WAIT! click ok to leave or cancel to remain on the page!

78 replies
I was just curious, hoping maybe some fellow warriors could shed some light on this subject.

There seems to be an abundance of landing pages that have the script where when the button is clicked to leave a website, a message pops up with the "WAIT!! I have something to offer you! etc etc, click ok to continue or cancel to stay on the same page"

I honestly despise these pages and I was wondering if anyone can speak from personal experience if they DO in fact increase conversions?

It seems everyone I speak to absolutely hates them and immediately leaves after the message pops up. But there HAS to be a method to the madness, so I figure SOMEONE has to have seen increased conversions?
#cancel #click #leave #page #remain #wait
  • Profile picture of the author ADAMw3
    Of course they do.

    It's lost traffic anyways if people are click out of your site. Think about it... If you get a single additional sale from using this, it was worth it. I find the best offers are opt in pages or downsells.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
    I find the practice personally intrusive and offensive, and I won't buy from a site that uses it and I will absolutely NOT use it on any of my sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author artsub
    It could also be said that most people that go to your sales page leave without buying... like anything, it's a numbers game. Of course not everyone is going to stay, but you are not aiming for everyone. At the end of the day they are leaving anyway, you may as well have a shot at them. Even if you get an extra 5% to opt-in or 0.5% to buy (just 1 in 200) then surely that makes it worth while (yes, I have seen increased conversions).

    I think the key is to offer something a bit different before they go. Yes it's just annoying if you get a "please don't go"... if I didn't want to go, I wouldn't have clicked it in the first place... but if you get a discount, or an extra bonus, or something that wasn't offered in the first place, that works better.

    Intellichat use this same concept, and although I haven't used them, I know people that have reported amazing results from this. This is basically where as they are going to go, a chat window pops up so they can chat. It doesn't need to be manned, because it uses artificial intelligence. It's actually way better than you might think... I tried to trick one knowing it was a robot one time, and struggled.

    When I couldn't trick it at first, I asked it to sleep with me, and it said I was being rude and it was going to end the conversation... I almost started thinking it was real and started feeling bad! I did get it in the end, but I was very impressed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zach Booker
    Yes it does. Depending on how it's used.

    For instance, say on my personal blog I used that script so every visitor that left saw that messgae. It'd probably just piss off everyone; they've viewed the blog liked it or not and have decided to leave. Maybe they'll come back maybe they won't.

    But let's say you're using this script on a niche site that is there purely to get sales. If someone tries to leave than yes you need to try and make them reconsider. Because no matter what they most likely won't come back.

    The difference is on certain sites your aim is to get them to come back, like your personal blog would be, and certain sites are there strictly to make sales.

    Now it depends on how these pop ups are used, too.

    One's the say "wait, are you sure you want to leave?" aren't going to work, at all.

    Often on certain niche sites you'll do well if you say "Wait, before you leave I want to give you some free stuff on dog training."

    And than if they say ok you'll send them to a page of your site with an opt-in box on it where you'll tell them the benfits of joining your list.

    This works very well.

    So in conclusion; yes they can sometimes be annoying but they can also help the reader and give them a great free gift. (Always make your opt-in presents of value, it's like a virtual first impression.)

    Zach
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  • Profile picture of the author artsub
    Steven,

    Here is the thing with your logic... you jump on a site, decide to buy the product... you will never see the exit pop, and won't even know it's there. You will only see it if you were going to leave without buying anyway, so using you as an example, even though you would never buy from a site that uses this, the vendor has not cost themselves a sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
      Originally Posted by artsub View Post

      Steven,

      Here is the thing with your logic... you jump on a site, decide to buy the product... you will never see the exit pop, and won't even know it's there. You will only see it if you were going to leave without buying anyway, so using you as an example, even though you would never buy from a site that uses this, the vendor has not cost themselves a sale.
      Actually, they have. I rarely buy on my first visit to a site. I usually check it out, then do some research to see if others have any feedback on the product in question, and I'll even ask some of my clients or students about certain products.

      Just the other day I was on a site and found it fairly compelling. I bookmarked the site so I could return to it later to examine it more carefully, and when I navigated away from the page I got the "Wait don't go yet!" pop-up.

      Not only did it cost the product publisher a sale, but it cost the affiliate a commission since I had purposely gone to the site by request of someone on one of my list and used their affiliate link in case I decided to buy.

      Now don't get me wrong, I won't begrudge any IM'er who wants to use whatever reasonable tactic they wish to try an improve their sales. However, as a buyer I have my own right to decide what I like and dislike about a seller, and whether or not the things I dislike about them is sufficient to cost them the sale.

      It is the marketer's choice to choose their weapon, and it is my choice to decide whether or not they deserve my money.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
        Originally Posted by Steven Carl Kelly View Post

        Actually, they have. I rarely buy on my first visit to a site. I usually check it out, then do some research to see if others have any feedback on the product in question...
        Ditto. Also, sometimes I'll come across something that sounds interesting, but I don't have time to read through the sales letter, so I'll save the URL and check it out later. But, if they make it difficult for me to do that, I probably won't be coming back.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
          Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

          Ditto. Also, sometimes I'll come across something that sounds interesting, but I don't have time to read through the sales letter, so I'll save the URL and check it out later. But, if they make it difficult for me to do that, I probably won't be coming back.
          I think in some cases adding these exit pop-ups are simply a lazy way to increase conversion rates. If I wanted to increase conversion by half a percent, I'd first concentrate on the copy and the sales page itself before I threw an exit pop-up on the site.

