Do you know who have 99% conversion rate ?

26 replies
Do you know who have 99% conversion rate ? The people who get the money they want 99% of the time ?

They are Armed robbers... They point a gun at the cashier ,and take the money they want. Out of 100 cashiers , 99 will pay.

Obviously , because they are pointing a gun to his face. They wouldn't get the money if they made him a nice offer.

My point is , people are more responsive to fear and pain than benefits.

For example , if you are selling a fat loss product , people will be more responsive if you mentioned the health risks of obesity and how you can solve this problem. More than mentioning benefits of being lean.
And that's true..Obese people will not get out of the couch until they develop health conditions. They will accept any price ,diet or exercise to save their lives. They didn't care about looking good for years..

And I'd go more and say you should make the pain and fear vivid. If the robber put the gun in his pocket and told the cashier "I have a gun" . The cashier won't respond..until he sees it.

I am just thinking out loud. I see all marketers emphasize on benefits and ignoring pain and fear factor.

Sorry about using a violent example . But there is no other example that would make my point.
#99% #conversion #rate
  • Profile picture of the author tacitinc
    There is a reason they ignore fear factor - and that is not once during any bank robbery has the person who has a gun held to their face, stopped and offered the Gunman $75 for his new sneakers because they had just been looking for them the other day...

    Fear can however be used in the funnel - and that is creating a sense of urgency, based upon the fear that the offer will expire / raise in price / etc.
    So those types of fear related tactics can be quite successful - but scaring people into buying by exploiting pain or fear, isnt going to get you very far.

    Unless of course your niche is exclusively in the Halloween category... that might be the only exception lol

    Great post though - i totally see where your going
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Yes, avoiding near-future pain is a far greater motivator than any of the other three possibilities:

    > far-future pain
    > near-future benefit
    > far-future benefit.

    You can think of these as quadrants on a graph if that's helpful.

    What you have to do as a marketer is to hook these pain points up with the reality your prospect agrees they are experiencing.

    You can jump up and down hollering about health risks as much as you like, but if your prospect doesn't acknowledge their state of dangerous overweight, you're wasting your time.

    Regarding your example of the gun having to be visible to be effective, though, I have to say I think that's not true. There are many incidents where the robber has merely passed a note saying he has a gun, or had something under a handkerchief he said was a pistol.

    Stepping back, though, the teller definitely fits the pain point. They're in a known environment for robberies, and only a daft bank employee would go Full Pollyanna and believe they'd never be in danger of being robbed. So the implication of the existence of a weapon is sufficient and effective to begin making the "sale."

    Want to be truly effective? Get your target market to provide the pain points...in their own words...and repeat these words and phrases to them in the copy.
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    • Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Want to be truly effective? Get your target market to provide the pain points...in their own words...and repeat these words and phrases to them in the copy.
      Deadliest weapon we got is a mirror.

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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    Do you know who have 99% conversion rate ? The people who get the money they want 99% of the time ?
    Drug dealers do even better.
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    All The Real Marketers Are Gone. There's Nothing Left But Weak, Sniveling Wanna-Bees!
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    • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
      Originally Posted by Brent Stangel View Post

      Drug dealers do even better.
      Beautiful prostitutes in Vegas might do even better than that.
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  • Profile picture of the author @tjr
    Factor in how many armed robberies end with an arrest, and that conversion rate seems to matter just a little less.
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    • Profile picture of the author Egyfitness
      Originally Posted by @tjr View Post

      Factor in how many armed robberies end with an arrest, and that conversion rate seems to matter just a little less.
      As long as we are not doing anything illegal , that becomes irrelevant.
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      • Profile picture of the author @tjr
        Originally Posted by Egyfitness View Post

        As long as we are not doing anything illegal , that becomes irrelevant.
        Uh uh uh sweetie, you don't get to pick and choose how far your metaphor goes. You made it, now live with it.
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    • Profile picture of the author SunilTanna
      The reason people are fat is because eating a cake NOW is more important to them than being obese/high-blood pressure/diabetic/etc., in months or years time.

      To the extent that armed robbers are effective (I'm not sure it's 99%) it's because of the threat of IMMEDIATE consequences.

      I'm doubtful fear will convert, unless associated with a sense of urgency.

      Here's another example: Some priests, who presumably believe in God, heaven & hell, etc., sometimes commit heinous acts, despite the worst possible threat (an eternity in hell) being held over their heads... simply because the threat isn't imminent.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    If fear is that powerful how come every smoker knows by heart what
    is written on each pack of cigarette, yet continues to smoke?

    I'm wondering if the love for smoking is greater than the fear of
    contracting a terrible disease? So is love stronger than fear?
    Would someone do more for you if they think you love them
    than if they were afraid of the consequences of not getting what
    you are offering?

    Just thinking out loud.

    -Ray Edwards
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    • Profile picture of the author Egyfitness
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      If fear is that powerful how come every smoker knows by heart what
      is written on each pack of cigarette, yet continues to smoke?

