Brand Names in Domain Names

by Vernon
13 replies
I am currently working through two different courses on Amazon Associates. When it comes to picking product domain names, one course author cautions strongly against using brand names in your domain names, while the other seems to make a regular practice of this. I'm wondering what the pros and cons are. Thanks.
#brand #domain #names
  • Profile picture of the author onSubie
    The big risk is that having a trademarked name in your domain leaves you open to being sued.

    If you have bestsonytv.com then Sony could quickly and easily take your domain away and sue for damages.

    The advantage, obviously, is that the brand lends credibility as well as an SEO boost since many people will include the brand name in their searches.

    It is also more targeted traffic because as people move from "research mode" to "buying mode" brand names are a bigger part of their search.


    Why would one guru say "Avoid brand names" and another say "It doesn't matter"?

    The reality is that just because you are using a trademark in your domain does not automatically mean you will be sued. Many marketers simply take the risk that they will fly under the radar.

    This has bit many people in the proverbial ass.

    Some companies are more aggressive at protecting their brand than others.

    It is very dangerous to recommend illegal activities to students.

    If I had a course that taught me techniques that could result in me being liable in a lawsuit, I would ask for an immediate refund.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910143].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      If you still have questions, contact the company, tell them specifically what you want to do, then if they give you permission to use their name . . . "get it in writing" and proceed as directed.

      Steve
      Signature

      Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
      SteveBrowneDirect

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910150].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
      Originally Posted by onSubie View Post

      Some companies are more aggressive at protecting their brand than others.
      Yep. Playboy, Mattel, Taylor Swift, Ebay immediately come to mind with knee-jerk responses regardless of the actual use of the name in the domain.

      UDRPsearch.com is a great place to evaluate this issue. Example: check out the incredible number of UDRP actions filed by Swarovski:

      UDRPsearch - UDRP / WIPO / NAF / ADR.eu Domain Dispute Search

      Good thing they're a big company, because spending a couple grand to take down $10 domains adds up.

      .
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910323].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    If I had a course that taught me techniques that could result in me being liable in a lawsuit, I would ask for an immediate refund.
    Ditto.

    Unfortunately it seems to be fairly common. I went through a course recently that suggests setting up fake sweepstakes. No one ever wins, and the author just blew by that little detail.
    Signature
    Get Off The Warrior Forum Now & Don't Come Back If You Want To Succeed!
    All The Real Marketers Are Gone. There's Nothing Left But Weak, Sniveling Wanna-Bees!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910155].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    I think we're confusing brandable domains and keyword domains here, folks.

    Before Twitter arrived on the scene, choosing Twitter.com was a choice in a brandable domain. A domain that could be branded, obviously. Whereas, something like MakeMoneyOnline.com would be a keyword domain, since it receives more than a healthy number of searches.

    But how to decide between the two? Personally, I always advocate a keyword domain. And this has no relation to SEO. A keyword domain is generally worth more. Therefore, when you begin a new website development, by purchasing (or registering) a domain of value, you're already adding worth to your enterprise.

    On the other hand, a brandable domain is useful nowadays. Most clever marketers utilize social networks and viral marketing. It often makes it easier to do so with a brandable name; something short, easy to spell and remember, and something that captures the general message you want to put out to your target audience.

    Rushed reply. In a meeting. You get the gist.

    Tom
    Signature

    I Coach: Learn More | My Latest WF Thread: Dead Domains/ Passive Traffic

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910164].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author onSubie
      Originally Posted by Get Rich Methods View Post

      I think we're confusing brandable domains and keyword domains here, folks.


      Actually, he is talking about using brands trademarked by other companies in your domain like:


      best-sony-tv.com
      paypal-secrets.com
      canon-hd-reviews.com



      Originally Posted by Get Rich Methods View Post

      Rushed reply. In a meeting. You get the gist.

      Then you are forgiven for misreading the OP
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910172].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    You're talking about Trademarks. A trademark is established and owned. It is the responsibility of the trademark owner to protect the trademark, or risk losing it. Therefore, legal action is usually taken on anyone using the trademark in a way that may cause the public to believe they are dealing with the trademarked company. There are many gray areas, and some permitted uses, but without written auhorization, you'd be opening yourself to a very expensive court battle.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910216].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Zenoth
    Amazon is definitely against the use of the word "Amazon" in domain names.

    If they do something about it ... I do not know, but I'd recommend you to take no risks.

    For example, look at the point 2. (g) from their Amazon Product Advertising API agreement, where they clearly specify that you are forbidden to use the term "amazon" in the domain name if you intend to use that API.
    Probably same rule applies in general.

    Some companies choose to take action about it, while others often overlook it.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910354].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      one course author cautions strongly against using brand names in your domain names, while the other seems to make a regular practice of this
      I'd stick with the first course - and refund the second one.
      Signature

      Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.
      It takes nothing away from a human to be kind to an animal.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9910403].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dpwilliams
    It definitely depends on what kind of products you're dealing with so I just wanted to mention you can get product names in your domain without infringing on trademarks.

    Buy something generic and relevant like...

    todaystvreview.com

    and you can use

    todaystvreview.com/sony/sony-xyz-model
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9917320].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WarriorWasim
    Hi, I'll suggest you to stay out of that course that teach you to use illegal things and stay out of the trademark domains.They built their brand and its better we don't play with them.Thanks :-)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9917365].message }}

Trending Topics