Have you ever treated your CLIENT as a FRIEND?

33 replies
Every now and then, I get a message: Thank you (my) friend!

When a client says or writes something like this, it usually means that I delivered something much earlier than expected, I introduced a shocking discount, I accepted to work on the revision #7, or something more or less similar, which strongly benefits to my client.

I respect professional lines both visible and invisible ones. I know a little bit of German, btw. So, when I talk to my German clients, you can feel this difference between the formal and informal tone of conversation and addressing. This isn't the case in the English language. Not to mention the use of first names in business correspondence and communication.

You work. You get paid. You move on. You enjoy more or less working with some of the clients. You end up with good or bad memories. Yet, I'm telling you, more than once, for some of the guys I worked with, I thought: in some other universe, under some other circumstances, we could be good friends. I mean it.

So, have you ever crossed the line? I did and regretted it. When the money knocks at the door, friendship jumps out of the window. I got carried away and ended up being heavily exploited. Do you have to be like a machine all the time? I would like to hear and compare some of other warrior's experiences about this one. Thx.
#business #client #friend #relationship #treated
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by maxsi View Post

      Strongly benefits = you have a customer for life
      Thx Maxsi, building a long term relationship is a true challenge. All we need is a little bit of gratitude and positive vibes, from time to time. I'm not saying that you should be paid for every extra mile you're ready to go for your client. Right now, I'm finishing a small part of a landing page. This project is completed. I got my money. Yet, my client missed one small part. So, I said, it's on the house. It's really not such a big deal. At least not for me. Let's see how I'm gonna be treated on our next project. I'm not gonna ask money. Just gonna sit and wait what's gonna happen. Will let you know. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. N
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      • Profile picture of the author LicenseStore
        Hello neshaword,

        I read your views and thoughts.

        I believe there should be a thin line between making a client your complete buddy and keeping it balanced. Off course being friendly to your customers attracts them towards you for the next time. But lets take an example of what you did in your project as you mentioned above " my client missed one small part. So, I said, it's on the house" for the next time the same client will expect some kind of discount or negotiation which may or may not be possible for you depending upon the situation, which will lead your client to disappointment if you fail to agree as per his/her negotiations. I don't mean to be judgmental here, just sharing some experience.
        Thank you
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        • Profile picture of the author neshaword
          Excellent point. The road to hell is paved with good intentions and free work, LOL. This "thin line" you mentioned is a killer. You realize how tricky my situation is. I'm extremely grateful for it. I had a choice.

          On the one side, I could've charged extra. But hey, this was such an insignificant amount compared to the payment I already got for the main work. I was afraid that my client would say, c'mon Nesha, do you really need to charge me for this, after all we've done together. On the other side, I thought this could be a "thoughtful sacrifice."

          However, you made me think. Now, I question my decision. The last thing I wanna do is to lose my client. Maybe it was better to be professional and say, OK, this was additional work, it costs, pay me, thank you, next project please. Now, I'm really afraid that this situation may lead to my client's disappointment.

          I should've known better.

          Thanks for sharing. Much appreciated.

          Nesha

          Originally Posted by LicenseStore View Post

          Hello neshaword,

          I read your views and thoughts.

          I believe there should be a thin line between making a client your complete buddy and keeping it balanced. Off course being friendly to your customers attracts them towards you for the next time. But lets take an example of what you did in your project as you mentioned above " my client missed one small part. So, I said, it's on the house" for the next time the same client will expect some kind of discount or negotiation which may or may not be possible for you depending upon the situation, which will lead your client to disappointment if you fail to agree as per his/her negotiations. I don't mean to be judgmental here, just sharing some experience.
          Thank you
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  • Profile picture of the author Junaid khawaja
    Hi Neshaword, i can strongly relate to this. There are number of times i have been exploited to do unnecessary hardwork just in a fury to create an ever lasting relationship. I remember one of my client wasting my hours and hours sitting on skype and doing revisions - exploiting my "relationship building" argument in a gruesome way. What we need to understand is a fact that our time is precious and we need to charge money for each minute we are putting in. Business is business and thus we should avoid establishing one-sided relations with our clients. My opinion on this is UNLESS IT'S A MUTUAL GIVE AND TAKE WHERE BOTH ARE BENEFITTING EQUALLY, THERE IS NO WRONG IN CALLING YOUR CLIENTS "FRIENDS." Otherwise, it's a big No!
    Thanks for raising such a nice question. New freelancers especially need to know'this before they fall into this "relationship-building" rhetoric. Cheers!