      I'm wondering if the love for smoking is greater than the fear of
      contracting a terrible disease? So is love stronger than fear?
      Would someone do more for you if they think you love them
      than if they were afraid of the consequences of not getting what
      you are offering?

      Just thinking out loud.

      -Ray Edwards
      I think someone running from a lion will be10x faster than running after his dream girl

      Seriously though , people who try to quit smoking are motivated by fear of death than anything else. And I think smoking is physiological addiction (to nicotine) anyways. So it is a big battle between addiction and fear , not just (love) of smoking
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    • Profile picture of the author Egyfitness
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      If fear is that powerful how come every smoker knows by heart what
      is written on each pack of cigarette, yet continues to smoke?

      I'm wondering if the love for smoking is greater than the fear of
      contracting a terrible disease? So is love stronger than fear?
      Would someone do more for you if they think you love them
      than if they were afraid of the consequences of not getting what
      you are offering?

      Just thinking out loud.

      -Ray Edwards
      A little relevant story to your post. I wouldn't give my car to my newbie driver wife in fear she will crash it. But I handed the same car to hijackers who raised an Ak-47 over my head. (true story..look at my country)
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      If fear is that powerful how come every smoker knows by heart what
      is written on each pack of cigarette, yet continues to smoke?

      I'm wondering if the love for smoking is greater than the fear of
      contracting a terrible disease? So is love stronger than fear?
      Would someone do more for you if they think you love them
      than if they were afraid of the consequences of not getting what
      you are offering?

      Just thinking out loud.

      -Ray Edwards
      "It can't happen to me. It hasn't, so it won't, it's out of my mind..."

      And the addictive effects of the product override fear.

      It's far-future pain, too. Not near-future.

      Near-future benefit ("Gosh this cig tastes so good") is stronger than far-future pain.
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    • Profile picture of the author quadagon
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      If fear is that powerful how come every smoker knows by heart what
      is written on each pack of cigarette, yet continues to smoke?

      I'm wondering if the love for smoking is greater than the fear of
      contracting a terrible disease? So is love stronger than fear?
      Would someone do more for you if they think you love them
      than if they were afraid of the consequences of not getting what
      you are offering?

      Just thinking out loud.

      -Ray Edwards
      One of the issues with smoking campaigns is that the claims they make can't be specific. The claims are to general and abstract which is a shame as the reptilian brain responds to specifics.

      If cigarette boxes said 'You will get cancer if you smoke 10 cigarettes' then that would be more powerful because its specific.

      I spoke to an anti smoking company in the UK about how to use neuroscience to decrease smoking.

      Specific fear is important addition to the op's point as general fear isn't a motivater. Now to really take advantage you'll want to tie this into Maslow's hierarchy of needs and see how you can position yourself and your offering.

      Someone mentioned weight loss and health benefits, it is was me I'd probably focus on less sex and being ignored by potential partners.

      Now I'm not saying love isn't a factor but you can combine the two. Look at adverts for bleach, cleaning products and 4x4's for how they combine protecting a child with fear.
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      • Profile picture of the author TheGMa
        Originally Posted by quadagon View Post


        If cigarette boxes said 'You will get cancer if you smoke 10 cigarettes' then that would be more powerful because its specific.
        I agree with quadagon on the above, and Jason Kanigan below:

        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan: 10375353

        Yes, avoiding near-future pain is a far greater motivator than any of the other three possibilities:

        > far-future pain
        > near-future benefit
        > far-future benefit.

        You can think of these as quadrants on a graph if that's helpful.[
        For instance, if you have a weight loss blog or site, you can warn about obesity by making a list of the miseries and frustrations a diabetic has to live with. 10-1 your viewers will either already be experiencing the above or know someone who is and is in denial.

        Let me tell you - living with diabetes is extremely frustrating, it's a cotton' pickin' roller coaster, and it's damn scary when you start losing things like stamina and eyesight and the ability to think straight 'cause your blood sugar is off or you've been on insulin for friggin' ever. And the list goes on.

        Now you can offer the near-future and far-future benefits of whatever your pushing. But you'd better do your homework to get it right.

        - Annie
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  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Originally Posted by Egyfitness View Post


    My point is , people are more responsive to fear and pain than benefits.

    For example , if you are selling a fat loss product , people will be more responsive if you mentioned the health risks of obesity and how you can solve this problem. More than mentioning benefits of being lean.
    And that's true..Obese people will not get out of the couch until they develop health conditions. They will accept any price ,diet or exercise to save their lives. They didn't care about looking good for years..
    I remember former Warrior Alexa Smith used to talk about this incessantly to me, in Posts and PMs.

    She said by far she had done much better in Passion and Hobby Niches than Niches that were related to Health and other problems that people were faced with or trying to overcome. ( and that dealt with a certain amount of fear and pain)

    I personally tend to agree with her on the most part


    - Robert Andrew
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    • Profile picture of the author kilgore
      Originally Posted by discrat View Post

      I remember former Warrior Alexa Smith used to talk about this incessantly to me, in Posts and PMs.

