Amazon product review

24 replies
Hi again
I need to know how I write good amazon product review without buying product,anyone do this for affiliate website
#amazon #product #review
  • Profile picture of the author Garryr
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  • Profile picture of the author xnice
    You just base on product description and find pros and cons from customer reviews. Summary it with your view.
    You can hire some people from Upwork or Fiverr ( native writers) do it. Make sure they follow your above instruction.
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeRand
      Originally Posted by xnice View Post

      You just base on product description and find pros and cons from customer reviews. Summary it with your view.
      You can hire some people from Upwork or Fiverr ( native writers) do it. Make sure they follow your above instruction.
      Thanks for the comment
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeRand
    anyone.............
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    • Profile picture of the author agmccall
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      • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
        Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

        I second this 100%. Erica (Sojourn) REALLY knows her stuff when it comes to Amazon. Her courses (she has a few others besides this one), cover everything you will ever need to know about promoting products as an Amazon affiliate.

        I also follow Jan Roos and one or two others who post to the WF.

        But I emphasize, follow Erica Stone and you will be onto a winner
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          I don't do "product reviews" per se. Instead, I would strongly recommend a line of expendable equipment supplies to owners of relevant products.

          For example, initially provide application specs for replacement parts, maintenance tools, repair kits, routine expendables, etc.

          When your customers are ready for capital investment in new equipment or upgrades, you are then in the most enviable position of being considered as the "expert" for product recommendsations.
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      • Profile picture of the author wayneh
        Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

        I agree with agmccall that is one of the bst courses available and I have been able to earn commissions using it.
        Sojourn's (the creator of the product) post later gives you what you need to know to write the best reviews you can.
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        CLICK HERE for techniques and reviews of affiliate marketing training
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  • Profile picture of the author publicworks
    Originally Posted by MikeRand View Post

    Hi again
    I need to know how I write good amazon product review without buying product,anyone do this for affiliate website
    As far as I know there are many freelancer do this kind of work in various freelancing market place. You can take a glance on the Upwork, Fiverr or, other site. I am sure you will get expert writer. Thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author agmccall
      Originally Posted by publicworks View Post

      As far as I know there are many freelancer do this kind of work in various freelancing market place. You can take a glance on the Upwork, Fiverr or, other site. I am sure you will get expert writer. Thanks
      But you probably will not get a quality, profitable review.

      al
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  • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
    Mike - I've been doing this for years and it's one of my favorite Amazon affiliate marketing methods.

    There are multiple approaches. Some people write short reviews that are rehashed information from Amazon. I take a much more detailed approach. For me, this method results in high-ranking reviews that can rank well for years without building backlinks or doing anything more than building a solid resource for consumers.

    Here's my process in a nutshell (well, more than a nutshell, as it turned out):
    1. Read the product description on Amazon and make a note of all important features, accessories, and even what else people buy when they buy that product.
    2. Read as many of the Amazon reviews as needed to get a feel for the pros, cons, most important features, challenges. Some products have a thousand or more reviews and if I think it's necessary to read them all, I will. Make notes about your findings. This is one of the hardest parts because you'll find conflicting information. Make it your job to figure out which side of the story you believe to be true (ex: is the handle really as flimsy as some people have said or do you think people making this claim just aren't using it properly?). Form your own opinion on each pro and con. Also, keep an eye out for products that have taken unnatural steps to force higher ratings than the product might deserve. Amazon is still filled with lots of fake reviews, in my opinion, and there are lots of sellers who are offering discounts in exchange for reviews. Some basic math can help you calculate what the rating is or people who don't mention they got a discount vs those who did and sometimes you'll spot a very large discrepancy in those ratings. That's good information that could clue you into a product that isn't really as good as it might appear if you relied on just the star rating.
    3. Go through the Amazon Q&A for that product. Make notes about important questions that are asked and either not answered or where the answer provides information most consumers would want to know before they buy.
    4. Read the product description on the manufacturer's site. Make note of any features you hadn't already found on Amazon. Take note of any compatible accessories the manufacturer recommends.
    5. Go through the product's online manual, if you can find it. Make note of all features, how they're used, what they can do, what they can't do, how easy they appear to be to use, and any limitation on use that you think consumers should know before they buy.
    6. Find a video of the product being used, if you can. Make notes about what seems to work well, how loud the product might be, how well it works, and anything you see as a potential negative of the product based on what the demonstrator had to do to use the product.
    7. Ground yourself in what consumers will want to do with such a product. You must put yourself in the head of the end consumer and help them understand what they will and won't get if they buy this product. Using examples in your review of when the product is the ideal choice and when it isn't helps add relevant information to your review, add more long-tail search phrases for the product naturally (without having to even think about them or do any research) and helps the consumer make a better decision.
    8. Optional extra step - go see the product in a store. Take pics, try it out (if you can), talk to a salesperson and get more info.
    9. Optional extra step - contact the manufacturer to get answers to any outstanding questions about the product.
    10. Come up with the outline for your review and use your notes to write your full review.
    I know - yuck, lots of work! However, that work can pay off for years. Most affiliates won't go to that level of detail. If you do, though, you can rank better, rank for more phrases, get more traffic, and have a review that will hold up in Google for years to come.
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    • Profile picture of the author interwebbuzz
      Well I am going to quote this just in case the author edits it! I will refer back to this later. Thanks.

