Advice on how to price myself as a freelancer?

42 replies
I'm getting into the world of freelance marketing/writing. I'm looking for advice on how to price my service.


I'm not sure if I would like to do an hourly rate or a flat rate per project. It would seem, an hourly rate would work out better in my favor. But a flat rate might be more appealing to clients.


I don't have a ton of experience so I don't think I can position as a premium provider.


I'm just not sure how to go about pricing my services. Any input would be greatly appreciated.


Thank you in advance.
#advice #freelancer #price
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Don't go on freelance sites. All that will do is dilute you down.

    Position yourself to maximize your expertise. Merely by focusing, ie. "I'm a writer for the oil industry" rather than "I'm a writer" will enable you to charge more.

    I hardly ever do hourly work. It seems dumb to me: why does the client care how long it takes me? Why would they want to hook themselves to a train of potentially endless or at least overrunning hours?

    What if you're good at what you do? You want to penalize yourself? A low experience person spends 10 hours on what you spend 5 or 2...should you earn less because you know more?

    Pricing based on how long it takes you to solve the problem is a bad idea, anyway. Think in terms of what you're doing for them by providing the solution. Price based on the size of the problem you're solving.

    You will get whiners. Ignore them. Able business owners are DESPERATE for competent help.
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    • Profile picture of the author san2hnl
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Don't go on freelance sites. All that will do is dilute you down.

      Position yourself to maximize your expertise. Merely by focusing, ie. "I'm a writer for the oil industry" rather than "I'm a writer" will enable you to charge more.

      I hardly ever do hourly work. It seems dumb to me: why does the client care how long it takes me? Why would they want to hook themselves to a train of potentially endless or at least overrunning hours?

      What if you're good at what you do? You want to penalize yourself? A low experience person spends 10 hours on what you spend 5 or 2...should you earn less because you know more?

      Pricing based on how long it takes you to solve the problem is a bad idea, anyway. Think in terms of what you're doing for them by providing the solution. Price based on the size of the problem you're solving.

      You will get whiners. Ignore them. Able business owners are DESPERATE for competent help.
      I respectfully disagree. Charging by the hour is the only way I can protect myself from a client who asks for endless iterations. I used to charge a flat rate on a per-project basis, but no more. My time is very important to me.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by san2hnl View Post

        I respectfully disagree. Charging by the hour is the only way I can protect myself from a client who asks for endless iterations. I used to charge a flat rate on a per-project basis, but no more. My time is very important to me.
        Why aren't you setting an up-front agreement with your clients that there are two or three revisions only, and then they will be charged again? I do.

        And funnily enough, revisions are hardly ever necessary.
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      • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
        Originally Posted by san2hnl View Post

        I respectfully disagree. Charging by the hour is the only way I can protect myself from a client who asks for endless iterations. I used to charge a flat rate on a per-project basis, but no more. My time is very important to me.
        No. It's not!!

        If you properly spec the deliverable in your contract, those "endless iterations" are additional charge items.

        Your contract should include a very specific "scope of services" or "statement of work" and one of the terms in your contract should acknowledge the potential for modifications to that original agreement and a definition of how they are to be charged for any such changes.

        In essence, provide a "quote" for those additional services up front.
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    • Profile picture of the author art72
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Don't go on freelance sites. All that will do is dilute you down.

      Position yourself to maximize your expertise. Merely by focusing, ie. "I'm a writer for the oil industry" rather than "I'm a writer" will enable you to charge more.

      I hardly ever do hourly work. It seems dumb to me: why does the client care how long it takes me? Why would they want to hook themselves to a train of potentially endless or at least overrunning hours?

      What if you're good at what you do? You want to penalize yourself? A low experience person spends 10 hours on what you spend 5 or 2...should you earn less because you know more?

      Pricing based on how long it takes you to solve the problem is a bad idea, anyway. Think in terms of what you're doing for them by providing the solution. Price based on the size of the problem you're solving.

      You will get whiners. Ignore them. Able business owners are DESPERATE for competent help.
      I agree based on my offline business (contractor services) for nearly 20 years.

      Always command your price, and avoid people seeking to 'beat you down' or profess if you start low, you can charge more later.