          But to each his own. Personally, I'm extremely turned off by them and therefore I'm currently not interested in using them. Could they make me a little bit more money? Maybe. But I'd rather feel good about my marketing efforts.
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          • Profile picture of the author theimdude
            Originally Posted by Steven Carl Kelly View Post

            I think in some cases adding these exit pop-ups are simply a lazy way to increase conversion rates. If I wanted to increase conversion by half a percent, I'd first concentrate on the copy and the sales page itself before I threw an exit pop-up on the site.

            But to each his own. Personally, I'm extremely turned off by them and therefore I'm currently not interested in using them. Could they make me a little bit more money? Maybe. But I'd rather feel good about my marketing efforts.
            Steven you a bit narrow minded here as this is part of marketing. The only reason you know about these tactics is because you into IM.

            So do you also disagree with walking into a shop and as you walk out the owner runs to you outside the shop and offer you a free product. Would you also pull up your nose and walk away and never go back to the shop?

            My take on this.

            As I do IM and know how this work if I want something I will load the page first and then backtrack to look what discount I can get.

            But what makes me mad is if the opening price is $47 and the discount is $25 and even madder when I leave the discount offer is another discount which make the product now like $7 as that proves the vendor is offering something of no value

            I get cheesed of with vendors doing pop ups when I enter a page. Let me read first and then decide.
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            • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
              Originally Posted by theimdude View Post

              Steven you a bit narrow minded here as this is part of marketing.
              These devices are a part of marketing, and a part I choose not to use on my sites. Others may use them as much as they like, that is completely their own choice.
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              • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
                Instead of a new thread on this topic, I found this quasi-old thread on this issue. (I know - shock - someone searched the forum.)

                The 1st few times I got hit with the click ok to leave it was interesting. After a thousand times of my browser being highjacked and not leaving a page when I ask it to, it's beyond irritating.

                A decade ago browser hijacking aka mousetrapping or having endless pop-ups was popular for awhile. Then there was a groundswell of irritated consumers.

                My law office even had some cases on the issue - and the courts were not too pleased with the webmasters! Injunction orders were issued.

                So I'm just saying ... if you're preventing someone from leaving your web page the ice is getting thin. If you don't think laws can applied for interfering with a person's computer and web browsing software, you aren't thinking.
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                • Profile picture of the author krcorser
                  While these annoyed me at first, now I just know to click twice to exit a lot of IM sites. On the plus side, I'm glad I saved some money on IM products.
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      • Profile picture of the author MSGeek
        Originally Posted by Steven Carl Kelly View Post

        Just the other day I was on a site and found it fairly compelling. I bookmarked the site so I could return to it later to examine it more carefully, and when I navigated away from the page I got the "Wait don't go yet!" pop-up.
        The question is are you a typical case or minority? In the end that's a numbers game. If 1% or 99% leaving the page gets pissed off and don't buy, which they would only do with 10% probability because they may forget the address, other priorities took over or they just ask a wrong person for an opinion (which does not mean the product is bad, but the person who was asked may had an indigestion that day), well, you lost ~0.1% sales.

        If exit popup brought 10% to your opt-in list and you've got 10% sales on the list due to multiple exposure, you've earned ~1% sales back.

        I hate those pop-ups too, but I think the key issue is that most of the time its implemented disrespectfully to the visitor. BTW, I hate those AI chats with pretty girls too. Anyway, I am personally experiemnting with exit-popups on sales letters and opt-in pages, but only there.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
          Originally Posted by MSGeek View Post

          The question is are you a typical case or minority? In the end that's a numbers game. If 1% or 99% leaving the page gets pissed off and don't buy, which they would only do with 10% probability because they may forget the address, other priorities took over or they just ask a wrong person for an opinion (which does not mean the product is bad, but the person who was asked may had an indigestion that day), well, you lost ~0.1% sales.

          If exit popup brought 10% to your opt-in list and you've got 10% sales on the list due to multiple exposure, you've earned ~1% sales back.

          I hate those pop-ups too, but I think the key issue is that most of the time its implemented disrespectfully to the visitor. BTW, I hate those AI chats with pretty girls too. Anyway, I am personally experiemnting with exit-popups on sales letters and opt-in pages, but only there.
          I'm more interested in building long-term relationships. I don't want an extra 1% in sales enough to implement an exit pop-up. Instead, if I want an extra 1% in sales, I'll either drive more traffic or improve my copy/offer enough to convert 1% more.
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          • Profile picture of the author Martin Percival
            I have to agree with the comments about checking the price "just to see if I can get it even lower".

            Now what does that say about my original view of the value of the product, that I was prepared to walk away at the higher price? I guess it shows that I have already got a built-in Pavlovian reaction after seeing so many of these pop-ups.....and that's after only being in this game for around 2 months!

            What worries me more is that the seller devalues the stuff (in my eyes) that I might have bought for a much higher price. Is that telling me that it was really a pile of crap in the first place? :-)

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            • Profile picture of the author jasonl70
              Originally Posted by Steven Carl Kelly View Post

              Not only did it cost the product publisher a sale, but it cost the affiliate a commission since I had purposely gone to the site by request of someone on one of my list and used their affiliate link in case I decided to buy.
              to each his or her own, I guess. I personaly would not change my mind about buying a product for what I feel is an illogical reason. The product hasn't changed any, and now I know I'll get a discount.

