Does this bother you as a buyer?

by Raydal
36 replies
You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
you later find the same offer.

You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.

Should it really matter what the seller does with his product once
you got value for your purchase?

Please share your views below, thanks.

-Ray Edwards
#bother #buyer
  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    Ray,

    Almost all of the products out there sell like this,

    They offer you a ONE time discount but when you come back a few weeks later, the same 24 hour discount never went away.

    Websites use this because it sells and it increases sales conversions.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027041].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author David Keith
    i have done this stuff long enough to know its just part of the game. I guess it really is kinda sad that i am jaded to the point where i accept being lied to is just normal.

    i guess i look at it almost like the "unlimited" hosting plans for $10 a month. i know its a gimmick...most people do as well these days. the same thing applies to these "otos".

    its very comparable to the late night infomercials where you buy 1 and get 1 free...just pay separate shipping...which just happens to be the same price or more as the product.

    consumers keep rewarding this sort of stuff, so it gets to the point where most of us just accept being lied to.

    i dont like it, the people who do that will never be considered my friends. i just dont associate with people who play those sorta games at the expense of others. but the reality is that its so prevalent in the I.M. world that its just part of buying tools and information.

    i sure wouldnt trust the people who do that to watch my wallet or my kids. They have proven what their priorities are and they dont line up with mine. but i get that its just part of the game in this industry these days, so i accept it to some degree.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027112].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author aspire7
    Its a shame that marketing has become so competitive that people now see lies as the norm.
    It can make giving something genuinely free or selling something truly great a lot harder.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027115].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

    You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
    you later find the same offer.

    You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.

    Should it really matter what the seller does with his product once
    you got value for your purchase?

    Please share your views below, thanks.

    -Ray Edwards
    Personally, I just don't care. If the Product has helped me then that is all that matters.

    Bickering about "why is this price now " or "why is it being offered again" is just a waste of time


    - Robert Andrew
    Signature

    Nothing to see here including a Sig so just move on :)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027118].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TJoseph
    I think it kills credibility. As a business owner, you should respect your customer well enough and honour their action of buying into your 'special' offer. As age old as this may sound, respect and honour shouldn't be sacrificed in the pursuit of building wealth.

    If I found out that the deadline was fake and I had bought into it, there's a high chance I'll distance myself from doing business with them again.
    Signature
    Want To Know How People Make A Full Time Living Off The Easiest Money Making Site In The World?
    Check out my new WSO
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027125].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I've seen in done many times as well and I know it brings more
    sales but when I make a promise I keep it because when it is done
    to me I don't like it one bit. I feel that my credibility is worth more than
    the extra money.

    So I try to be very careful about the promises I make in the first place.
    I'm not claiming perfection in this regards but I do try to respect the
    intelligence and loyalty of my customers.

    -Ray Edwards
    Signature
    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027223].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      I feel that my credibility is worth more than
      the extra money.
      I started a policy a couple years ago that "prices only go up." I don't put anything on sale. If I want to make a cheaper offer, I'll produce a lower-level product. And every time I update or upgrade, I raise the price.

      I do, however, warn my customers of impending upgrades to give them a chance at buying before the price hike. It goes kind of like "improve product -> update existing customers -> write new copy."
      Signature
      "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030835].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RonBartling
    It certainly hurts their credibility with me and makes me less likely to buy the next time they promote something unless it was truly killer. Most of the time it was not.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027241].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

    You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
    you later find the same offer.

    You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.
    Experienced buyers learn that those examples are poor criteria on which to base a purchasing decision, especially when it impacts on your business. If the product or service isn't a good fit, no deadline or special offer is likely to make it worthwhile.

    Marketers who abuse such sales tactics value short-term gain over long-term credibility.


    Frank
    Signature


    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027249].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    There's a simple more trustworthy solution, coupon codes.
    Signature
    Hi
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027253].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author J50
    I am a firm believer that if your product and service is any good you don't need to use any marketing ploys or lies to sell more units of it.

    Sure you can make more money lying and using deceiving tactics, but you can make millions selling shoddy and damn right scammy investment schemes over the phone so where do you call the line?

    Unfortunately I keep seeing and saw today more companies that seem to glorify films like the Wolf of Wall Street, sad state of affairs really.

    You can be hungry for business without being a scumbag IMO. Put more effort into making great products and services I would suggest.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10027270].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Slade556
    It's a bit disappointing, from a buyer's point of view, but on the other hand I'm not personally bothered by it. I rarely buy a product just because it's on sale, I buy it because I need it. So, if I needed it at the time AND got to buy it at a lower price, it's a double win for me.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030552].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
    Yes, it bothers me. Not so much that others will get the product, too, but because the vendor used questionable selling tactics.

    Of course, there are hoards of people here saying that this is perfectly acceptable because it increases ROI. I even heard one guy saying that it's okay to sell e-books promising to heal certain health problems, which of course isn't true, because Coca Cola and tobacco companies kill people every year, so why can't they lie to people?

    As always, those people are not very bright.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030706].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author icoachu
    Yes, it would bother me... a lot.

