$37 vs $47 - Which converts better?

21 replies
I'm selling an ebook in the relationship niche.

Which price is the best?

I know i should test (and i will !) but i'm just looking for peoples opinions here.
#$37 #$47 #converts
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Fuentes
    IF your target audience PERCEIVES the VALUE of your product at $47, and you sell it instead for $37, then you COULD MOST LIKELY get more conversions than if you were to sell the same product to the same audience at $47, and you COULD even sell your main product more IF you upsell a supplemental product at $27 with VALUE that your target audience PERCEIVES as $17 ...

    ... AND ...

    IF your target audience PERCEIVES the VALUE of your product at $37, and you sell it instead for $47, then you COULD MOST LIKELY get more conversions IF you were to sell the same product to the same audience at $37, than if you were to sell it at $47, and you COULD even sell more of your main product IF you bundle a supplemental product at $17 with VALUE that your target audience PERCEIVES as $27 ...
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  • Profile picture of the author jamescanz
    Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

    I know i should test (and i will !) but i'm just looking for peoples opinions here.
    Look at similar products that are doing well in your market.

    What are their price points?

    If they've been around a long time...

    Then there's a good reason why they use that price.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vincent Denali
    Please don't take this the wrong way as I'm only trying to be helpful. I myself would never pay that much for an ebook. Maybe $7 to $17. If I were to jump up to the $27-$37-47 or $67 range it would need to be a video course are piece of software. I'm not familiar with the dating niche', so this might actually be an acceptable price point.

    Perhaps if you broke the content up into three separate books and sold it as a bundle, at least the perceived value would be greater so you could justify the higher sale price.
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  • Profile picture of the author Cleberl1
    I don't think this exact is science, however usually the cheaper it is the more it converts. I would try $37.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nonilol
    In most cases you better go the cheaper way.

    Sell cheaper, but sell more.
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  • Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

    I'm selling an ebook in the relationship niche.
    Which price is the best? I know i should test (and i will !) but i'm just looking for peoples opinions here.
    1. You are asking the wrong question(s) to the wrong audience.

    "How much is my eBook worth? $37? $47? More? Less?

    Or better yet,

    "How much is my sales presentation worth?" (graphics, copy, etc).

    Is the right question to ask, and you do this by split testing, and allowing your "actual target market" to vote with their wallets.

    Yes you mentioned you are going to be testing, therefore you should do that!

    Asking this type of question here, will only result in answers that may not necessarily have anything to do with what your reality will be once you test,
    or launch your product.

    Those in here saying that the cheaper price will convert better, may be right, but could also be totally wrong!

    I have seen and done too many tests where price increases actually result in better conversions.

    Having said that, as was suggested, you may be asking a bit too much for just an eBook, therefore after testing, you may find that either lowering the price may work out better, or adding extra value such as a course or audios. videos etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    All of you who are saying a cheaper price converts better...

    I've revised this to say it more politely.

    ...Do you really know what you're talking about? Do you have ACTUAL EXPERIENCE with pricing? Because I do.

    ...Or are you parroting some advice you heard?

    ...And are you sure you don't have a poverty mindset? Because it's an indication in that direction.

    I really don't care if you like what I just said or not: what I say is based on FACT.

    I've been doing this for years and the truth is: sometimes people pay more--a lot more--for what they perceive as value.

    If you have ugly acne on your face or a hereditary skin problem as I do, and someone credible puts an offer in front of you--again, credibly--saying "Here's an ebook, and for just $47 I'll explain inside how you can get rid of that ugliness in less than 48 hours"...people in that situation WILL buy. I happily pay twelve bucks for a tub of tar ointment and if you don't think that adds up, and makes $47 look insignificant over the medium term, you're mistaken.

    YOU are NOT YOUR CUSTOMER.

    From my own experience:

    I ran a 2-hour coaching call. Originally I priced it at $97. It didn't sell.

    Then I increased the price to $197. It sold a couple spots and then stalled.

    I raised the price to $297. It went berserk, became an ultra-popular offer--sometimes I would do six in a week--and became a solid money-maker and intro to me for YEARS. I made well into five figures from that offer.

    Another example, this time a training product:

    I started it at $37. It did OK.

    Then I moved it to $57. It did really well, earning $5000 one month and continuously selling.

    Then I set it at $87. This package continued to sell steadily until I shut it down, finally at a $197 price point. Again, running for YEARS.