              Originally Posted by silverbax View Post

              Those pop-ups cost vendors thousands of dollars in affiliate sales because you can't direct link to those types of pages, so guys like me don't even bother to test.
              How many affiliates still direct link though? google only let's one do it, so I was under the impression it was a dieing method anyways.

              Originally Posted by silverbax View Post

              And I've run tests where it usually costs way more sales than it keeps because people think either

              a. the site is "one of THOSE" scam sites
              b. putting a virus on their machine.

              So arguments that you are grabbing an extra sale here and there completely ignore the fact that it may have cost them 50 sales to get that one. My sites are trying to build lifetime value out of a customer, and if I hit them with a pop up, I probably drive them away forever.

              It basically boils down to whether you are trying to grab every dollar TODAY with no plan for tomorrow or whether you are trying to build a sustainable, long term business with repeat customers, growth, etc.

              I'm sure it works for some people, but it always costs me way more in long term customers. They won't come back when you hit them with the pop up.
              I just don't think the vast majority of people who are actually interested in the product take such a draconian view of this.

              Originally Posted by silverbax View Post

              My take is like this: you walk into an electronics to buy an MP3 player. But none of the MP3 players look good, or they are overpriced. There is nothing in the store you want to buy. You start to walk out of the door, but a salesman blocks the door, grabs you buy the arm to hold you, pulls your wallet out and tosses it away and maybe even locks the door closed and screams, "Wait! What if I gave you $10 off?" Now, true, some people might buy. But most people are going to pick up their wallet, leave and never EVER come back. And as silly as that might sound, that's exactly what vendors are doing to their customers online. When they see those garish pop ups, most users think 'Oh crap! a virus', or they think they can't get out of the site and/or they envision having to pay someone to fix their computer.
              I think it's more like the store clerk stopping me for a second and handing me a 30% off coupon as I left the store. If I wasn't interested, I'd find him annoying. If I was interested, I would be "cool - I just saved some money".

              I WILL test an exit pop on the next site I build for a product.. it won't be for a discount on the exact same product though, but more likely a stripped down 'lite' version of it. Or maybe a cheaper and different product altogether. One of the case studies for launch tree convinced me that this approach is very much worth looking into, as they had MORE sales of the product pitched in the exit pop (a totaly different product) then they did from their main product/sales page!
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Crofford
      Originally Posted by artsub View Post

      Steven,

      Here is the thing with your logic... you jump on a site, decide to buy the product... you will never see the exit pop, and won't even know it's there. You will only see it if you were going to leave without buying anyway, so using you as an example, even though you would never buy from a site that uses this, the vendor has not cost themselves a sale.
      I agree with Steven on this. With me they will lose a sale as I rarely/never buy the first time I visit a site and will never buy from a site that uses this popup.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Mcalorum
    I s'pose yes, if a bonus is offered that does change the game a little bit, and may persuade me otherwise. But there are many sites that just seem to say they want to offer a bonus and then never actually deliver said bonus, or the bonus wasn't worth the time of day.

    But yes, I guess if you are purely interested in sales and you offer a dandy bonus than it is worth upsetting some people for that extra sale. Thanks for the input everyone.

    ~Grae
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  • Profile picture of the author Zach Booker
    I semi-agree with Steven.

    I think using pop-ups or any cheesy marketing tactic when selling to marketers is just stupid.

    I personally do use pop-ups, and they work very well, in non-MMO niches.

    But I would never attach one to my own product in the MMO niche because, like Steven has said, it just turns people off.

    Zach
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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Ken Envoy talks about a site owners "Most Desired Action" (<--I think that's how he puts it).

      What he means is that for every page you have, you should have a most desired action. Whether it's getting an opt-in, making a sale, getting an adsense click, etc. Every page should have one single MDA.

      People navigating away isn't likely anyone's MDA. So they use these scripts as a final attempt to divert people to what their MDA is. If 1,000 people click to navigate away and the "WAIT" box gets just one to come back and complete the MDA, it has done it's job.

      Like it or not, how it makes "bouncers" feel is of little consequence. Because the statistics say that you're likely never coming back anyway. So pissing you (& 998 others like you) off to the point that you consciously say that you're not coming back is worth it in order to obtain a SINGLE MDA.

      So you should decide...

      Do you want everyone to like you (not gonna happen anyway), or do you want to do what's best for your business?

      Because believe it or not, even if somebody gets annoyed by a tactic of yours, they really don't spend that much time thinking about you.









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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Originally Posted by Zach Booker View Post

      I think using pop-ups or any cheesy marketing tactic when selling to marketers is just stupid.
      I would think that marketers would understand and appreciate what these other marketers are doing.

      Frankly, I'd feel better about my decision to leave another marketer's site if they were NOT using marketing tactis proven to boost conversions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Amy Carczak
    There's a clue there ...if everyone is doing it .. it might just be because it's working.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ross Bowring
      Originally Posted by Amy Carczak View Post

      There's a clue there ...if everyone is doing it .. it might just be because it's working.
      Amy hits the nail on the head.
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  • Profile picture of the author MYMINDSAYSIDO
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    • Profile picture of the author hyperlite
      I hate those things so much. I'm hesitant to even promote products that use it because it seems so scammy. I would never buy anything from a site that uses it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      What happens when more customers figure out the trick is often used to offer them a special deal - I've found loads of them that offer a reduced price on the product I was just looking at. That seems to be the main purpose of this particular popup. How convenient once you catch on!

