New Trend - Unreasonable Delivery Terms From Info-Products Sellers!

16 replies
I see with big concern that more and more info-product sellers require that we give out personal information such as home address and telephone number to access the products we have paid for, and which is delivered digitally.

I urge everyone to do as I have begun to do, namely to request a refund ASAP with the reasoning that I don't give out such information when it is not needed to deliver the product I purchased.

This kind of protest is the only way we can stop this madness.
#demands #infoproducts #sellers #trend #unreasonable
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    I don't know that it's increasing but wouldn't surprise me. So many "info peddlers" have discovered a new source of income in selling 'leads'.

    I've always asked for a refund if a seller made demands AFTER I paid for a product. Whether it be a forced optin between payment and delivery or requiring my personal info....not gonna happen.

    I have no illusions that I am "stopping the madness" - I'm just not going to participate in it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
      If we become plenty enough, and we all use this as the reason for our refund, we will stop it.

      - Oliver.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Are you talking about asking for such information after your payment has been processed, or as part of the checkout process?

        If it is during the checkout process, it may be a requirement of the vendor's payment processor, especially if they use their own merchant account. It's a fraud prevention thing, making sure the info entered into the shopping cart matches that on record with the credit card issuer.

        If the request comes only after payment goes through, I'm with Kay. I'm seeing more privacy policies, especially ones using the usual "we hate spam" language, with a term buried somewhere about sharing info with selected partners. The "selected partners" are anyone who buys the list.

        (Slightly off topic... I wonder how many of those 'we hate spam' things are incomplete thoughts. 'We hate spam, but we'll do it or enable it if it makes us a buck, suckers.")
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        • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
          I was talking about asking for this information after the purchase was done and as a requirement for them to give me the product I already had paid for. Long form squeeze page with forced fields.

          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          Are you talking about asking for such information after your payment has been processed, or as part of the checkout process?

          If it is during the checkout process, it may be a requirement of the vendor's payment processor, especially if they use their own merchant account. It's a fraud prevention thing, making sure the info entered into the shopping cart matches that on record with the credit card issuer.

          If the request comes only after payment goes through, I'm with Kay. I'm seeing more privacy policies, especially ones using the usual "we hate spam" language, with a term buried somewhere about sharing info with selected partners. The "selected partners" are anyone who buys the list.

          (Slightly off topic... I wonder how many of those 'we hate spam' things are incomplete thoughts. 'We hate spam, but we'll do it or enable it if it makes us a buck, suckers.")
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            You are talking about a "forced opt-in" which many of us object to. It's become more common because sellers are getting by with it - and because there's a market to sell "leads".
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            • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
              Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

              You are talking about a "forced opt-in" which many of us object to. It's become more common because sellers are getting by with it - and because there's a market to sell "leads".
              Yes, a forced opt-in where they asked for the full home address and phone number even the product was delivered by a website.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    It is a common occurrence that people who bond with the person providing the training will generally reveal more and more about themselves as the relationship flourishes.

    Identification for payment processing is one thing.

    Engagement by the people who grow to trust you is another.

    As for list marketing I think the various supermarkets, big retail, Facebook, Google etc all have already got all your data and readily profit from anyone's information.

    Do many people really think that a list of IM buyers is valuable to anyone else other than a group of IM sellers?

    You can just about buy a list of any group of people from the huge number of brokers available.

    Respecting your client's needs and respecting their feelings about sharing their personal information is paramount if you want to survive for the long term.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      Do many people really think that a list of IM buyers is valuable to anyone else other than a group of IM sellers?
      So true. But then - I've always chuckled at the list building on this forum. Many members ONLY build lists through ads here....a rather small pool in my opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
    If I'm buying something, I always have to enter a billing address along with my cc info. I have no problem with that.

    But if they require my address, phone number, etc, I won't make the purchase. I'll give out my name and email address, and that's it. For a digital product there's no need to give a physical address.

    I agree this is a horrible trend. I'd never do it.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Conversely, more and more brick and mortar shops want my email address... Was buying art stuff from a place we've been buying for years has started to ask for out email address... Which I don't want to give. Why can't I just give you money and you give me my brushes anymore? is what I ask... But the cashiers have no clue. They just chuckle and say it's store policy to annoy me.

      I do understand why they do it... But it gets annoying as hell to be asked again and again... And, when everyone's doing it, the lost seconds of me saying No and them saying, You're sure? add up. And, they don't even say what their privacy policy is.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by DABK View Post

        Conversely, more and more brick and mortar shops want my email address... Was buying art stuff from a place we've been buying for years has started to ask for out email address... Which I don't want to give. Why can't I just give you money and you give me my brushes anymore? is what I ask... But the cashiers have no clue. They just chuckle and say it's store policy to annoy me.

        I do understand why they do it... But it gets annoying as hell to be asked again and again... And, when everyone's doing it, the lost seconds of me saying No and them saying, You're sure? add up. And, they don't even say what their privacy policy is.
        Long before Al Gore invented the Internet, I did a stint as an assistant manager at a Radio Shack store. Company policy required asking each customer for their address, no exceptions. Too many tickets without addresses was cause for discipline.

