real info and not flashy or hyped.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Williams
    Somebody asked earlier what is hype. I believe it's short for hyperbole or exaggeration. Don't exaggerate. Tell it like it is like Andrew said and if you are selling something of value the cold hard facts should sell the thing on it's own.
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    • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
      Originally Posted by Mike Williams View Post

      Somebody asked earlier what is hype. I believe it's short for hyperbole or exaggeration. Don't exaggerate. Tell it like it is like Andrew said and if you are selling something of value the cold hard facts should sell the thing on it's own.

      I agree with you 100% the big trick here though as i see it is to determine who your audience is and to gear those facts in such a way that it will stimulate the buy it now response. The big question in my mind however is how to determine the best type of lead page/sales page for any given target audience
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  • Yes, "everyone" has a tendency to flat out wrong, at least more wrong than right.

    As for slick sales pages, it really does depend on who is reading them. If you're marketing to marketers then a 'slick' sales page may bomb completely.

    If on the other hand you are selling something to people with foot fungus, then a slick sales page would probably work wonderfully.

    It's all about WHO you are selling to not WHAT you are selling.



    (Ok, maybe not 'all' about but maybe 70/30 in favor of WHO!)
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    • Profile picture of the author Justin Harrison
      Hi Carl,

      The comment I am about to make should really be saved to my roboform file, because I say it all the time to people yet few really seem to heed the lesson.

      As Internet Marketers and as people we always assume we THINK we know what people want or need, and we tend to follow what everyone is doing like a bunch of zombies.

      This whole process is really simple, you can assume whatever you like about what your audience wants, but until you TEST, you have no idea!

      Plain and simple!
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      • Profile picture of the author Carl Hughes
        Originally Posted by Justin Harrison View Post

        Hi Carl,

        The comment I am about to make should really be saved to my roboform file, because I say it all the time to people yet few really seem to heed the lesson.

        As Internet Marketers and as people we always assume we THINK we know what people want or need, and we tend to follow what everyone is doing like a bunch of zombies.

        This whole process is really simple, you can assume whatever you like about what your audience wants, but until you TEST, you have no idea!

        Plain and simple!
        yes Justin that is so true you must test test test some more and then TEST other wise you fall victim to the "lemming syndrome"
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  • Profile picture of the author Kelly Verge
    I threw up a quick squeeze page to start building a list -- I had the intention of replacing it with something slicker once I was done, but had to move quickly to jump on an opportunity.

    I've since tried 11 different (better-looking) squeeze pages, but none convert even close to this plain, ugly page. It doesn't even have benefits - it's just an H1 one-liner + ecover + optin form.

    It all depends on the market.
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