      Would be interesting to know how many sales come through the popup as compared to the regular sales page - and whether adding the popup reduces sales through the normal sales page (at full price).

      The worst thing about that particular popup to me is that they all look exactly like.
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    • Profile picture of the author pappyy3
      I agree with everyone's comments. These "Wait don't leave" messages are instrusive and extremely annoying.

      I'm quite surprised they work at all, and in fact for those that offer something for free, I'll opt in, get the free product and them immediately un-subscribe from that particular list.

      Why?

      Because I'm annoyed!
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  • Profile picture of the author RogerH
    I can think of at least one instance where I took advantage of the "wait, don't go" offer.

    The original asking price was something like $47, but the "wait, don't go" offer was $19. I figured it wasn't worth $47, but it was worth $19, so I bought.

    In another case, an affiliate pointed out the fact that a product had a "wait, don't go" offer and encouraged people to buy that way rather than pay full price. I'm sure it cost him $$ per sale, but it saved his list members some cash and he may have made up for it in volume.

    -Roger
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    • Profile picture of the author Ruth Hendrickson
      I haven't used exit pages because I personally find them so annoying. But I have to admit to buying from one in the past. They're becoming almost common place now, it seems. Next time I go to buy something I must remember to exit the page first to see if there's a better deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author Online Bliss
    I agree with Kay King,

    Most sites that employ this script offer a discount and I always check
    to see what that discount is.
    I actually purchased the Virtual Assistant script but do not over use it.
    It's like using too many special effects in your videos.
    Use sparingly if at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author expertcapper
    I hate these scripts and its a huge turn off and screams some sort of spam or a phoney site to me for some reason. I would never use this script ever.
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  • Profile picture of the author Glenn72
    You need to play around with them a bit and you may get an even better deal. There was one popular product that was $47. I closed it and the pop up appeared offering it for $37. I still wasn't interested, but for some reason clicked the buy button out of curiosity. I then clicked the back button and a pop-up appeared again, but this time the price was $7. That seemed like a deal, so I bought it. As it turns out, the product wasn't that good, so $7 didn't actually seem like much of a bargain after all. There was plenty of bonus material though.

    As for the use of these scripts. I've just come to accept them as being a part of the whole internet marketing way of doing things, like the ugly sales pages they normally appear on with the big red text and 50 testimonials.
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  • Profile picture of the author timpears
    I, and I think most people don't buy on the first visit to a site. I have been to many a site that uses one of these pop ups and offers me $10 discount. So when i decide to buy and I go back, I know to click away to get the discount. I have got to a point where I click away just to see if they are going to offer me something.

    I hate pop ups as much as anyone, and even the ones that get me a discount are annoying. Butt it is all part of marketing and it is hard to get mad at someone for doing their job and trying to make the sale.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Chung
    In Beijing where I've been studying, when haggling one of the best tools you can use is the 'walk-away'. The merchant will usually cave in and sell to you if they are able to make a smaller profit at your asking price rather than letting you walk away and making no profit at all.

    Of course sometimes I'm just simply walking somewhere else and planning on coming back later, but the merchant doesn't know that, so they sometimes yell increasingly lower prices after me while I'm walking away to go to the bathroom.

    The exit pop-up in my mind is like that merchant trying to get you to buy before you leave. They don't know that you intend to come back later, in their mind something about the product or its price is not to your liking and caused you to walk away, so they try to sweeten the deal in an effort to make some profit. If you don't like it you just keep walking (or clicking), if you were planning on coming back then great, now you know you can get it for cheaper. I don't really see any reason to get upset over it.
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    • Profile picture of the author mystarter
      I tried it before and send visitors to CPA offer but none of them converted to lead/sale.

      Need to revisit the strategy.
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  • Profile picture of the author GuerrillaIM
    SENuke use this for their OTO. It pops up a "are you sure you don't want it" type of message, then they hit you with another OTO and another pop up message.

    It's actually done quite well, even though it is annoying.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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    Just because they are leaving doesn't mean that they will not return. I guarantee you if you have one of those, I won't return. They annoy me. But I have purchased many things on the second or third or fourth visit to a site. Some people may be waiting for a paycheck or just haven't done enough research yet.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joshua.E1
      It depends, well you need to test whether this method works, if not you can leave this out.
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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      Just because they are leaving doesn't mean that they will not return. I guarantee you if you have one of those, I won't return. They annoy me. But I have purchased many things on the second or third or fourth visit to a site. Some people may be waiting for a paycheck or just haven't done enough research yet.


      We all have our preferences and comfort zones. The thing we must remember though is this...just because we feel a certain way and feel rather strongly about it, doesn't automatically mean we're in the majority.

      I'm not saying your way of thinking is wrong. Rather, I'm just offering an explanation as to why some people use this tactic even though it annoys you and others.

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  • Profile picture of the author silverbax
    Those pop-ups cost vendors thousands of dollars in affiliate sales because you can't direct link to those types of pages, so guys like me don't even bother to test.