      Originally Posted by Sojourn View Post

      Mike - I've been doing this for years and it's one of my favorite Amazon affiliate marketing methods.

      There are multiple approaches. Some people write short reviews that are rehashed information from Amazon. I take a much more detailed approach. For me, this method results in high-ranking reviews that can rank well for years without building backlinks or doing anything more than building a solid resource for consumers.

      Here's my process in a nutshell (well, more than a nutshell, as it turned out):
      1. Read the product description on Amazon and make a note of all important features, accessories, and even what else people buy when they buy that product.
      2. Read as many of the Amazon reviews as needed to get a feel for the pros, cons, most important features, challenges. Some products have a thousand or more reviews and if I think it's necessary to read them all, I will. Make notes about your findings. This is one of the hardest parts because you'll find conflicting information. Make it your job to figure out which side of the story you believe to be true (ex: is the handle really as flimsy as some people have said or do you think people making this claim just aren't using it properly?). Form your own opinion on each pro and con. Also, keep an eye out for products that have taken unnatural steps to force higher ratings than the product might deserve. Amazon is still filled with lots of fake reviews, in my opinion, and there are lots of sellers who are offering discounts in exchange for reviews. Some basic math can help you calculate what the rating is or people who don't mention they got a discount vs those who did and sometimes you'll spot a very large discrepancy in those ratings. That's good information that could clue you into a product that isn't really as good as it might appear if you relied on just the star rating.
      3. Go through the Amazon Q&A for that product. Make notes about important questions that are asked and either not answered or where the answer provides information most consumers would want to know before they buy.
      4. Read the product description on the manufacturer's site. Make note of any features you hadn't already found on Amazon. Take note of any compatible accessories the manufacturer recommends.
      5. Go through the product's online manual, if you can find it. Make note of all features, how they're used, what they can do, what they can't do, how easy they appear to be to use, and any limitation on use that you think consumers should know before they buy.
      6. Find a video of the product being used, if you can. Make notes about what seems to work well, how loud the product might be, how well it works, and anything you see as a potential negative of the product based on what the demonstrator had to do to use the product.
      7. Ground yourself in what consumers will want to do with such a product. You must put yourself in the head of the end consumer and help them understand what they will and won't get if they buy this product. Using examples in your review of when the product is the ideal choice and when it isn't helps add relevant information to your review, add more long-tail search phrases for the product naturally (without having to even think about them or do any research) and helps the consumer make a better decision.
      8. Optional extra step - go see the product in a store. Take pics, try it out (if you can), talk to a salesperson and get more info.
      9. Optional extra step - contact the manufacturer to get answers to any outstanding questions about the product.
      10. Come up with the outline for your review and use your notes to write your full review.
      I know - yuck, lots of work! However, that work can pay off for years. Most affiliates won't go to that level of detail. If you do, though, you can rank better, rank for more phrases, get more traffic, and have a review that will hold up in Google for years to come.
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      • Profile picture of the author interwebbuzz
        One question I have is Sojourn says is that a great review will result in Google giving you traffic fir years and years. But I'd like to know how realistic is that? Sure some properties may last for years but will the majority do so? Even if it is the dog's bo******. I had one web property that lasted 6 years and was still going strong. It was a blogspot blog. A property belonging to Google!
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        • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
          Originally Posted by interwebbuzz View Post