      That might work in theory, but im my experience, the people whom I did lower my pricing for generally 'expected' the same discounted price from there after.

      The problem with thinking start low, charge more later... can be grossly examined under the US's current job market.

      When any market becomes threatened, as were many industries (housing & construction being only one example) in the US over the past decade, we see a significant increase in costs, but a decrease in the wages paid to the 'workers'.

      In short, as an independent sub-contractor, I have directly experienced companies who 'expect' my services & prices to be cheaper as a result of rising operating costs (i.e. fuel, building materials, tools, supplies, ins's, etc...) - but in reality, those same inflated costs cause a loss for subs like me.

      To put an even lower price upon my services damages not only my own survival, and my businesses integrity... it hurts the whole of the competitor, and eventually the quality being provided.

      I believe; this works on the same principles as selling any service... Writing or edgewise.

      Lastly, concerning my dislike for the hourly option. People in my trade who worked by the hour (swimming pool construction) were lucky to earn $12 - $15 per hour. My average time to completion, based on a per job basis, was $75 - $100 per hour!

      Also, companies did not have to pay 'lazy workers' to milk jobs, or pay all the other expenses of an employee (i.e. workmans comp, uniforms, vehicle costs & ins, or tool replacement and repair.)

      Unfortunately, due to the overtones of 'FEAR' people took jobs for less pay...Oh, it'll get better..." right?

      WRONG!

      Desperation (the lie of wise) business owners convinced the 'work force' to inherit fear, a fear of losing more by not working, than that of working for less!

      My industry now pays 1/2 of what it did 20 years ago, yet costs and inflation is now 3X higher! - and companies complain they can't find good help... No wonder why, duh!

      Do not accept less than what your time is worth, command higher prices, and do not support the 'rouse' of desperation, it's a lie!

      If you are good at what you do, and as Niche Man states; know your client is making money... Sell your service as a compliment to their continued success, as opposed to destroying both yoursel, and eventually an entire market/industry as I have witnessed offline!

      I have the same desire to write, and make money writing, I personally write for my future audience, for lack of experience, and low paying gigs will not help my desired reputation, no matter "How bad I need money!"

      Best of Luck!
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    • Profile picture of the author onehalf
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Don't go on freelance sites. All that will do is dilute you down.

      Position yourself to maximize your expertise. Merely by focusing, ie. "I'm a writer for the oil industry" rather than "I'm a writer" will enable you to charge more.

      I hardly ever do hourly work. It seems dumb to me: why does the client care how long it takes me? Why would they want to hook themselves to a train of potentially endless or at least overrunning hours?

      What if you're good at what you do? You want to penalize yourself? A low experience person spends 10 hours on what you spend 5 or 2...should you earn less because you know more?

      Pricing based on how long it takes you to solve the problem is a bad idea, anyway. Think in terms of what you're doing for them by providing the solution. Price based on the size of the problem you're solving.

      You will get whiners. Ignore them. Able business owners are DESPERATE for competent help.
      I totally agree. You must position yourself as expert in writing in a particular industry to fully maximize your expertise and be able to set a decent asking price for your service.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Do you know what your writing is used by your clients for and how much
    they make using your writing? Then price yourself from that.

    If you are providing value ot your clients then you should share in the returns.

    -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Well I like flat rates, and in my ebook consulting business, I use flat rates. Pick a price and see if it gets you clients. If it does, cool. If not, test price by pricing it higher, or pricing it lower. See which one works best for you. And sell your services on your own site too. You can demand more. Plus you have to demonstrate some credibility too.

    To make it easy, sell a simple ebook about content creation and writing, and make your writing services your backend (or next product). Who better to buy your services from you than your customers who have bought your ebook about "article writing" or "content writing"?
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  • Profile picture of the author williamstout
    I would prefer you to do fixed rate projects as they tend to pay more despite doing the work which takes less time to complete. I would also recommend that you specialize in one or two niches to provide better service and content and express yourself as an specialist to the client.
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  • Profile picture of the author focusedlife
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  • Profile picture of the author createyouwealth
    I would simply price it depending
    Upon how hard the task is and
    How long it takes you to complete
    The task.