    And I've run tests where it usually costs way more sales than it keeps because people think either

    a. the site is "one of THOSE" scam sites
    b. putting a virus on their machine.

    So arguments that you are grabbing an extra sale here and there completely ignore the fact that it may have cost them 50 sales to get that one. My sites are trying to build lifetime value out of a customer, and if I hit them with a pop up, I probably drive them away forever.

    It basically boils down to whether you are trying to grab every dollar TODAY with no plan for tomorrow or whether you are trying to build a sustainable, long term business with repeat customers, growth, etc.

    I'm sure it works for some people, but it always costs me way more in long term customers. They won't come back when you hit them with the pop up.

    My take is like this: you walk into an electronics to buy an MP3 player. But none of the MP3 players look good, or they are overpriced. There is nothing in the store you want to buy. You start to walk out of the door, but a salesman blocks the door, grabs you buy the arm to hold you, pulls your wallet out and tosses it away and maybe even locks the door closed and screams, "Wait! What if I gave you $10 off?" Now, true, some people might buy. But most people are going to pick up their wallet, leave and never EVER come back. And as silly as that might sound, that's exactly what vendors are doing to their customers online. When they see those garish pop ups, most users think 'Oh crap! a virus', or they think they can't get out of the site and/or they envision having to pay someone to fix their computer.
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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Originally Posted by silverbax View Post

      Those pop-ups cost vendors thousands of dollars in affiliate sales because you can't direct link to those types of pages, so guys like me don't even bother to test.
      Some vendors have a version without pop-ups for their affiliates as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author enterprise_seo
    Originally Posted by MJGrae View Post

    I was just curious, hoping maybe some fellow warriors could shed some light on this subject.

    There seems to be an abundance of landing pages that have the script where when the button is clicked to leave a website, a message pops up with the "WAIT!! I have something to offer you! etc etc, click ok to continue or cancel to stay on the same page"

    I honestly despise these pages and I was wondering if anyone can speak from personal experience if they DO in fact increase conversions?

    It seems everyone I speak to absolutely hates them and immediately leaves after the message pops up. But there HAS to be a method to the madness, so I figure SOMEONE has to have seen increased conversions?
    If I get one of those things not only do I click away from it as quickly as I can, but I also unsubscribe from the person who sent me the link in the email in the first place (and if I am a member of several lists of his/hers I unsubscribe from ALL of them).

    Look, if I want to leave a web page it means I'm not interested in it. It doesn't mean I want to look at another little window asking me if I'm sure I want to leave, and then sometimes another one after that....

    Bloody pain in the arse.
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  • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
    Not sure about other people, but my personal thoughts/opinions on these are that they are too invasive for me. I never buy anything the moment I go onto a sales page anyway (I look for reviews and judge the competition, etc, first), so if - when clicking off - I get these annoying messages, I just make a mental note to not purchase from such offers.
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  • Profile picture of the author applepie
    If I've decided not to buy, I still won't buy no matter what offer they're giving me through those pop-ups.
    If I'm interested but not ready to buy it on that point, I'll read what the offer is .. if it's like "We'd like to give you a free access to exclusive interview with bla.. bla.. bla..." and if it's of value I'll probably trade my email address for the bonus.

    But discounting through pop-ups are NOT good. It's diminishing the value of your product. One particular money making site I came across the other day offers the product for $49.95 then $17 on the first close, and $7 on the second (and last) close. I don't think this works. I do find it quite annoying instead ... but it's just me ;P
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  • Profile picture of the author eaglechick
    Obviously pro and cons. As a buyer I've encountered as many as 3 Wait - do'nt go's (on one webpage) and as already mentioned at a hugely reduced (discount) price. Desperate for a sale ? You bet. As a marketer I'm not in favor of pop-ups and this new sales trick. Everyone beats his own drum so to speak. You decide what you want to do with your business and how to do it. As finesse pointed out - my immediate reaction is : What is going on ? Why is this guy so eager to get rid of his stuff and why did'nt he offer it at the reduced price straight away.
    Yeah I know - marketing strategy. Some people may fall for that but if you've been in
    marketing for 20 years. Nope.
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  • Profile picture of the author LarryC
    Not only is it annoying, but it broadcasts the message that this product is no different from the hundreds of others that use the same gimmick.
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    What I know to be true is this...

    On niche sites outside the make-money market,
    I see a reliable 20-30% increase in opt-ins when
    adding a well designed "Wait, Don't Forget Your
    Free Gift!" email submit exit-pop with a good ecover.

    Sometimes the results are even better. I've even
    been thanked for the "reminder".

    You. Are. Not. Your. Market...

    You won't see many people posting here reporting
    sales going DOWN because of an exit script.

    But you will see lots of people griping about them
    as a consumer, some with great passion.

    Ok. Duly noted.

    I've put it down right here next to One-Time-Offers,
    Upsells, Downsells, Cross-Sells, Affiliate Promotions,
    Name Squeezes, Continuity, Video and On-Page Audio.

    Check.

    Best,

    Brian
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    • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post


      You. Are. Not. Your. Market...
      Brian, shhhhhhhh.. you're educatin' folks, man

      Ok. Duly noted.

      I've put it down right here next to One-Time-Offers,
      Upsells, Downsells, Cross-Sells, Affiliate Promotions,
      Name Squeezes, Continuity, Video and On-Page Audio.

