Big ticket affiliate marketing - advice?

10 replies
Hello,

I'm a beginner wishing to start making income from affiliate marketing, and I thought I'd target the affluent buyer market.
What I'm not sure about is:
1) Is this a good market to target for a beginner?
2) Is it possible to create sales without having reviews? I can't afford to test private jets or buy designer glasses every week, but what I can do is provide overviews and comparisons.
3) From what I saw, methods for creating authoritative sites are usually targeted towards the average-buyer marketing. I'm not really sure if the same methods (backlinks, guest posts, forum posts) would work with the big ticket crowd.
Can anyone with some experience advise on this matter?
#advice #affiliate #big #marketing #ticket
  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    It's "not a bad idea" for anyone. And I'll tell you why.

    Take me for example. Let's say you're promoting products to me.

    1. Product is a free membership to SWTOR. Pays you $2.25 commission.
    2. Product is a condo in Miami. Pays you $5,000.

    If I'm in the market for both, literally in the market and ready to take action, then you have pretty much the same chance of landing me on either offer. Your approach in both cases will just be different. If I'm to take action on a high-ticket option, I need to trust and value whoever is promoting it. A newbie can learn it, but it's harder than promoting low-tickets.

    Now, I said "not a bad idea."

    It depends on the offer. In other words: the offer dictates the difficulty. As anyone who's ever done Amazon will tell you, when it boils down to it, getting a TV sale is really no different than getting a DVD sale. But the same rules don't always apply (like my example of a condo, which would usually require getting your prospects to trust you and your opinion).

    To make life easier on yourself?

    Get started by promoting free join offers (PPL, Pay Per Lead) on offers that have high network EPCs and you know something about.

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by redshirtguy View Post

    Hello,

    I'm a beginner . . . and I thought I'd target the affluent buyer market.

    There is no market for affluent buyers. Having money and being a buyer are demographics that could be descriptive of consumers in any market.

    Focus on your subject or marketplace. What is it you're trying to sell?

    Go to Amazon and look at their index. They sell thousands of "things." You won't find "affluent buyers" as a market.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author redshirtguy
      Thanks for the advice, Tom, I'll look into it.

      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      There is no market for affluent buyers. Having money and being a buyer are demographics that could be descriptive of consumers in any market.

      Focus on your subject or marketplace. What is it you're trying to sell?

      Go to Amazon and look at their index. They sell thousands of "things." You won't find "affluent buyers" as a market.

      Steve
      What I meant was luxury items/things that people usually buy due to brand image. Having money is descriptive of consumers in any market, but having lots of money and being willing to spend it without care on things that have no advantage over the alternatives (besides a logo/associated prestige) is not.
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve B
        Originally Posted by redshirtguy View Post

        . . . having lots of money and being willing to spend it without care on things that have no advantage over the alternatives (besides a logo/associated prestige) is not.

        Redshirtguy,

        I understand what you're saying, but I don't think you're looking at this from a marketer's perspective.

        Let me ask you . . . just how do you identify people in this group: "having lots of money and being willing to spend it without care on things that have no advantage over the alternatives"? What are they buying? Do they all have the same common problem or desire? No they don't.

        Other than the fact that they have a large disposable income, there is nothing that segregates them as an audience that is looking for a service, product, a solution, or a common desire. And if there's nothing that brings them together into a homogeneous audience, then how do you
        1. find them in one place so you can market to them?
        2. appeal to their common need/want/desire?
        3. present them with an offer that is targeted just to their group?
        The fact that they are affluent gives you no clue as to what kind of offer they will respond to. I can tell you from my own marketing experience that rich people are typically savvy shoppers. They don't just spend their money on everything that comes along, as you have said, "without care." They scrutinize and differentiate just as well, if not more so, than other consumers.


        I'm not trying to dissuade you from moving forward. I'm trying to help you (isn't that what you asked for?) and I can tell you that focusing on an audience that is affluent is not the best approach. Focus on the demand in the marketplace so you can identify a group of people (an audience) that are looking for a solution to a problem, a personal desire, a need, a want. Focus on the subject of the demand, not the demographics of the audience because you are trying to sell them to meet that demand.