    Also if you are freelancing and it
    Can easily be outsourced I would
    Just outsource the task to make
    It even easier for you.

    All the best!
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    Hourly rate is NOT the way to go. Most customers prefer to know how much the job costs before you start. I always get paid up front. If somebody refuses to do this, I politely suggest they find a writer who may best serve their needs in this area. A flat rate is good because I get the money and know what I am earning...without the stress of calculating hours. Some jobs take longer than others and that can be factored into the total price. Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author tuhinindia1971
    Originally Posted by wheelstb View Post

    I'm getting into the world of freelance marketing/writing. I'm looking for advice on how to price my service.
    I'm not sure if I would like to do an hourly rate or a flat rate per project. It would seem, an hourly rate would work out better in my favor. But a flat rate might be more appealing to clients.
    I don't have a ton of experience so I don't think I can position as a premium provider.
    I'm just not sure how to go about pricing my services. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you in advance.
    Well, as you are a new freelancer & you do not enough experience & you do not tell me about your region, so you can set your hourly rate is $3.00 per hour. Start your work by the small rate. After completing some works, you will get some feedback, then you will be able to increase your hourly rate. In case of fixed price job, you need to calculate how much time you may need to do the work, then you will tell how much money you want to complete the project. Thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author DeePower
      "$3 an hour"?? You're kidding right?

      Dee
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        $3.00 per hour
        I guess that expectation is what keeps Fiverr chugging along. Do people really live on $3/hr?

        Unbelievable.
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        • People think all words are created equal.

          So if 100 words at $50 takes an hour, then 200 words at $25 takes 15 minutes, hey, and while you're at it, willya look in on this email I wrote and fix up my son's essay for college?

          Bottom line is: what can I fix for you that you can't fix for yourself?
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  • Profile picture of the author sweetcrabhoney18
    My way of quoting a price ...

    Amount $ per hour x time it will take
    Then I add to that
    Length of project ( I.e Word count ) x per word cost

    I provide the client with a set due date and a set fixed price.

    By knowing my own per hour rate I know what my time is WORTH but I don't have to share it with the whole world if I don't want to.

    If I'm in a rush I go with a set per word price and move on.

    Starting off on freelance bid sites is a nice idea but build a website first. And make sure your website is sexy. At least this will push you ahead of the rookies who have no samples of their work.

    The idea however is to get offline clients locally and offer your services to aid those in the community. One thing I did to build my brand near my area was call a bunch of non profits and also some Meet Up groups and offer to write them a brochure or newsletter for free. They began to refer me to their friends and family.

    I write fiction mostly these days but the method still works.

    The most important piece of advice I can give you is keep moving forward ... it's not easy to be a freelancer but with hard work comes success. Never give up just because it's hard. And be willing and ready to learn along the way.

    Best of luck!
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    keep moving forward

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  • Profile picture of the author art72
    Jeezus help me... accepting $3 per hour, and I thought my offline trade was currupt!

    I mean maybe in another country, that's significantly more, as I am aware of sites in the philipines that skilled workers will devote full time employment for a month, at less than what we consider enough to survive on per week.

    And still... I say; contract by the job!!!

    Not the hour!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jacebeeny50
    Jason had some really good tips in his post for sure.

    My $.02 is that your services are always perceived as worth more until they are actually done. A client of mine was always happy to pay 2-3k for a website until I was actually done with it because then it "looked" easy to do. So get paid upfront or at least a good percentage of it upfront to help protect yourself from people trying to discount your services after you are done.
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  • Profile picture of the author tdadkins
    I would price it out piece by piece. Hourly doesnt make a lot of sense for this type of work. Like others have stated it depends on length of the work, the topics it covers etc. It is exciting to be a freelance worker though!
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  • Profile picture of the author allegandro
    Pricing, when I just think about it, I cost me a headache.

    I had the same problems and it kept me awake for months.