      Check.

      Best,

      Brian
      LOL @ this....

      Peace

      Jay
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    • Profile picture of the author Mike Anthony
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post


      You won't see many people posting here reporting
      sales going DOWN because of an exit script.
      In this day and age its awfully difficult to track down second and third time visitor metrics. IPs change and cookies get removed. Besides I don't believe Steve is talking about a sales page only website.

      Its entirely niche and strategy related. The you are not your consumer argument is rehashed a lot when a number of people have an issue with something (usual dogma in the copywriting section) but these are consumers not just sellers.

      To me its all market research. I don't assume that one size is going to fit all. If I have a one shot never coming back sales page then it makes sense. If I have a strategy to get repeat visitors then it doesn't.
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  • Profile picture of the author wmark
    i click away almost immediately. I am almost immune to this kind of tactics. Even for sales pages, hardly read them. I just go to the buy button to see how much it cost. In the end, i check myself to see if i pulled my credit card to buy the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author eaglechick
    Salute to Steven Carl Kelly - rather concentrate on building a sustainable long
    lasting relationship with your customers. They are not stupid. This annoying
    little thing just smells like a ...... RAT!!!!
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
      Originally Posted by eaglechick View Post

      Salute to Steven Carl Kelly - rather concentrate on building a sustainable long lasting relationship with your customers. They are not stupid. This annoying little thing just smells like a ...... RAT!!!!
      The way I see it is: as long as I'm making a very nice living marketing in a way that I feel good about (building relationships, providing quality products at a reasonable price), there's no sense using marketing tactics that I don't feel good about.
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      • Profile picture of the author Stephen Crooks
        I find it incredibly annoying personally and wouldn't dream of using it on my sites. I wouldn't mind so much if you just had to click a big "no thanks" button to get rid of rather than having to work out if you need to press the OK or cancel button.

        Out of principle any site that employs these pop ups will not be getting my business.
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        • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
          Originally Posted by Steve Crooks View Post

          I find it incredibly annoying personally and wouldn't dream of using it on my sites. I wouldn't mind so much if you just had to click a big "no thanks" button to get rid of rather than having to work out if you need to press the OK or cancel button.

          Out of principle any site that employs these pop ups will not be getting my business.
          The technology is clumpy , I agree, it's so counter intuative, the whole "click cancel on the next page to continue" etc.

          I would love it if on exit you simply got a " Click Yes If you Would Like This Discount - Click NO , if you would like to leave".

          It would be vastly less annoying and vastly more effective for getting sales, even now we have people contact us who screwed up and tried to get the discount but pushed the wrong button.

          While it could certainly do with a clean up in operation, the truth is the concept, if implemented correctly is sound and perfectly ethical .

          Intellichat is an ok solution but I was never that impressed, there is s/w out there that's vastly superior and easy to configure with much more flexibility.
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  • Profile picture of the author Simon Stanley
    Yes as annoying as they may be, it will increase conversions no doubt.

    In my opinion you have to be selfish when it comes to this rather sensitive subject...as when the prospect leaves they will usually leave forever and will therefore me no use to you.

    This goes for opt-in pages too, once they decide to leave I hit them with a sales page for a $1 products, then $45 recurrs every month. I have generated some good sales from this technique.
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  • Profile picture of the author Viktor Bebel
    I immediately leave after the message pops up. It does not attract me at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author DogScout
    Their existence now makes me always click away from every offer to see if the price will go down. If it doesn't I leave anyway, if it does I leave because the guy took a 'shot' at me.
    (Of course I have also stopped buying anything ending in a '7' or on a squeeze page, too)
    LoL
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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Originally Posted by DogScout View Post

      Their existence now makes me always click away from every offer to see if the price will go down. If it doesn't I leave anyway, if it does I leave because the guy took a 'shot' at me.
      Sounds like a great use of your time. :p

      Seriously though, whey even visit the offer page to begin with then?
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
      Originally Posted by DogScout View Post

      Their existence now makes me always click away from every offer to see if the price will go down. If it doesn't I leave anyway, if it does I leave because the guy took a 'shot' at me.
      (Of course I have also stopped buying anything ending in a '7' or on a squeeze page, too)
      LoL
      Whew! I already stopped with the all 7's. Changed them all to 9's without any big drop in sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author DogScout
    And I unsubscribe from the list of the person that sent me there.
    (figured that was an important point)
    I know people that have been offered lower prices with these in other markets (they are not IMers) and for them, most tell me it reinforces that the decision they made not to buy was correct. Obviously, someone has tested it and found them to be of value in their market and I am betting 99% of the people that use them have never tested them in their market, they just 'assume' since there are so many, it must be good.

    It is like going to Google's #1 site in a market and copying it. You don't know that that company is losing $300 each sale and is either ready to go under or sells enough on follow-up and back-end sales to sustain the loss. If you have not tested it and are using it, well to be blunt, that is just stupid.

    Test, Test, Test. Then even if it annoys me and a bunch like me, you have tested it and KNOW it makes you more money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Clark
    If they were real Sales-driven Marketers then they'd remove the OK button (Ah-thank you!)

    Increased conversions are great as long the refund % doesn't have an adverse affect on the ROI when utilizing this tactic to discount the product's price point (down sell).

