Does Affiliate Disclosure Helps or Hurts your Selling?

13 replies
Hey,

It is required by the FTC that you should include an Affiliate disclosure statement in your website if you are promoting affiliate offers.

A lot of websites use a statement that look like this...

''If you bought from one of our affiliate links, we may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you, thank you for your support...''


My Question is - Does this Affiliate Disclosure statement Helps build and increase trust and conversion or does it actually hurts your conversion?
#affiliate #disclosure #helps #hurts #selling
  • Profile picture of the author Adrian Jock
    Originally Posted by CityCowboy View Post

    My Question is - Does this Affiliate Disclosure statement Helps build and increase trust and conversion or does it actually hurts your conversion?
    I guess it depends on the niche.

    If you're into a non-IM niche, let's say the dog training niche, it's not really unlikely to scare the people with your disclaimer. Something like... "I don't know what that affiliate thing is, but I hope it doesn't hurt my dog!"

    Anyway, irrespective whether the disclaimer hurts your conversions or not, if FTC jurisdiction applies to you, you should comply with their rules. It's better
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    • Profile picture of the author CityCowboy
      Originally Posted by Adrian Jock View Post

      I guess it depends on the niche.

      If you're into a non-IM niche, let's say the dog training niche, it's not really unlikely to scare the people with your disclaimer. Something like... "I don't know what that affiliate thing is, but I hope it doesn't hurt my dog!"

      Anyway, irrespective whether the disclaimer hurts your conversions or not, if FTC jurisdiction applies to you, you should comply with their rules. It's better
      Interesting! In Non-IM niches people don't know what an Affiliate means, so basically when they click on your Affiliate link they think it's just a normal genuine link, so it will look weird to explain what an Affiliate Compliance Disclosure is
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      • Profile picture of the author Adrian Jock
        Originally Posted by CityCowboy View Post

        Interesting! In Non-IM niches people don't know what an Affiliate means, so basically when they click on your Affiliate link they think it's just a normal genuine link, so it will look weird to explain what an Affiliate Compliance Disclosure is
        I haven't read the FTC rules, but I guess you aren't forced to use tech language (such as "affiliate links"). If you have to add such a disclaimer, you can rephrase it and use a common language everyone understands.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
        Originally Posted by CityCowboy View Post

        Interesting! In Non-IM niches people don't know what an Affiliate means, so basically when they click on your Affiliate link they think it's just a normal genuine link, so it will look weird to explain what an Affiliate Compliance Disclosure is
        Nonsense... people are a lot smarter than that. Most everyone
        knows what an affiliate is in internet commerce.

        To answer the original question... it depends on how you word
        the disclaimer but... most of all... it depends on the relationship
        you have with your market.
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by Tsnyder View Post

          Nonsense... people are a lot smarter than that. Most everyone
          knows what an affiliate is in internet commerce.

          To answer the original question... it depends on how you word
          the disclaimer but... most of all... it depends on the relationship
          you have with your market.
          Adding to this, people know that you aren't running a website, providing content, etc. for your own kicks. They know that you are trying to make money.

          Acknowledging that, and disclosing that you've picked a way to make money that doesn't cost them anything, can work in your favor. You still have to provide value and build trust, but the affiliate disclosure won't hurt you if you do it right.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    If you consistently provide valuable content, a conspicuous affiliate disclosure beyond FTC and affiliate network requirements can instill a sense of reciprocity in your audience which often results in dramatic conversion rates.

    What I also frequently will do is insert a "donation" button (a la Jimmy Wales with Wikipedia) in addition to regular affiliate product offers. This appeal (ie to help defray production costs) works exceptionally well.
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  • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
    I think disclosing that you're an affiliate builds trust. I have never not bought something because someone disclosed they are an affiliate.

    Further, most affiliate programs require disclosure. Amazon, for one, is pretty strict about it.

    I think it's just good business to be as transparent as possible.
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  • Profile picture of the author joncoates89
    I only feel as if you are providing a TON of value,
    and you are genuinely giving the reader the
    experience he was looking for and
    answering his questions with satisfaction to their perception.

    Also if you are emotionally appealing to the reader, I just feel like..

    I feel as if those will only bring you credibility points because you are being transparent plus you are over delivering in you value from their percieved point of view.

    I think it also go based off how the readers feel about you personally.
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  • Profile picture of the author trobo
    As far as I'm concerned, since it's required by the FTC, it's not really worth worrying about. There's nothing you can do about anyway, and not putting it on there is breaking the law.

    I think most intelligent people would appreciate your honesty and it would build trust.

    The others who would be turned off by it you probably don't want to be dealing with anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author marks2424
    I hate to sound stupid but is this something new, I have never read anything saying the FTC requires an affiliate statement and if it is true then I have been breaking the law for years.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
      Originally Posted by marks2424 View Post

      I hate to sound stupid but is this something new, I have never read anything saying the FTC requires an affiliate statement and if it is true then I have been breaking the law for years.
      Welcome to several years ago. Yes, the FTC requires that
      you notify buyers if you will receive compensation when they
      buy from your link.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gambino
    I'm not an affiliate marketer but if I come across a "review" online of a product I'm thinking about buying and it has an affiliate link I pretty much ignore the review and take it with a grain of salt.

    The only caveat to that is if there's a note saying "this is an affiliate link..." and the site also has bad reviews of products. Let's face it, not every product is great as some would have us believe.
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    It could go either way, I'd recommend split testing a page with it against s page without it and see if there is a difference
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