Affiliates asking for a review copy - any red flags?

11 replies
Hey guys,


What to do when you receive an email from a generic email address (e.g. john.johnson@gmail.com) asking you for a review copy? You do some research and that email may or may not have a history etc (might as well be created for that purpose alone, getting free review copies). So that person may be really an affiliate regardless of the name on the email sender ..or not.

Yes, I know vendors don't require NDAs to be signed when an affiliate is asking for a review copy. I also know it's just futile to ask for a copy you don t intend to promote ( but maybe get info on products in that niche ), when one can just buy the product and ask for a refund one day later.

Any due-diligence one can do on this matter?

Thank you, Warriors!
#affiliates #copy #flags #red #review
  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    My advice: do less running around and let the affiliate do it for you. What I mean to say is, let he or she know that, sure, you have no problem handing out a review copy, but - come on - let's get professional here: tell me about yourself, about your websites, about traffic volumes, about how you intend to promote, projected unique referral levels. Then all you do is save the email and hurl it at the next review-seeker. Most of them will be cretins, out to pull a fast one. Handful, worthwhile folks with traffic; although, should be noted, these folks tend to know enough to do the above. Hope some of that helps - typing one handed here, late lunch.

    - Tom
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    • Profile picture of the author IonutMunteanu
      Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

      My advice: do less running around and let the affiliate do it for you. What I mean to say is, let he or she know that, sure, you have no problem handing out a review copy, but - come on - let's get professional here: tell me about yourself, about your websites, about traffic volumes, about how you intend to promote, projected unique referral levels. Then all you do is save the email and hurl it at the next review-seeker. Most of them will be cretins, out to pull a fast one. Handful, worthwhile folks with traffic; although, should be noted, these folks tend to know enough to do the above. Hope some of that helps - typing one handed here, late lunch.

      - Tom


      Sure does, Tom. I asked all that and he mentioned in detail how he intends to promote, but not his history and stuff.

      I sent him the copy, thinking that if he really wanted to swipe my product, he could have just bought/refunded it. less work than exchanging a few email with me.

      Thank you!
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      • Profile picture of the author irawr
        Banned
        Originally Posted by IonutMunteanu View Post

        Sure does, Tom. I asked all that and he mentioned in detail how he intends to promote, but not his history and stuff.

        I sent him the copy, thinking that if he really wanted to swipe my product, he could have just bought/refunded it. less work than exchanging a few email with me.

        Thank you!
        I think Tom nailed it. As far as less work goes: I mean one technique is basically "It never hurts to ask" and the other is theft and borderline credit card fraud. Don't assume it's effort, it might be ethics.

        Also, my personal review copies for a book only had the first few chapters in full, then the next few only had a few pages, then half the book was blank, excluding the chapters and the first paragraph of each chapter and some images. Lots of text like "This is a review copy, this text was removed from the review copy but is visible in the real product." I feel that technique solves the review-copy theft problem. The reviewer should still be able to do a review and they get the general idea what's in the book without getting all the details.

        So if there was a Chapter named "8. The Most Effective Facebook Strategy: Drive Massive Traffic" they read the intro paragraph and see a few pictures, they should know what's going on but no tricks are not actually revealed. This could end up actually driving you some sales so you might as well just hand out this type of review copy freely to anyone that asks.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamescanz
    If I don't know or at least know of them...

    Then they probably aren't getting one.
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  • Profile picture of the author peterbuck
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author doublespaces
      If someone really wants to review your product/service so badly, they won't mind answering a few questions. Getting a 'Review copy' is a poor man's slimey way of getting the goods for free. Don't fall for Prince Abibu's bank wire tricks.

      I am a buyer of countless plugins, addons, freelance work, etc. I've spent tens of thousands develping CRMs, custom financial websites and many other things and I've never been so bold to ask someone for a review copy of even the simplest software(I have a blog/forum and still, no). Even though half my purchases are educational, I still am your target market. If you want a reviewer, find your own.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
    Probably also depends on the price of your product, I see people asking for review copies for products under $5 and even in some cases $1 WSO, that would be a red flag to be me for obvious reasons.

    You will get people happy just to review products and post a review online so nothing wrong with that really but in my honest opinion I take no notice of any reviews , if someone hasnt paid for a product and reviews it how many bad reviews do you ever read ? Not many.

    Same even applies for the big IM launches, I skip the reviews as I know it's likely they are JV partners. Indeed in some cases if I read a review from certain people I know it's likely to be BS.

    To get your product out there reviews can still help no doubt.
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Every now and then I will ask for a Review Copy to see if it is something that meets my specific criteria for promotion.

      But sometimes I will just go ahead and Buy it.
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    Sometimes, the person who you don't know and wants a free copy to review your product can be your most successful affiliate.
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    • Profile picture of the author rjd1265
      I do not give out review copies. They need to buy it if they want to promote it....just like I had to do with every product I promoted.

      If they are too cheap to pay $37 for the product, then I dont want them as an affiliate.

      I found that my review copies (when I did hand them out) were be given away as free guides to get emails and were directed to another affiliate offer.....or handed out as free bonuses.
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  • Profile picture of the author ydsimple
    A day ago one affiliate asked for review copy and said that he have a list of 5,300 subscribers. I asked him to send me screenshot of his list, still no response from him. Yes as being said, if there is 100% money back why wont just get the product review it and ask for money back, explaining the situation.
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