    Let's not forget about those who bought at first sight then returned to re-read the sales page/bounce then get offered a discount on the product they already purchased at full pop.

    Ohhh... that sinking feeling of being had... refund please!

    I'd be inclined to test it to see the real winner as I'm sure the results will vary from market to market especially the fickle MMO market.

    LoudMac's implementation is best as it builds an asset & affords you multiple chances to get the prospect to see the offer/sales page written in multiple ways via follow-up autoresponder which addresses quite a few prospect's preference of not buying at first sight... usually they're wanting more information to make an informed decision as opposed to an impulsive one.

    From there, the product owner can rip off the affiliate with their own sales link in the sequence but that's an entirely different thread altogether
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  • Profile picture of the author DogScout
    LOL Lance, yes why look? Because like a crow, it is in my nature. Sad but true. Truth sadder than fiction.
    But the 2nd post applys & if the customer ever returns to the site, your looking at a refund and then may or may not get a sale at the lower price from the refunded guy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Hesaidblissfully
      I'd think people would be just as annoyed by knowing that they ended up paying full price for something that they could've gotten for a $20 or more discount simply for clicking off the page as they would by the special offer box itself. I've never used those sorts of popups though. I always found the wording they use odd as well. Like it takes me a moment to figure out whether "ok" is agreeing with the offer, or allowing me to click off the page (I'm a bit slow sometimes )
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      • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
        Originally Posted by Hesaidblissfully View Post

        I'd think people would be just as annoyed by knowing that they ended up paying full price for something that they could've gotten for a $20 or more discount simply for clicking off the page
        I would think that was an extremely daft use of the technology, and liable to certainly end up with you getting angry customers etc.

        If you implement it right, your customers tend to be thankful rather than angry.
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  • Profile picture of the author VoodooMethods
    Gosh I really, really, really HATE those stupid pop ups. Especially when I'm just trying to find a decent looking LP to test out. Go to X out and get tricked by accident!

    I've gotten a sale or two from them though.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jared Alberghini
    Not to break up the enthralling "I hate them", "But they work" back and forth battle too much,

    What do you all think of the slide-up footer ads? like this one I have been working on:

    Affiliate Niche Monster - Footer Ad Demo

    I think they are quite cool... however I may be jaded, since I'm developing one...

    Back to your regularly scheduled program.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Jared,

      Not to break up the enthralling "I hate them", "But they work" back and forth battle too much,
      Splorf!

      What do you all think of the slide-up footer ads? like this one I have been working on:

      Affiliate Niche Monster - Footer Ad Demo

      I think they are quite cool... however I may be jaded, since I'm developing one...
      It totally reminds me of my displeasure while watching football on TV - advertisements encroaching from every possible angle, and it becoming harder and harder to actually focus on the game itself.

      Permanent logos in all four corners of the screen, obscuring the score and the time left (surprised they haven't discovered a fifth corner of the screen to advertise on yet).

      Two tiers of advertisement hoarding around the ground, with electronic, moving, dancing wording that totally blinds you when you watch a slo-mo replay.

      Adverts on and around the pitch using glorious 3D to make them look real.

      Adverts on the shirts, shorts, underwear and tattoos of the players and referee. Adverts on the fans. Adverts on the coffee cups of the fans. Adverts on the blimp above the ground.

      Adverts on the ball.

      Adverts on each blade of grass.

      Adverts on the oxygen in the air.

      The program sponsor. The sponsor of the program sponsor. The sponsor of the programme sponsor's dog and ex-wife. The sponsor of the advertising break. The sponsor of the streaker. The sponsor of the pitch invasion. Advertising on the stewards who halt the pitch invasion....:rolleyes:

      And don't let me get started on the annoying tweaking of the volume level of the adverts in the numerous advertising breaks, which cause me to burn out the batteries in my remote control (batteries sponsored by...)

      Hi Voodoomethods,

      Gosh I really, really, really HATE those stupid pop ups. Especially when I'm just trying to find a decent looking LP to test out. Go to X out and get tricked by accident!

      I've gotten a sale or two from them though.
      No comment...
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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      I like them too.

      They're still pretty fresh though. But they are pretty unobtrusive, so I don't see any reason to dislike them.



      Originally Posted by Jared Alberghini View Post

      Not to break up the enthralling "I hate them", "But they work" back and forth battle too much,

      What do you all think of the slide-up footer ads? like this one I have been working on:

      Affiliate Niche Monster - Footer Ad Demo

      I think they are quite cool... however I may be jaded, since I'm developing one...

      Back to your regularly scheduled program.
      Signature
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      ~ Zig Ziglar
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      • Profile picture of the author Ross Bowring
        Those footers are real nice. Unobtrusive yet impossible to ignore.
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  • Profile picture of the author richnicol.co.uk
    Im 50/50 on the popup when i leave the site, it does intrigue me that there may be a better offer (cheaper price etc), but it frustrates me because i have clicked off the site in the first place because i was not interested in the product. I imagine it must generate more sales done correctly unless all these websites would not use it
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  • Profile picture of the author kenboss
    Before I utter a word here, I want to say that from the point of view of aesthetics, online experience, and the sheer joy of living, I agree agree agree, those things are ANNOYING! Grrrrr! and all that! I'm with you, I hear you Brothers and Sisters!

    BUT!