    The fact of the matter is:

    Prices are elastic. If someone will pay $37 for something, they'll probably pay $47.

    If someone will pay $127 for a product, they'll probably pay $157.

    There are price points. You can guess where these are, but they are invisible and you can trip over them: like the difference between $37 and $67. A significant factor has to be added into your deliverables if you are going to make that jump--especially if your target market has seen the $37 offer before.

    Another example:

    On Kindle, I had some books for $0.99 and $2.99. A friend who's better at Kindle marketing told me, "Professionals expect a quality book to be priced at $7.99. Why don't you move your prices up?" I did, and my sales figures have remained pretty much the same as before.

    A higher price creates higher perceived value. There are professionals who would look at my $297 offer back when and say to themselves, "No way, it can't be that great because it only costs $297. A pro sales training program has to be at least four figures."

    The WSO section is its own little microcosm and not at all representative of life in the real world. Remember that.

    I have written a lot more and done podcasts about pricing.
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  • Profile picture of the author sweetcrabhoney18
    I'm with Jason on this one.

    You can also make two sites with both prices and do an A/B kind of thing to see what price does better.

    You can also use that big product as an upsale for a smaller product.

    Best of luck.
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    • Profile picture of the author Complex
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Complex View Post

        Why do you want opinion? Opinions inject bias. Bias taints tests. Especially in a forum where you have folks positioning themselves as "the" expert.
        Asking for opinions IS a test. Asking experts for opinions - even self-proclaimed ones - is usually better than asking random people on the street.

        Folks are marketing to you in this very thread. They may not be selling you on a product or service, but they are marketing a point-of-view ... the one they think is right ... which just always happens to be ... theirs.
        Like, for example, that testing is the answer and bias is to be avoided. Just sayin'.

        Prices are basically pulled out of your arse anyway. There is no "should" price for anything. Your product is worth what people will pay for it. You want three things.

        1. Your customer has the money you want to be paid
        2. Your customer wants your product more than they want that money
        3. Your customer will be happy enough with the product to let you keep the money.

        Now, look carefully at #2 and #3. Those are bias. Those are places where you can exploit people's existing mindset, and the failures of the human brain to process information WITHOUT bias.

        Marketers live and breathe bias. It's what we do. We tell lies for a living. If you have a problem with that, you might be in the wrong business.
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  • Profile picture of the author yiotis
    You can always attract people if you put a sale on it. You can say from
    $47 now 10% sale take it at $37 for a limited time
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  • Profile picture of the author ContentPro22
    Nobody can answer that. Just test and see which converts better. That's all you can do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rory Singh
    $47 sounds more better to me. $37 feels like something that your hoping to get more sales with because it's cheaper.

    As the others said above, the higher the price, the more it is 'perceived' as valuable.
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  • Profile picture of the author RonBartling
    Neither may be the correct answer. You won't know until you test with live traffic to potential customers. People lie in surveys about what they would pay, not necessarily intentionally. Until they are presented with an actual offer and an opportunity to buy they don't really know what they would pay.
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  • Profile picture of the author rosario1990
    Of course $47 better than $37. Now what do you think about this rate?
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Another option is to sell the product at both price points, with the $47 version having a lot of added value so it has a higher perceived value at $47 than the $37 version has. In this example, the entire purpose of the $37 version from a marketing perspective is to make the $47 version look like a great deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author stavroscanlon128
    It depends my man! But I would start by asking yourself a few more questions. Such as:

    What are your competitors charging?

    If I were you I would either charge way less than your competition, or way more...if you can think up an angle to get away with it that is
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    Originally Posted by Zac The Man View Post

    I'm selling an ebook in the relationship niche.

    Which price is the best?

    I know i should test (and i will !) but i'm just looking for peoples opinions here.
    Imo it depends on the value of your product, it's it's worth $47 and you can convince people to pay that, then change $47.
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  • Profile picture of the author Xochitl Shat
    In my opinion 47$ is more better than 37$. It cost less but sell much.
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  • Profile picture of the author jordantyj
    $47 is the better way to go. It's also inviting for some reason, even though it's $10 more. Depending on how you promote it, the niche you are in will benefit from it as it will help them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jennifer Hutson
    There is no concrete answer. It all depends on the perceived value by your audience and how well you explained the benefits in your copy. You really need to split test the two prices in order to find out for sure.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mrnace
    Can you split test this?
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