    Talking about feeling LIED TO.

    Also, it speaks volumes about the QUALITY of the product you're buying.

    Bad move.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030717].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030801].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Raydal
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      The only time it would bother me is when I purchased on the condition that only a limited quantity of the product would be sold or given away and discovered that a lot more were sold. That's a line that cannot be crossed or excused under any circumstances.
      For sure.

      Reminds me of a resale rights offer I made to my customer list where I was
      selling just 25 licenses. I later made the same offer and a customer who had
      bought the first time around wrote me an angry email. She ASSUMED I had
      sold out on the licenses and was breaking my former limit.

      She was wrong because I did not sell out all the license in the first promotion
      but had closed it prematurely, but I did understand her anger. I was victim
      to that same "thinking it was limited and it was not" situation from a certain
      infamous Warrior from long ago.

      Part of some products value is their limited number. Limited editions are
      more expensive because they are limited.

      -Ray Edwards
      Signature
      The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031388].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author angry cowboy
    its the strategy of marketing now a days...it will convert more customer than normal.....u will buy a thing by thinking that the offer will ended today but next day u see the offer is still there...that's irritating but its the true...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030804].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author xembergg
    Its a marketing trap, every marketer does this type of false promotion these days. Discounts are everywhere, lol
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030805].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author karlstech
    Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

    You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
    you later find the same offer.

    You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.

    Should it really matter what the seller does with his product once
    you got value for your purchase?

    Please share your views below, thanks.

    -Ray Edwards
    I've seen this over and over again and quite frankly, I think it's a dishonorable marketing tactic that relies on our impulses rather than our logical thinking.

    Sure, it might be a lucrative sales strategy but what happens when a few of your earliest customers confront you with this? Or even worse, lash out on social media and scare off potential buyers?

    If one has a one-time offer or product, stick with that.

    If it was a good seller, then upgrade the product and make some changes to it, THEN put launch it again, saying that you've upgraded it and now it's even better. I don't know, could come off as wrong as well.

    Anyway, if you want to sell a product for a one-time offer and change your mind when you see how well it's doing, leave it and explain how it's providing so much value to your customers that it needs to stay on the market for a while longer.

    So in short, yes this strategy bothers me!

    Karl
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030834].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    IMO, it's a matter of integrity and a person keeping their word. There are ways to create scarcity and still keep your word.
    Signature
    Discover the fastest and easiest ways to create your own valuable products.
    Tons of FREE Public Domain content you can use to make your own content, PLR, digital and POD products.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10030900].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ecoverartist
    Call me old fashioned, but when someone breaks a promise (even if it's a somewhat shallow urgency-bait internet marketing one), it unfortunately makes me think they'll break others too - maybe offer less in terms of value, support, etc.

    Even if that's absolutely not the case and I got a lot of value or learned something important from their offer, I can't help but think that it reflects poorly on them as a person to resort to something like that when there are much better ways to communicate scarcity without resorting to cheap tricks.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031269].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author PLR Basket
    I personally think it's horrible. I'd feel totally disrespected.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031274].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Janice Sperry
    I just saw an auto maker advertise on television for a 25k+ car. If you bought before xx/xx/15 you would get a $500 rebate. I can't believe people still fall for this but they obviously do or car companies would quit doing it. They have been offering cash back, low interest loans, etc for 30+? years and it still must work.

    Our local mattress and carpet stores have "sales" virtually 365 days a year.

    Of course, even though these kinds of sales and rebates are ridiculous, they do pretty much legally have to honor the terms of the "special offer." One ends and the other begins after being switched up just a little bit.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031305].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Janice Sperry View Post

      I just saw an auto maker advertise on television for a 25k+ car. If you bought before xx/xx/15 you would get a $500 rebate. I can't believe people still fall for this but they obviously do or car companies would quit doing it. They have been offering cash back, low interest loans, etc for 30+? years and it still must work.

      Our local mattress and carpet stores have "sales" virtually 365 days a year.

      Of course, even though these kinds of sales and rebates are ridiculous, they do pretty much legally have to honor the terms of the "special offer." One ends and the other begins after being switched up just a little bit.
      Reminds me of a time when my ex and I went shopping for furniture. We saw something we both liked, but I wanted to wait.


      She told me that we should hurry because the store was having a sale. I told her I didn't think we really had to hurry because the store had painted "Sale" on the building.
      Signature
      Discover the fastest and easiest ways to create your own valuable products.
      Tons of FREE Public Domain content you can use to make your own content, PLR, digital and POD products.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031365].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author neodarth
    Fake scarcity is part of the game plan of many marketers, dead lines, limited stock even dime sales are normal.

    How many offers you find every single day that tells you that only 500 copies will be sold and you see the affiliate pages where the first price is for the one that sells 1000 copies.

    Or how many of us (yes I include myself) has used the new sales pages layout whit the countdown clock? It's no sin to use it, even though is a pain in the butt for those who use the sniper approach for our affiliate efforts (we can rely solely on email marketing for those kind of offers because there is no time for rely on SEO sites).