    'You Are Not Your Market' is a great mantra, too often ignored.

    And yes, the attitude of not wanting to piss people off by adopting that style even if it makes more money is laudable, but is it really rooted in reality? Do they really get that pissed off?

    Consider this: Brian MacLeod raises another really important point when he mentions "niche sites outside the make-money market".

    The REASON so many of us marketers get ultra annoyed by all kinds of devices used to grab our attention, our email addresses, and yes, even our cash IS: we see it so OFTEN! By the very nature of our business, many of us, especially new to the game and still (come on, admit it now!) serial shoppers when it comes to IM products, are likely to be looking at conservative 10 to 20 sales pages a day. So YEAH - it's going to annoy the heck out of you - it does me too! - when you are seeing one of these pop-ups for the 12th time.

    Whereas people in normal, civilized niches, people who are surfing for a nice ebook on How To Shave Your Cat, don't see this every day and don't get anywhere near as annoyed. They do often however, like seeing the price lowered before their very eyes by a pretty girl in a box offering to shave the price of cat shaving. Seriously, they do!

    But let's step back and look at this. Let's even return to the IM niche: with the greatest respect to everyone here, lots of people will post on this forum insisting that they will not buy, have never bought, will always steer clear of, etc. They post this BECAUSE they hope it will stop people doing it.

    First of all: it probabaly won't. In the marketer's ears, conversion figures talk louder than forum posters.

    Second: Be honest! Can you honestly say that you have always totally refused to buy products you would otherwise have considered, simply because they had an exit popup? Or ... can you honestly say that you have never reconsidered, after seeing an intriguing product's $37 price tag reduced to a mere $17?? - even though you had to endure the 5-second horror of Nancy the virtual assistant to find this out?

    I bet not. But if you really do answer yes to those questions, then you really are cutting off your face to spite your nose :confused:

    We are all, presumably on the same page when it comes to what we are searching for: great value for less money. If you see a product that you believe will solve your problem, and you think it's a fair price, and then you are suddenly told (by dear sweet brainless Nancy or Bob) that you can have it for half the quoted price - is it really WISE to walk away, just so you can punish the marketer for bugging you with a pop-up?

    In effect all you are saying to the marketer is: don't bother offering good quality for less money, because I don't want to know.

    Don't get me wrong. We are right to make our feelings known about these things, and this forum is the best place to do it. But we can't argue with these guys when they say it makes money, because it really does.

    Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
    I implemented it for a client, we offered a trial version of the main product at a vastly reduced price.

    We increased sales by about 22% , adding tens of thousands monthly to the bottom line.

    I don't find them irratating at all , infact I purposely go and check every one out I come across to see their version of the implementation but I would think Joe Bloggs would find them quite irratating.

    On the other hand he has dozens of customers a week thanking him for the chance to get hold of his product "cheap".

    I won't put them on my own sites as I have a closer relationship with my customers, but for somebody in a niche where it's more of a one off gig and they are more interested in the bottom line, not only do they work if configured correctly they can add serious revenue to your income.
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  • Profile picture of the author davebo
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
      Originally Posted by davebo View Post


      But the way that most Warriors feign outrage over a lot of things here, you'd think that this was a charity. I suspect that most people talk a bigger game than the actual practice.
      Tend to agree, the holier than thou contingent do at times tend to get up my nose. The simplest of marketing techniques turns into the moral equivalent of cookie stuffing.
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  • Profile picture of the author peetred
    I personally prefer a down sell or bonus offer pop-up instead, that gives a special offer if they are going to leave... and they can choose to look at it or click "no thanx". A little bit less offensive I think, and they hopefully getting a good offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Freeman77
    Wouldn't it suck if every time you tried to shut down a program, you got a "Wait, don't go!" screen? Well, actually that does happen quite a lot. For example, when I close Firefox I get a "Are you sure you want to exit all your tabs" message. Or if I exit a game I get, "Are you sure you want to leave" (sometimes games even taunt you for leaving).
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
    If I used any sort of intrusive device, it would be the slide-up footer as in Jared's demo. Those meet my personal standards of not being too intrusive yet commanding attention and not creating a new dialog box or opening an additional window.
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    I understand why people hate them. But it's a game and if you play it you can profit. Even on pages where I really want a product, I will alway click out to see how much of a discount they will give me. It's often 10 or 20 dollars. If vendors throw that up in your face, take advantage of it.

    I don't mean to criticize, and I know the vendor for this product is a fine and decent man, but he has a top-selling Clickbank product right now and you have to go through 10--that's not a misprint--you have to go through a series of ten offers to finally click out of his page. That's ludicrous. One or two--maybe, but 10--come on.

    Some of those scripts will burn affiliate links as well. Some don't. But if you are an affiliate sending traffic to a page and people hook up with the discount pop-up your commission evaporates. Now, the vendor and virtual agent company will tell you that the person was clicking out anyway so you wouldn't have gotten the commission--but still, it was your work and expense that got them there and you end up with nothing to show for it.

    There are many affiliates who simply won't promote a product if the exit pop-up burns their affiliate ID and commission. --Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author Christian York
    I absolutely hate those things!

    On one launch recently, I had to click out literally 10 times before i was able to leave their page. In a case like that I would imagine it would really annoy potential customers and therefore decrease conversions.

    But if used properly, they can give the customers a benefit and also increase your conversions.
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