Why don't people keep their domains and hosting all in the same place?

by ED1190
31 replies
This is a question I had been meaning to ask, but never got around to it till now.

It seems like most people have their domains on sites like GoDaddy or Namecheap, and have their hosting elsewhere like Hostgator, etc.

Question is, why not have your hosting and domains all in the same place? Is there a particular reason why you should have them located separately?

Just wondering. Thanks.
#domains #hosting #people #place
  • Profile picture of the author James McAllister
    I don't know about everybody else, but for me it was just a cost thing. I haven't touched the domains in a long while, they are set to renew automatically, so it just makes sense to go wherever they are cheapest if I never need to do anything with them after the initial setup.
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeMizOne
    Originally Posted by ED1190 View Post

    This is a question I had been meaning to ask, but never got around to it till now.

    It seems like most people have their domains on sites like GoDaddy or Namecheap, and have their hosting elsewhere like Hostgator, etc.

    Question is, why not have your hosting and domains all in the same place? Is there a particular reason why you should have them located separately?

    Just wondering. Thanks.
    Could be a number of reasons, but I think it has to do with the prices. They buy cheap domains through sites like GoDaddy and NameCheap and redirect them to their host. That's at least what I do.

    I can cheap hosting at XY.com but can get cheaper domains at XX.com.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pandawdy
    Mostly it's price, but for me it's also the hosting interface. I don't know what GoDaddy uses now for their hosting interface, but a while back it wasn't Cpanel. It was like dealing with Tripod and Geocities in the 90's.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jill Carpenter
      Originally Posted by Pandawdy View Post

      Mostly it's price, but for me it's also the hosting interface. I don't know what GoDaddy uses now for their hosting interface, but a while back it wasn't Cpanel. It was like dealing with Tripod and Geocities in the 90's.
      They have some kind of cpanel now, but it still not great.

      And money wise it's just not really a good deal.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        People are guessing at an answer - but Jill ANSWERED the question.

        I've seen what can happen when hosting and domains are with the same provider - and it ain't pretty. It's rare that a host goes down permanently or for a long time span today but it used to happen more than you realize.

        It only has to happen once for you to lose money and it's easy to avoid by keeping hosting and domains with different providers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Luke Dennison
    I have a Godaddy hosting account and buy all my domains from Godaddy also.

    I do this for exactly the reason you stated. It's much easier having everything in one place.

    Nobody ever mentions this of course, because Godaddys affiliate programme is rubbish.

    Godaddy offer 40% of a sale, whereas other companies will offer upwards of $75 for a sign up.
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  • Profile picture of the author preebu
    What matters for SEO is to have different IP domain
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    • Profile picture of the author Jill Carpenter
      Keep them separate!

      Let's say you have a problem with your hosting provider, who also is the company you bought your domain from.

      If you get locked out, you likely get locked out to access from BOTH.

      If I have my domain in one place and my hosting in another and my host locks me out, I can go direct my domain to another host.

      If my domain name registrar takes my domain, I can easily to to another registrar, get a new domain, and link it to my host.

      "Don't put all your eggs in one basket" as the saying goes.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
        Originally Posted by Jill Carpenter View Post

        Keep them separate!

        Let's say you have a problem with your hosting provider, who also is the company you bought your domain from.

        If you get locked out, you likely get locked out to access from BOTH.

        If I have my domain in one place and my hosting in another and my host locks me out, I can go direct my domain to another host.

        If my domain name registrar takes my domain, I can easily to to another registrar, get a new domain, and link it to my host.

        "Don't put all your eggs in one basket" as the saying goes.
        To expound on Jill's answer, not only should you ALWAYS keep domain registrations and hosting separate, but there are a couple of other ways you can protect yourself if one of your vendors does crap out on you.

        1) Make sure you are backing up your web sites (i.e. your business assets) offsite every day, so that if you do lose your hosting somehow, you can recover within a day by repointing your domain to a new host.

        2) Make sure you are using two-factor authentication or difficult security questions to log in to your domain registration account, every time. One access by a hostile entity is all it takes to wreak havoc on your business.
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        • Profile picture of the author TheGMa
          Originally Posted by Jack Gordon View Post

          To expound on Jill's answer, not only should you ALWAYS keep domain registrations and hosting separate, but there are a couple of other ways you can protect yourself if one of your vendors does crap out on you.

          1) Make sure you are backing up your web sites (i.e. your business assets) offsite every day, so that if you do lose your hosting somehow, you can recover within a day by repointing your domain to a new host.

          2) Make sure you are using two-factor authentication or difficult security questions to log in to your domain registration account, every time. One access by a hostile entity is all it takes to wreak havoc on your business.
          Absolutely! I have an editor and design all my material on my computer with FTP upload. Site servers are secondary storage. Primary is on my 'puter with disc burn backup.

          FTP = File Transfer Protocol, and it is the system by which files are transferred back and forth between your computer and your host's server.