    Junaid.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Junaid,

      You're so right! And your Skype example. How can I forget? I agreed with my client to have a "short" presentation, just to get to know his company better. It took 2 hours. This guy obviously loves the sound of his own voice. Finally, I said, look I have to go. I have other projects to work on. He was like, OK, I don't mind. Do you think he even asked to compensate me for my time, out of courtesy, at least? No and no!

      Then, it's better to forget about friendship and focus strictly on business. If a client is a true professional he won't mind if you ask to be paid for every single minute of your time. If you respect my work, then you'll express your respect with a payment. I can say, I offer work for free or ridiculously small price, in the matter of minutes dozens of clients would become my best friends, that's for sure.

      Unless it's not mutual - it's not beneficial. Right?

      Appreciated. Thx.
      Nesha

      Originally Posted by Junaid khawaja View Post

      Hi Neshaword, i can strongly relate to this. There are number of times i have been exploited to do unnecessary hardwork just in a fury to create an ever lasting relationship. I remember one of my client wasting my hours and hours sitting on skype and doing revisions - exploiting my "relationship building" argument in a gruesome way. What we need to understand is a fact that our time is precious and we need to charge money for each minute we are putting in. Business is business and thus we should avoid establishing one-sided relations with our clients. My opinion on this is UNLESS IT'S A MUTUAL GIVE AND TAKE WHERE BOTH ARE BENEFITTING EQUALLY, THERE IS NO WRONG IN CALLING YOUR CLIENTS "FRIENDS." Otherwise, it's a big No!
      Thanks for raising such a nice question. New freelancers especially need to know'this before they fall into this "relationship-building" rhetoric. Cheers!

      Junaid.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Hi,

    Money is just an energy. We give money energy its value. I treat all clients like friends yet I detach from them too. So it's like, I don't think much about the money yet in the same regard I keep kinda detached from any one client because my source isn't the client, but something bigger

    Money is funny. We have so many weird beliefs about it when in the end it's a means of exchange and nothing else. Few see money like this so all the warped beliefs about this energy which is just a means of exchange and nothing more, those ideas manifest as distrust, or fear, or resentment, or all types of negative stuff which tends to lead to struggle and other issues with money and businesses.

    I figure, act as detached as possible yet be warm and loving and helpful with all clients. I count all clients I vibe with as friends and the rest I released. When someone feels like a friend to me the money issue is not an issue, because friendship reigns. And of course, we trust one another so the payment comes through and we've a mutual understanding of what's expected in the partnership.

    Neat post

    Signing off from sunny Cyprus.

    Ryan Biddulph
    Blogging From Paradise
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Sunny Cyprus is to blame for these adorable positive vibes, lol. Yet, you're right. With such a positive attitude, no wonder you don't talk about problems. On the other hand, I will try to apply some of your suggestions, but I'm not sure how far could I possibly go. You have to play this tricky game of trust. Get close, but not too closer. Be friendly, but not too friendly. At some point this can drive you mad. Yet, what can you do about it for real? You can't be a cold heartless machine all the time, can you?

      Interesting and useful comment. Appreciated. Need to find some better place to write my threads and comments, lol.

      Cheers,
      Nesha

      Originally Posted by ryanbiddulph View Post

      Hi,

      Money is just an energy. We give money energy its value. I treat all clients like friends yet I detach from them too. So it's like, I don't think much about the money yet in the same regard I keep kinda detached from any one client because my source isn't the client, but something bigger

      Money is funny. We have so many weird beliefs about it when in the end it's a means of exchange and nothing else. Few see money like this so all the warped beliefs about this energy which is just a means of exchange and nothing more, those ideas manifest as distrust, or fear, or resentment, or all types of negative stuff which tends to lead to struggle and other issues with money and businesses.