    I would recommend you for sure to google pricing strategies, because wrong pricing can cost you a fortune.
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  • Profile picture of the author usmantech
    Never underprice yourself. But initially you will have to underprice yoruself. Thats the dilemma. But do not keep doing the donkey work always.. Quickly raise your prices once you establish a little bit of confidence in your products and services.
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  • Profile picture of the author Platt
    I advice you to do a flat rate according to topics or depth of the subject. But don't do it per hour because that won't attract anyone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Yvon Boulianne
    Ok and i'll say it again as it's SO important
    you have to specialize yourself, find a nich you love
    Writer for medical field
    writer for toys review
    but DON'T BE ANOTHER GENERAL WRITER as it's a bit lost of energy

    Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author trickspassion
    I'm working on fiverr
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  • Profile picture of the author Nico Puegher
    Originally Posted by wheelstb View Post

    I'm getting into the world of freelance marketing/writing. I'm looking for advice on how to price my service.


    I'm not sure if I would like to do an hourly rate or a flat rate per project. It would seem, an hourly rate would work out better in my favor. But a flat rate might be more appealing to clients.


    I don't have a ton of experience so I don't think I can position as a premium provider.


    I'm just not sure how to go about pricing my services. Any input would be greatly appreciated.


    Thank you in advance.
    Freelancers site are good to start with, I made money on that. Once you have some clients and reputation you can make your own website and clients will come.

    The best way to start is a fixed price, then you can move out to hourly based. Try Freelancer or Upwork, maybe Fiverr, make a few jobs, new clients and build your reputation.

    It won't be easy to find those first clients, don't give up and you'll get it.
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  • Profile picture of the author ElizabethArling
    I can't agree more that being a professional writer in one or few industries is the best way to start with. Learn something, not necessarily profoundly. And freelance writing is also great as you can learn a lot! That is what I like the most about it. Once you gain more experience, you can change your price and show the SAMPLES of your work proving what you're worth. Afterwards you can start your own blog, or write a book if you want or promote your writing and develop in other spheres! I know many people who have started on elance and I would not recommend anyone to do so. The system can simply force you underestimate yourself. I would recommend to start from the websites like writology.com as there is a possibility to set your own prices and show the samples of your work. If I`m not mistaken, you can also check other writers' prices and their samples as well. this way you can compare yourself to others and see what you're worth. And I completely hate the hourly work and agree with Mr. Kanigan that it is stupid and very often groundless.
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  • Profile picture of the author adongmanila
    In the Upwork, you will see both Fixed price & Hourly job available. You should start with a minimum rate firstly. After completing some works & getting some Feedback & having some sample / previous work report, you will increase your rate gradually. on the other hand Fixed price job, you will need to ask the rate first by calculating yourself how much time may need to complete the project. Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author akd545
    I have bid on projects on Upwork, Elance and Guru. I found that around $1/100 words worked well for me. i always preferred packaged article deals vs. Hourly rates. But to each his own which ever works better for the individual. We all have different skill levels as writers.
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  • Profile picture of the author PhilippaWrites
    I generally prefer to work on a per-project basis, though I do have a couple of clients who I work with on an hourly basis.

    The benefit of per-project is that you can price based on the value you offer, rather than the work you do. If you work with someone on an hourly basis then you get better, you speed up, and you end up being paid less per piece of work!
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    Here's one piece of advice YOU NEED to listen to

    Regardless of what price you are thinking of, always remember: Raising your prices once you've started at very low rates will almost always tarnish your brand.

    Don't engage in a race to the bottom.

    Focus on producing a high quality portfolio and people who are willing to pay TOP DOLLAR will step up.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

      Here's one piece of advice YOU NEED to listen to

      Regardless of what price you are thinking of, always remember: Raising your prices once you've started at very low rates will almost always tarnish your brand.

      Don't engage in a race to the bottom.

      Focus on producing a high quality portfolio and people who are willing to pay TOP DOLLAR will step up.
      Agreed. Start at a level closer to where you want to end up.

      The problem with starting low is you get branded by it. Buyers who have been following you see the leap: "Well he started that low; why is he suddenly pricing his services so high? After all, I know they sold for just $X a few months ago..." And you created that problem yourself!

      Customers do exist right now who will pay the higher rates. And by pricing yourself low, you're actually screening yourself off their list because they believe low prices mean low quality.

      And I saw someone earlier say you have to provide samples. No, you don't. The quality of the questions you ask will demonstrate your knowledge and ability to solve the prospect's problem. And you can do this with your copy.