        So we asked. If the customer refused, we didn't make a big thing of it. We just added a tic mark on the ticket and later added "refused" in the address form. Never got in trouble.

        So when they tell you it's store policy, they're probably telling you the truth. Odds are, they're as sick of asking as you are of answering. Cut them some slack and make the transaction as quick and painless as possible for both of you.

        I worked on commission plus overrides, and I'd have much rather seen people writing more tickets instead of filling in addresses, but the decision was made way above my pay grade.
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      • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
        Originally Posted by DABK View Post

        Conversely, more and more brick and mortar shops want my email address... Was buying art stuff from a place we've been buying for years has started to ask for out email address... Which I don't want to give. Why can't I just give you money and you give me my brushes anymore? is what I ask... But the cashiers have no clue. They just chuckle and say it's store policy to annoy me.

        I do understand why they do it... But it gets annoying as hell to be asked again and again... And, when everyone's doing it, the lost seconds of me saying No and them saying, You're sure? add up. And, they don't even say what their privacy policy is.
        I used to work in retail and trust me, we hate having to ask as much as you hate being asked. It sucked. Please don't take it out on the cashiers. They just want to keep their jobs.

        When I worked at a major book store chain, we had to push memberships on customers as they were checking out. Then there'd be various other things we had to ask. During the holidays we'd have a laundry list of questions to ask every single customer. And it was all monitored by store management and corporate. The managers at my store thought it was stupid too, but with corporate watching, they had to keep the pressure on us. Corporate even sent in secret shoppers to see if we were pushing memberships and asking for email addresses.

        If someone was angry with me that I was asking too many questions, I'd politely give them the number to the corporate office and complain to them, because only the higher ups had any power to do anything.


        Sorry for the rambling post. But after working in retail for so long when I was younger I know what it's like to be on the other side of the counter. When asked for your email, a polite "no thanks" and smile is all that's needed.
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        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          I am not taking it out on the cashiers. I'm not taking it out on anyone. I brought it up to add that the same is happening in Offlineland.

          That said, it is annoying and it is doubly annoying when every time I buy something, they ask for my email address (even though they have it) yet, months later, they have yet to send me the first offer or letter or quote of the day.

          And, it can be done better... If you give us your email address, we'll email you offers on similar product is better than What's your email address?



          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          Long before Al Gore invented the Internet, I did a stint as an assistant manager at a Radio Shack store. Company policy required asking each customer for their address, no exceptions. Too many tickets without addresses was cause for discipline.

          So we asked. If the customer refused, we didn't make a big thing of it. We just added a tic mark on the ticket and later added "refused" in the address form. Never got in trouble.

          So when they tell you it's store policy, they're probably telling you the truth. Odds are, they're as sick of asking as you are of answering. Cut them some slack and make the transaction as quick and painless as possible for both of you.

          I worked on commission plus overrides, and I'd have much rather seen people writing more tickets instead of filling in addresses, but the decision was made way above my pay grade.
          Originally Posted by BradVert2013 View Post

          I used to work in retail and trust me, we hate having to ask as much as you hate being asked. It sucked. Please don't take it out on the cashiers. They just want to keep their jobs.

          When I worked at a major book store chain, we had to push memberships on customers as they were checking out. Then there'd be various other things we had to ask. During the holidays we'd have a laundry list of questions to ask every single customer. And it was all monitored by store management and corporate. The managers at my store thought it was stupid too, but with corporate watching, they had to keep the pressure on us. Corporate even sent in secret shoppers to see if we were pushing memberships and asking for email addresses.

          If someone was angry with me that I was asking too many questions, I'd politely give them the number to the corporate office and complain to them, because only the higher ups had any power to do anything.


          Sorry for the rambling post. But after working in retail for so long when I was younger I know what it's like to be on the other side of the counter. When asked for your email, a polite "no thanks" and smile is all that's needed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Originally Posted by Oliver Hart View Post

    ... namely to request a refund ASAP with the reasoning that I don't give out such information when it is not needed to deliver the product I purchased.
    Alot of sellers do this to increase their backend sales. Doing offline direct mail in combination of email marketing will boost your backend sales. That's why most people request for your full address information. The phone number aspect.... i dont know. I would never call you to sell you over the phone for my $27 product. That's trivial.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
    I'm not sure why so many on this forum get down on people in the "IM" niche. It's a hugely profitable niche that I have made a killing in. Besides that, I love it. I'd never switch to any other niche. IM is the real deal, at least for me.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
      Originally Posted by nicheblogger75 View Post

      I'm not sure why so many on this forum get down on people in the "IM" niche. It's a hugely profitable niche that I have made a killing in. Besides that, I love it. I'd never switch to any other niche. IM is the real deal, at least for me.
      Who is getting down toward people in the IM niche in this thread?

      Sometimes some people in the IM niche is getting too creative in their eager to build a buyers list, and many people are also selling those e-mail lists to people who is willing to buy such a list.

      I assume in this case the seller had an idea that if he promotes stuff with email, there would be plenty of unopen emails, but if they promote by text message or by mobile marketing, it is harder to reject that promotional message.

      However, when I asked for a full refund because I could not access the product I just purchased, they were very quick to give me an access link without providing them with further information.

      Sometimes it helps to be resistant.
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