      I figure, act as detached as possible yet be warm and loving and helpful with all clients. I count all clients I vibe with as friends and the rest I released. When someone feels like a friend to me the money issue is not an issue, because friendship reigns. And of course, we trust one another so the payment comes through and we've a mutual understanding of what's expected in the partnership.

      Neat post

      Signing off from sunny Cyprus.

      Ryan Biddulph
      Blogging From Paradise
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  • Profile picture of the author BellaZee
    I think it really depends on how you define a friend. I mean you can have a friend with whom you share everything and feel comfortable talking about anything, including things like the baby being colicky or your significant other forgetting your birthday, and then there are people whom you have a friendly relationship with. You know, the kinds of relationships where you discuss innocuous things like the latest movie you saw but it never goes beyond that.

    It's hard for a client to become a true friend simply because they usually have an agenda, which doesn't necessarily include gaining a new friend. So, while you can certainly build friendly relationships, I think it's rare to build a true friendship.

    That being said, I have had one case where I've become good friends with a client and money has never been an issue.

    And you can be exploited without trying to be a client's friend. I've had multiple situations where I've spent hours explaining to a client what they should be doing without receiving compensation for it. Yes, it's my fault. I should just do the job and move on, but there's this part of me that just won't let me move on without saying something like: if you do it this way, you're just wasting your time and money.

    I might be naïve, but at least I can look at myself in the mirror and not feel like a total heel. In the end, what you put into life, you get out of it. However, if a client does start getting too time-intensive and greedy, then I move on because that's the point where I start getting irritated, which only leads to ulcers.

    Then again, this approach has helped me generate new business simply because clients get the idea that I really do have their best interests at heart.

    So, am I wasting my time or am I doing the right thing? I don't know but I doubt I'll change simply because it's the way I've always been. I'll always go out of my way to help someone and if that means I'm a gullible fool, so be it.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Need to read this comment more than once, that's for sure, lol. Thank you Bella. This is a great Good Karma attitude. I'm not afraid, and yes, I wanna feel good about myself and my actions. So, if a client is building a business empire on hours he or she steals from freelancers, independent contractors, small companies, etc, let it be. Let's see how far this attitude will take them.

      I'm also deeply disappointed when I hear an excuse, oh I have to be a bad man, because all people I know and care for treated me badly. Just because one client tried to take an advantage of my willingness to help and not to look at the watch all the time, it doesn't mean I'm gonna change my attitude. I just remembered something, but I really hope I won't have to use. With friends like these, who needs enemies, lol. This was great thank you.

      Originally Posted by BellaZee View Post

      I think it really depends on how you define a friend. I mean you can have a friend with whom you share everything and feel comfortable talking about anything, including things like the baby being colicky or your significant other forgetting your birthday, and then there are people whom you have a friendly relationship with. You know, the kinds of relationships where you discuss innocuous things like the latest movie you saw but it never goes beyond that.

      It's hard for a client to become a true friend simply because they usually have an agenda, which doesn't necessarily include gaining a new friend. So, while you can certainly build friendly relationships, I think it's rare to build a true friendship.

      That being said, I have had one case where I've become good friends with a client and money has never been an issue.

      And you can be exploited without trying to be a client's friend. I've had multiple situations where I've spent hours explaining to a client what they should be doing without receiving compensation for it. Yes, it's my fault. I should just do the job and move on, but there's this part of me that just won't let me move on without saying something like: if you do it this way, you're just wasting your time and money.

      I might be naïve, but at least I can look at myself in the mirror and not feel like a total heel. In the end, what you put into life, you get out of it. However, if a client does start getting too time-intensive and greedy, then I move on because that's the point where I start getting irritated, which only leads to ulcers.