      She said by far she had done much better in Passion and Hobby Niches than Niches that were related to Health and other problems that people were faced with or trying to overcome. ( and that dealt with a certain amount of fear and pain)
      I totally agree with you (and Alexa) there. Fear can make you buy once, but it's not a good way to get repeat customers. If their fear comes to fruition, then it's your fault, so why should they buy from you again? If it doesn't, you've already solved their problem, so they obviously don't need you anymore.

      With hobbies, people are buying things that they care about, that make them happy, that they love. And because of that they're likely to buy them over and over and over again.

      Think about it this way: if you're buying a gun for protection, one is probably all you need. But if you're a gun collector, you'll never have enough.

      You can create a business without repeat customers, but it's really, really hard. So for my money, I'd rather find a way to market to people so that they buy from me over and over again.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by Egyfitness View Post

    My point is , people are more responsive to fear and pain than benefits.

    Sometimes yes . . . often no.

    Blanket statements like this only reveal your focus on one motivating factor out of many that influence consumers to make a purchase.

    As an online marketer, you will crash and burn quickly if all you ever do is stress the fear and pain that will come to the prospect if he doesn't respond to your offer. You will soon be seen as a "doomsday monger" and a constant bearer of bad news to the point that no one will trust or believe what you say.

    You remember the story of Chicken Little, don't you?

    I remember a marketer that often came to the Warrior Forum a number of years ago and it seemed that every time he posted he was warning Warriors about "the end of this or that" marketing technique. He sold his products in the same way . . . scaring people into thinking that if they didn't join his list and buy his products today they would miss out forever.

    Fear and pain can be motivators . . . but to say they are always more powerful than a good explanation of benefits is to ignore all the other dozens of motivating techniques that can all prove successful at one time or another in a compelling offer.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post


      I remember a marketer that often came to the Warrior Forum a number of years ago and it seemed that every time he posted he was warning Warriors about "the end of this or that" marketing technique. He sold his products in the same way . . . scaring people into thinking that if they didn't join his list and buy his products today they would miss out forever.

      Fear and pain can be motivators . . .

      Steve
      I know its not the same guy but here is a recent good example of trying to scare people into buying

      DO NOT close this page.
      not aff. link
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  • Profile picture of the author sansui
    You have made a good point.
    Sometimes people will only act out of fear.

    The fear of something bad going to happen will
    take them out of their comfort zone and make
    an attempt to put it right.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex65
    Nice thread!
    I do not think that people do things for fear that for convenience.
    That is if I want to stop smoking a person 50 years I will try to put fear in him, but if I do the same thing with a guy 20 years I'll have to try to convince him of the benefits that will stop smoking during our ... life even our fears change
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  • Profile picture of the author brookechloe
    Mind Blowing. I was thinking, its video script.
    I see. Salute your way to express theme and example.
    Cheers and keep going!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      An acquaintance of mine sells home fire and security systems. Here's his marketing plan...
      Scan the local papers and news outlets for reports of break-ins, fires, CO poisonings, etc. Note the address.

      Blanket a radius around that address with postcards offering a free evaluation and quote.

      Respond to the inquiries.
      He says he used to do more, but found out that the best prospect for a security system is someone who has just experienced a break-in. Second best are the neighbors of people who just experienced a break-in. The same goes for the fire alarm/sprinkler systems.

      He also says that his approach works far better for him than more general "there's a home invasion every 32.4 seconds" fear mongering.

      As for the weight loss thing, I read some research that said that two events were far more effective at getting people to change:

      > A serious, personal medical event (heart attack, stroke, diabetes, etc.)
      > A radical change in relationship status (usually divorce)

      Again, these are personal events.
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      • Profile picture of the author quadagon
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        An acquaintance of mine sells home fire and security systems. Here's his marketing plan...
        Scan the local papers and news outlets for reports of break-ins, fires, CO poisonings, etc. Note the address.

        Blanket a radius around that address with postcards offering a free evaluation and quote.

        Respond to the inquiries.
        He says he used to do more, but found out that the best prospect for a security system is someone who has just experienced a break-in. Second best are the neighbors of people who just experienced a break-in. The same goes for the fire alarm/sprinkler systems.

        He also says that his approach works far better for him than more general "there's a home invasion every 32.4 seconds" fear mongering.

        As for the weight loss thing, I read some research that said that two events were far more effective at getting people to change:

        > A serious, personal medical event (heart attack, stroke, diabetes, etc.)
        > A radical change in relationship status (usually divorce)

        Again, these are personal events.
        An old neighbour of mine use to do something similar except he was a little bit more should we say proactive in drumming up business.

        He's currently a guest of Her Majesty.
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        I've got 99 problems but a niche ain't one
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  • Profile picture of the author arif456
    Once I had 100% conversion. 1 visitor, 1 Click, 1 sale :p
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