    But you have to deal with the rules of this kind of marketing if you are in the affiliate business, and tweak your campaigns according to the offer, and remember that not all affiliates offers are made equal.

    cheers
    Signature
    ==> Negocios Estables en la Web Internet marketing en español.

    ==> Internet Marketing Newbie Created for IM virgins
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031411].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by neodarth View Post

      Fake scarcity is part of the game plan of many marketers, dead lines, limited stock even dime sales are normal.

      How many offers you find every single day that tells you that only 500 copies will be sold and you see the affiliate pages where the first price is for the one that sells 1000 copies.

      Or how many of us (yes I include myself) has used the new sales pages layout whit the countdown clock? It's no sin to use it, even though is a pain in the butt for those who use the sniper approach for our affiliate efforts (we can rely solely on email marketing for those kind of offers because there is no time for rely on SEO sites).

      But you have to deal with the rules of this kind of marketing if you are in the affiliate business, and tweak your campaigns according to the offer, and remember that not all affiliates offers are made equal.

      cheers
      But there's no need to lie about scarcity. You can raise the price or offer limited time bonuses. You can even take the product off the market for a time, telling people they won't be able to buy again until some point in the future.


      It really doesn't take much effort to create scarcity and be honest at the same time, while leaving your options open for marketing in the future as well.
      Signature
      Discover the fastest and easiest ways to create your own valuable products.
      Tons of FREE Public Domain content you can use to make your own content, PLR, digital and POD products.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031441].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Greaney
    Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

    You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
    you later find the same offer.

    You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.

    Should it really matter what the seller does with his product once
    you got value for your purchase?

    Please share your views below, thanks.

    -Ray Edwards
    A lot of people believe that using false scarcity is a dishonest business tactic. I myself don't have a problem with it.

    We've all seen the ads "Call in the next 20 minutes and you will receive 2 for the price of 1" or something like that.

    I believe it is a legit business angle but I know others will disagree.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031421].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author PLR Basket
      Originally Posted by Greaney View Post

      A lot of people believe that using false scarcity is a dishonest business tactic. I myself don't have a problem with it.

      We've all seen the ads "Call in the next 20 minutes and you will receive 2 for the price of 1" or something like that.

      I believe it is a legit business angle but I know others will disagree.
      Real scarcity is ok. Fake scarcity is just plain deceptive. I'm not for it.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031440].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author StevieT
    hmmm, the longer you buy from a company the more you see the flaws in their marketing strategy. However, when I stay long enough with a company to see those, I tend to forgive them.

    What's important to me is that the rest is done correctly, payments, invoice, getting my order on time, showing prices including taxes etc. Those small texts to get me over the edge of buying are not very important to me, though I have to say I personally don't like to put pressure on my buyers.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031426].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mark Mazza
    I suppose it should bother you, but this is very common selling practice. Fake deadlines are what almost everyone does online. You can decide if it bothers you enough and if so just do not do business with that company again.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031477].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ryan2008
    This is done more often than not and is used to get you to buy. Is it right?? It's kind of like those timers you see on site's and when the clock hits 0 it's says you cant buy it anymore but if you refresh the page the clock starts over again.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10031504].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
      I know many people in this thread said it's just part of the game.

      Short answer, yes it does bother me and unless the product extremely over-delivers on its promise beyond expectations (not likely or they wouldn't do it) or it's the only one in existence, I'll probably never do business with that person again. I'll always wonder what else is he lying or over exaggerating about.
      Signature
      Download "Free 80 Page E-Book"
      "201 Ways To Live Better On Less Money".
      "Because The Easiest Way To Make Money is ... ... By Saving Some First!"
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032022].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Janice Sperry
        Originally Posted by The Niche Man View Post

        I know many people in this thread said it's just part of the game.

        Short answer, yes it does bother me and unless the product extremely over-delivers on it's promise beyond expectations (not likely or they wouldn't do it) or it's the only one in existence, I'll probably never do buisness with that person again. I'll always wonder what else is he lying or over exaggerating about.
        In my earlier post I forgot to say it bothers me too!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032225].message }}
  • Also all sales are like this, just ignore the scarcity.
    Signature

    [CENTER][B]==> Do you want to make money online? [/B]
    Free video: How regular people are making 6-figures per month on the internet! [URL="http://www.clkmg.com/fc27/UDCL-IN2WF"][B]Watch this free video now![/B][/URL] <==[/CENTER]

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032351].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

    You bought a special that was never to be offered again but
    you later find the same offer.

    You bought right away to beat a deadline only to find that the deadline was fake.

    Should it really matter what the seller does with his product once
    you got value for your purchase?

    Please share your views below, thanks.

    -Ray Edwards
    Not at all. This is a sales tactic and we should be aware of this, as long as there is value in the product then there is no need to be bothered IMO.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032389].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Cleberl1
    This is just a very common trick is like some sellers saying that there's only 10 copies left of a digital product that can be sold infinite times.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032535].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author spurge0n
    Let the buyer beware. If I fell for it, it's on me.
    Signature
    BlastFollow - Free tool to auto-follow people on Twitter who share your interests.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10032575].message }}

Trending Topics