          Your Computer --> the FTP Client's Server ---> Your Web Host's Server

          Tell you what - take a look at these two; they are FREE and most of us who have either been around for since BG (Before Blogs) or who are screw loose fearless in the face of web site layout use one or the other:

          Core FTP - My fave and pretty much idiot proof It's the simplest, most user friendly file transfer system I've every encountered, and unlike Filezilla, it remembers stuff. You can transfer files back and forth to your heart's content. You can even schedule uploads so you can be off playing while your promos are being loaded in a drip line.

          Filezilla - another FTP client

          I even found a couple of tutorials for you:

          One from Site Ground: https://www.siteground.com/tutorials/ftp/
          One from WebMonkey: FTP for Beginners - Webmonkey

          - Annie
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      • Profile picture of the author TheGMa
        Originally Posted by Jill Carpenter View Post

        Keep them separate!

        "Don't put all your eggs in one basket" as the saying goes.
        Right on, Jill!

        As most have said, buy the domains from whoever is running a good deal and host there and elsewhere.

        I usually buy my domains @ GoDaddy, but scatter my holdings. I'd just as soon not have a problem with all my domains at once, plus hosting deals vary. Switching hosts isn't as complicated as it used to be (as much as 2 days to a week downtime back in the late 90's and early 20's), and there are several excellent hosts in the US and UK that offer painless transfers. Haven't tried them yet,.

        Aside: If you're into niche'ing, take a look at D9 in the UK. They offer unlimited hosting in the basic plan. Recommended by John Thornhill.

        - Annie
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  • Profile picture of the author greenowl123
    Jill hit the nail on the head.

    I learned that particular lesson the hard way back in 2011.

    My preferred domain registrar is Namecheap. I avoid GoDaddy, for reasons explained HERE

    I would recommend avoiding HostGator as well. They USED TO BE a reliable hosting provider, but that is no longer the case nowadays. I have been with HawkHost since 2011 and so far have had no issues with their hosting.
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    • Profile picture of the author rjd1265
      I have hosting and domains through Go Daddy for about 8 years now and never had an issue.

      But for one of my sites I have to use a private host simply because my software was built on that host and to have Go Daddy host it would be like $200 a month.

      The eggs in one basket thing is applicable to almost all things in life but not sure it really fits in here.

      If you don't have a domain, you can have a site. If you don't have hosting, you cant have a site so if one goes down or locks you out, then you are still down.

      I find it would be easier to resolve an issue with one company than two

      It is very comforting to be able to call up one provider and say your site is not working, figure it out....instead of them saying it is a host issue and the host saying it is a domain issue.

      Just my opinion but I am sure people had a bad experience with using both at one company.

      Another reason people do this is different IP's or speed issues. I find that Go Daddy's hosting is quite slow compared to others out there.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        I find it would be easier to resolve an issue with one company than two
        And as long as you have no problem...there's no problem. It's a simple thing to keep domains with one registrar and hosting with a different company. It's like fastening your seat belt in the car - chances are you won't need it but it could save you.

        If you don't have hosting, you cant have a site so if one goes down or locks you out, then you are still down.
        If your hosting goes down - you can quickly repoint the DNS of your domain and get your site back up with another host (if you keep a backup of your sites as you should).

        It's not an argument for someone to win - it's good business practice online. One less thing to worry about.
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      • Profile picture of the author AmberJB
        Originally Posted by rjd1265 View Post

        Another reason people do this is different IP's or speed issues. I find that Go Daddy's hosting is quite slow compared to others out there.
        Yes, I agree, and mostly it has been "fast enough" for me. But recently I started a blog that was REALLY slow on GoDaddy's hosting. Probably the theme I was using did a lot of computing on the server, to serve up a page? Maybe, don't know. But I do know I was starting to play solitaire while I waited for the admin edit a post page to show up... Not a pretty thing.

        I moved to a2Hosting, and now the site flies. Whenever will I find time to play solitaire now?

        Plus, the support at a2 has been phenominal.

        Gosh, I sound like a salesman, don't I ? I wonder if I could get to be an a2Hosting affiliate...

        Anyway, THAT is why I have a domain on GoDaddy, and hosting elsewhere. Didn't move the domain, just the hosting.
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        • Profile picture of the author BeautyFanatics
          Originally Posted by AmberJB View Post

          Yes, I agree, and mostly it has been "fast enough" for me. But recently I started a blog that was REALLY slow on GoDaddy's hosting. Probably the theme I was using did a lot of computing on the server, to serve up a page? Maybe, don't know. But I do know I was starting to play solitaire while I waited for the admin edit a post page to show up... Not a pretty thing.

          I moved to a2Hosting, and now the site flies. Whenever will I find time to play solitaire now?

          Plus, the support at a2 has been phenominal.

          Gosh, I sound like a salesman, don't I ? I wonder if I could get to be an a2Hosting affiliate...