      There are other ways to sell than the ONE way the majority uses (because they don't know any better.) Take job hunting. You use a resume and cover letter, horribly outdated job hunting technology, because you don't know any better--and where does that get you? Throwing a blizzard of paper into an uncaring universe, exhausted from the effort, and competing with thousands of other candidates for the same few jobs. Meanwhile, I get on the radar of a few targeted employers--who I don't care whether they have a current opening or not--and get a custom-made role without any competition.

      Start thinking about how you can do the same thing with your freelancer profile. Add to that how can you arrive like no one else the way Carlos (focusedlife) talks about. Then you'll begin truly standing out. And standing out is the first step in getting hired--in any profession or marketplace.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kherk Roldan
    If you charge by the hour, it will only be natural for you to work less efficiently than if you had priced on a per job basis. And given that you only have a certain number of hours available in the day, you are essentially capping your maximum earning potential. You can of course raise your hourly rates, but you will still only have the same number of hours to work with (literally and figuratively).
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  • Profile picture of the author aznsparks
    Make a portfolio website. On freelance sites you're competing with low-skilled workers when you start (and without samples, the hiring managers can't tell that you may be better), since you can't get high-paying jobs initially. I would definitely build up that portfolio, no better proof of your skill than prior work.
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  • Profile picture of the author kimanierick
    you said you are new in the area of freelancing.. the best thing to do is first charge lower rates to gain trust and experience. through this you will build your portfolio and it will market you if you are good. Then you can raise your charges according to the task and amount of time needed to do that task. But please never let anyone misuse you because you have let experience and do show desperation. people will value you according to how you value yourself. ALL THE BEST
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by kimanierick View Post

      you said you are new in the area of freelancing.. the best thing to do is first charge lower rates to gain trust and experience. through this you will build your portfolio and it will market you if you are good. Then you can raise your charges according to the task and amount of time needed to do that task. But please never let anyone misuse you because you have let experience and do show desperation. people will value you according to how you value yourself. ALL THE BEST
      Love how COMPLETELY contradictory advice follows from one post to another here.

      Scaredy-cat pricing is the hallmark of someone who DOESN'T believe in themselves!

      Why should quality clients value you, which you say is most important, if you don't value yourself?

      Here is the flaw in everybody's thinking who believes you have to charge low to get clients:

      You have a scarcity mindset.

      You think there is only so much work out there, and you have to struggle to get it.

      That's because you don't know how to position yourself.

      There are whole other layers, like an onion, of buyers and marketplaces out there you can't see right now because you have no idea they exist!

      Play in the little leagues and you'll stay there...the big leaguers won't let you near their stuff.

      Start out at the level you feel you deserve. Immediately. Position yourself to be the obvious choice. The right level of buyer will see you.
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  • Profile picture of the author MelanieLM
    I'm in the process of building my website to get away from the freelancer sites, and pricing is a headache. I've actually searched up some of my future competition and saw how they price things. Although the range is huge (anywhere from $5.00 to $200.00 for a 500w article, for example) it gave me some idea of what's out there.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by MelanieLM View Post

      I'm in the process of building my website to get away from the freelancer sites, and pricing is a headache. I've actually searched up some of my future competition and saw how they price things. Although the range is huge (anywhere from $5.00 to $200.00 for a 500w article, for example) it gave me some idea of what's out there.
      Right. Then you should have two takeaways from your research:

      1. People don't know much about pricing

      and

      2. There's a range because there are customers at every level.

      Which level would you rather be working at?

      The answer is entirely about your comfort zone--not the market, not the buyers. They already have a comfort zone. The question is: Where will you fit yourself in? They are not doing it to you. You're doing it to yourself.

      If you really want to understand Price, start here.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jake Sacks
    If you have any writing samples make sure you post them and make sure they are good.


    Position yourself as an authority on specific subjects, not a jack of all trades. You will be fighting to get paid pennies for some articles.


    Medical writing is very lucrative, but you must know what you are talking about.
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  • Profile picture of the author napoleonfirst
    My advice is that you need to research your competition and adjust your price accordingly.
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