          One question I have is Sojourn says is that a great review will result in Google giving you traffic fir years and years. But I'd like to know how realistic is that? Sure some properties may last for years but will the majority do so? Even if it is the dog's bo******. I had one web property that lasted 6 years and was still going strong. It was a blogspot blog. A property belonging to Google!
          I'm 6 years and counting on my oldest review site on my own domain which really puts a frame around my "years and years" comment.

          One thing to add, though, is that the niche can play a big role in how long a review can continue to earn commissions. Some niches have products that get replaced or discontinued on a very rapid basis.

          If you write a really strong review on a product that gets discontinued a year later, the earning power of that review is going to decrease heavily in a relatively short period of time. You can still use that post to point to a replacement product but the number of people searching for reviews of that product will decline.

          Other niches have products that stay on the market for years. Rank well for reviews of those kinds of products and you can do the work once but have that review consistently earn traffic and commissions for a much longer period of time.
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Optional extra step - contact the manufacturer to get answers to any outstanding questions about the product.
            This one may be optional, but I've found that getting something extra, straight from an official source, can give a big boost in perceived authority. You're not just a reviewer scraping comments that anyone can read, you have "inside information."

            This doesn't just apply to Amazon products, either.
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            • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
              Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

              This one may be optional, but I've found that getting something extra, straight from an official source, can give a big boost in perceived authority. You're not just a reviewer scraping comments that anyone can read, you have "inside information."

              This doesn't just apply to Amazon products, either.
              I agree, John. It goes a long way with your reader when you can say something like "I checked with the manufacturer and this product will not do A, B, C" or "I contacted the manufacturer to confirm the dimensions because I found they're incorrect on several websites" or "the manufacturer gave me the product number for replacement part X which wasn't immediately clear in their manual or on their site".

              My dad is THE toughest comparison shopper I know. He's an accountant/engineer. He's ruthless in researching a product before he buys. He'd contact a manufacturer before buying, if he had a question.

              By thinking about what questions could come up and addressing those questions in the review we're doing work that will save buyers time and that's one of the values we add to the process.

              Another value we add is to dig deep enough to know when to say "don't buy this one" or "don't buy this one but, instead, buy this other one and here's why". Too many sites just rehash Amazon and make every product look good whether it is or not.
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              • Profile picture of the author myob
                Ideally, position yourself (ie through education, experience, etc) in the niche to limit propects' choice to only one product or brand name recommendation. This technique will cause conversions to soar, and the chances for add-ons to the order will usually dramatically increase as well.

                For example, in the automotive repair niche, I will initially always recommend one particular brand of air hose and air tool, which are generally already popular within the industry. When the time comes for a capital investment such as an air compressor or large equipment, my recommendation is often given considerable weight among much of the competition.
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                • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
                  Originally Posted by myob View Post

                  Ideally, position yourself (ie through education, experience, etc) in the niche to limit propects' choice to only one product or brand name recommendation. This technique will cause conversions to soar, and the chances for add-ons to the order will usually dramatically increase as well.

                  For example, in the automotive repair niche, I will initially always recommend one particular brand of air hose and air tool, which are generally already popular within the industry. When the time comes for a capital investment such as an air compressor or large equipment, my recommendation is often given considerable weight among much of the competition.
                  myob - This is intriguing (as in I read it yesterday and then spent the night pondering the idea - I'm a "thinker"). It's not a technique I've used before but I can see how it makes perfect sense in your example.