        Does that make sense to you?


        Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author RyanJohnson1
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      There is no market for affluent buyers. Having money and being a buyer are demographics that could be descriptive of consumers in any market.

      Focus on your subject or marketplace. What is it you're trying to sell?

      Go to Amazon and look at their index. They sell thousands of "things." You won't find "affluent buyers" as a market.

      Steve
      Since there are not affluent buyers, i guess that's why Dan Kennedy, the godfather of direct response marketing as we know it, wasted months of his life to write a book called "No B.S. Marketing To The Affluent"...

      I agree it's harder to identify people who are affluent buyers without first identifying your market is true...however I won't concede to the fact that you can't identify who the affluent buyers are in a market, when there are groups of people who ONLY buy premium products.
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  • Profile picture of the author redshirtguy
    Steve B, (thanks for the reply, too)

    Do they all have the same common problem or desire? No they don't.
    I don't think that you can ever find groups as homogeneous outside of cults. My point was that instead of them all having the same problem that can be matched with a single offer, they want to spend money on products that are meant for high-income audiences. They want goods from recognizable brands and they want high-quality service.

    I can tell you from my own marketing experience that rich people are typically savvy shoppers. They don't just spend their money on everything that comes along, as you have said, "without care." They scrutinize and differentiate just as well, if not more so, than other consumers.
    I would say "savvy" is a subjective term here. They are certainly not savvy enough to notice that they are paying a premium for (almost always) something of completely imaginary value, i.e. a brand's image. That they can be picky about it, I don't doubt.
    In any case, I'm not trying to find exploitable/gullible rich people, so it doesn't matter. My calculations were based purely off of the prices involved multiplied by commission percent.

    I'm not trying to dissuade you from moving forward. I'm trying to help you (isn't that what you asked for?) and I can tell you that focusing on an audience that is affluent is not the best approach. Focus on the demand in the marketplace so you can identify a group of people (an audience) that are looking for a solution to a problem, a personal desire, a need, a want. Focus on the subject of the demand, not the demographics of the audience because you are trying to sell them to meet that demand.


    Does that make sense to you?
    Sure, that makes a lot of sense. I'm not sure if I gave the impression that I was disregarding advice, I am taking all of it into consideration.

    On the topic of demand, I am not really sure how to best approach the research when it comes to big ticket items. From what I gathered though, there is a lot of information about various products scattered around, but not much consolidated, sales-pitch-free content. This doesn't mean that there is a demand for it, though, so I could use some advice on how to check this.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    The same way you sell to regular buyers and rich people is no different. If they like it, they'll buy it. If they have the money for it, they'll buy it. If they don't have the money for it, they'll still buy it - because they make $10,000 a day from the business(es) that they already have. You can target whoever you want.... are you patient enough to wait 6 months for your first $1,000 affiliate commission? Do you have the advertising funds to firmly push a campaign that can get you regular $1,000 affiliate commissions?
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  • Profile picture of the author redshirtguy
    Waiting to build up momentum is fine. As for a campaign, depends on what sort of funds we're talking about.
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    Why as a begginner would you want to make things harder than they need to be on yourself?

    I have been doing affiliate/cpa marketing forever and I have zero interest in what you are talking about.

    I have always taken the path of least resistance. What do I mean by that...90%+ of everything I have marketed has been lead generation. No selling/no credit card needed, all the user has to do is fill out a form(higher conversion rates). Also, I have almost always generate leads that have mass appeal, in that it has the potential to be of interest to a decent percent of the adult population....endless supply of prospects.

    Put the two together and what does it spell...Lots of money that isn't that hard to obtain.

    Anyway, not trying to rain on your parade. Just something to think about.
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  • Profile picture of the author redshirtguy
    Thanks everyone for your replies. I will look deeper into the subject - if it's truly too hard for a beginner, I will try the proposed alternatives.
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