          Anyway, THAT is why I have a domain on GoDaddy, and hosting elsewhere. Didn't move the domain, just the hosting.
          Can you use a2Hosting for wordpress? I am interested in starting up in earning an income online and want to get my website started. I have been paying for a domain and hosting with blogger but I am guessing to go places with online marketing and affiliate marketing you need to do your own thing?
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    Agree with Jill and Jack and Kay.

    Another thing I learned when my host went down hard and unexpectedly many years ago: never put your contact email for the host or your domain registrar as an account on your own hosting or domain. For example, yourdomain.com should use another email address for hosting and domain purposes outside yourdomain.com. You can use Yahoo, Outlook, Gmail or whatever you want.

    When my host went down my contact email for my domain was through the hosted domain. I forgot my password and so it took forever a day to get it the DNS changed over to a new host because there was no where for the registrar to send a reset password link nor verification email or anything else.

    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author namehero
    Originally Posted by ED1190 View Post

    This is a question I had been meaning to ask, but never got around to it till now.

    It seems like most people have their domains on sites like GoDaddy or Namecheap, and have their hosting elsewhere like Hostgator, etc.

    Question is, why not have your hosting and domains all in the same place? Is there a particular reason why you should have them located separately?

    Just wondering. Thanks.
    Two main reasons:

    (1) Price - You don't make a bunch of money selling domains. Margins are VERYYY slim so a lot of hosting companies will mark their names up because it's simply not worth their time to offer support when they make make a dollar or two per domain.

    A lot of hosting companies also don't want to go to the trouble to offer Privacy Protection. It's a pain in the butt to setup and manage and doesn't fit in with their business model.

    Because of this, a lot of people will find the cheapest place to register their names and buy hosting elsewhere.

    (2) Paranoia - Some bad apples over the years have made a lot of people paranoid. Horrors stories about ding dongs closing up shop leaving people up in arms about how to access their data/domains lead to overwhelming paranoia about stacking all their eggs in one basket.

    I wanted all my stuff in one platform because I own so many domains / websites - so I built my own platform. Sleep much more sound going that route .
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  • Profile picture of the author Lorens
    Well, I like Godaddy and use it with many .COM, .NET .ORG domains that I have, however for .FR domains I use namecheap because they offer better prices. And of course it is safer not to put all eggs in one basket =)
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  • Profile picture of the author melons
    Definitely price. I pay £17.99 a month for the hosting and domain on one website and it seriously isn't worth it.
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  • Profile picture of the author vic1
    Ed, makes no difference.

    You can have a prob either way so might has well do what ever you prefer, what ever makes it easy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Nikolz
    There are registrars and there are hosters.

    Registrar usually suck in hosting, and hosters usually (almost always) suck in registration.

    Plain and simple.
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    .

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  • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
    Those of you who ARE keeping your domain registration and web hosting separate for reasons other than those indicated by Jill, Jack & Kay - are doing it for the wrong reasons.

    But that's good. At least you ARE keeping them separate.

    However, you should go back and read those reasons again so you don't get caught by the short hairs in the future.

    Those of you who are NOT keeping them separate...
    may just be newbs who took the easy way out, so you should go read the replies by Jill, Jack & Kay again, as well.

    Someone mentioned that they have been managing both registration and hosting from the same source for 8 years without issue. I would begin to worry. You're long overdue.

    Lastly, there are those of you using GoDaddy for hosting. I don't know what to say... A lot of the worst issues have been worked out, but my past experience with them (working on my client's sites) has been horrendous. I use them for domain registration, but they are the ONLY web hosting company that I actively discourage my customers from using.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    I think the main reason is price. Some webhosting companies throw in the domain name for free if you sign up for webhosting for them.

    But some webhosting companies will charge you both for the domain and for the webhosting service. At the end of the day, just make sure it's the exact domain you want, and that the webhosting service is good.
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  • Profile picture of the author TrafficFlow
    I like Godaddy for domains, but not for hosting so that is why I don't use the same provider for both.
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    • Profile picture of the author pawandave
      Banned
      I think two reason

      1>>> Price
      2>>> Security

      and best thing is that both is justified
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  • Profile picture of the author MSutton
    Some hosts will play games with you if cancel your hosting account. Some will outright hold it hostage and require exorbitant fees to get control of it, even though I think this is against ICANN rules. 1&1 comes to mind. Terrible, stay away. I have had problems with Blue host and Host Gator in the past as well.

    If you find an honest host that is ICANN accredited, has reasonable domain prices, and offers a separate domain control panel from the hosting control panel, it might be OK.

    Not all hosts are like this.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialsite
    For me it was easily the price. Sites like hostgator is around $5 or more per month compared to $21 for a whole year at the hosting site I use. The affiliate commission is not as much as hostgator but I am not worried about that. I have had great experience with mine and great customer service.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Archer
    i have lost a website in total because i was a few days late paying the hosting - the host wanted a ridiculous fee to put it back online which I felt was taking advantage of an oversight and way beyond a reasonable fee. It felt like blackmail so i let the site and the domain go. I could have avoided that by keeping the hosting and domain separate.
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