                  I know that our business models are very different. In my review sites, there usually isn't a one-size-fits-all model. If I were reviewing microwaves, for example, the student looking to buy one for his small dorm or flat would probably do just fine with a small, cheap option whereas a mother of four who does all the cooking at home and wants a large, convection microwave isn't going to be satisfied with the small, cheap option.

                  However, the application of the technique in a review site could be situation based. Any student looking for a dorm microwave should look at model X, for example and here's why...etc, etc, etc. Which leads to what I call "informational" posts (vs "review" posts) like "Best Microwave for Any Dorm Room" or "Best Microwave for a Small Apartment Kitchen" - great topics to add to any review site.
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                  • Profile picture of the author interwebbuzz
                    Originally Posted by Sojourn View Post

                    However, the application of the technique in a review site could be situation based. Any student looking for a dorm microwave should look at model X, for example and here's why...etc, etc, etc. Which leads to what I call "informational" posts (vs "review" posts) like "Best Microwave for Any Dorm Room" or "Best Microwave for a Small Apartment Kitchen" - great topics to add to any review site.
                    A bit like some of the adsense sites that used to clutter Google. I am sure some of them provided useful information even if it was a 1 page wordpress site.
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                  • Profile picture of the author myob
                    Originally Posted by Sojourn View Post

                    I know that our business models are very different. In my review sites, there usually isn't a one-size-fits-all model. If I were reviewing microwaves, for example, the student looking to buy one for his small dorm or flat would probably do just fine with a small, cheap option whereas a mother of four who does all the cooking at home and wants a large, convection microwave isn't going to be satisfied with the small, cheap option.
                    Indeed, it is extremely difficult IMO (in some of the most lucrative niches it's impossible) to use the search engines for driving the targeted traffic required for this model to work.

                    My traffic is directed to fairly narrow demographics, so I can focus on "one size fits all (or most)".

                    In addition, my marketing method encourages two-way dialogue, so if a customer has specific needs it can be addressed with other options or recommendations.
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                    • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
                      Originally Posted by myob View Post

                      Indeed, it is extremely difficult IMO (in some of the most lucrative niches it's impossible) to use the search engines for driving the targeted traffic required for this model to work.
                      Fortunately, that hasn't been an issue for me but, as I recall from past threads, the income generated from your business model compared to mine can be much higher.

                      While I might get a niche review site to a decent four figures - a low five figures in some niches - your model can generate a very attractive five figures/month.

                      You're also not relying on SEO traffic exclusively which could allow you to see a net return more quickly and scale up more quickly but requires ad spend and, I'm sure, a great deal of analytical analysis to get the right advertising in place.

                      There are probably different level of passive income in the two models, too, but I'm guessing here. I can write the content and let it do its thing, ignore a site for quite some time and still see sales while I work on something else. I don't want one-on-one customer contact other than through post comments which can help me provide an answer to a question other consumers might also have.

                      The two models require different kinds of work, I suspect, and I'm much better suited to mine than I would be to yours. But...I've always been intrigued by your posts and would love to compare notes at some point. ; )
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                      • Profile picture of the author myob
                        Originally Posted by Sojourn View Post

                        The two models require different kinds of work, I suspect, and I'm much better suited to mine than I would be to yours.
                        Perhaps these two models really aren't so much different as you think. Both require producing quality content. The only major differences I see are the purposing and focus of this content.

                        My marketing method predates the "product review" model (and even Google itself), which often provides a huge competive advantage over such monolithic marketing concepts.

                        Writing content for real live eyeballs, which is published in real publications that captivate targeted audiences is still a faster, better, and cheaper method for driving massivive quantities of highly convertible traffic than any concept I've ever seen.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Gates
    Banned
    Don't waste your time on writing reviews let the pros do it for you! We use these guys they are the best when it comes to Aamazon/Products Reviews https://bluepenarticles.com

    Have fun!
    Michael
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  • Profile picture of the author dale2811
    You could also search in the Warriors for Hire for Review Writers...
    There are some very talented people in there once you filter through them.
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