      Then again, this approach has helped me generate new business simply because clients get the idea that I really do have their best interests at heart.

      So, am I wasting my time or am I doing the right thing? I don't know but I doubt I'll change simply because it's the way I've always been. I'll always go out of my way to help someone and if that means I'm a gullible fool, so be it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Profit Traveler
    Interesting post neshaword.

    I actually do consider all my customers friends because they gave me a little more trust than average in my opinion.

    But I think it is human nature even if we have a set of rules to keep things professional as possible some people just break the mold and unique connections are made.

    When we see a particular warrior give and give and give here at the warrior forum for years with quality contributions then find out they are in dire situation and in need I have seen people step up unlike any other forums

    There are some actual warriors I have gotten more close to than some of my own blood relatives and I have never even physically met them and been close friends for past 7 years.

    Some customers, warriors, clients have actually saved my hide before and I think I can honestly say I have saved a few of theirs as well.

    So like one of my old University Professors used to say I give people an A grade at the start but what they end up with will be up to them.

    Art
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Art,

      Earlier this day, I read a thread + article about something called - Sustained Appreciation Level (SAL). It sounds like a rocket science, but it's actually quite simple, lol.

      So, you have people, freelancers, warriors, it's in our nature obviously, who keep getting some things, help, attention, etc. The trouble is you give or do something 99 times and just once, you fail to do or comply with someone's expectations, you're all bad. The worst part is that they treat you as if you've never done something good for them. So, not being grateful and thoughtful toward other people is a great issue in both private and personal life.

      Of all of my 700 or 800 clients in my freelance career I met only one guy in person. This guy moved somewhere in Europe I think. He was like, I'm planning some long term. So, lemme pay you a visit. Believe it or not, he flew to see me. Spend the night a local hotel. The next day he was gone. I thought this guy was crazy. We spend the next three years working together without a single problem. Guess, he meant serious business. This is why, he's moving around the world. The last time I checked he owns and runs 3 successful companies with only him knows how many freelancers and full-time workers. You said it yourself, compared to some of my lovely blood relatives he was a jackpot, lol.

      What makes me happy are these positive experiences and an honest faith in the power of relationship based on truth and appreciation. This thread is more or less interesting, but your comment Art is a life-safer.

      Thx and appreciated at the top SAL level, lol.

      Cheers,
      N

      Originally Posted by Profit Traveler View Post

      Interesting post neshaword.

      I actually do consider all my customers friends because they gave me a little more trust than average in my opinion.

      But I think it is human nature even if we have a set of rules to keep things professional as possible some people just break the mold and unique connections are made.

      When we see a particular warrior give and give and give here at the warrior forum for years with quality contributions then find out they are in dire situation and in need I have seen people step up unlike any other forums

      There are some actual warriors I have gotten more close to than some of my own blood relatives and I have never even physically met them and been close friends for past 7 years.

      Some customers, warriors, clients have actually saved my hide before and I think I can honestly say I have saved a few of theirs as well.

      So like one of my old University Professors used to say I give people an A grade at the start but what they end up with will be up to them.

      Art
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      • Profile picture of the author Profit Traveler
        Originally Posted by neshaword View Post

        Art,

        Earlier this day, I read a thread + article about something called - Sustained Appreciation Level (SAL). It sounds like a rocket science, but it's actually quite simple, lol.

        So, you have people, freelancers, warriors, it's in our nature obviously, who keep getting some things, help, attention, etc. The trouble is you give or do something 99 times and just once, you fail to do or comply with someone's expectations, you're all bad. The worst part is that they treat you as if you've never done something good for them. So, not being grateful and thoughtful toward other people is a great issue in both private and personal life.

        Of all of my 700 or 800 clients in my freelance career I met only one guy in person. This guy moved somewhere in Europe I think. He was like, I'm planning some long term. So, lemme pay you a visit. Believe it or not, he flew to see me. Spend the night a local hotel. The next day he was gone. I thought this guy was crazy. We spend the next three years working together without a single problem. Guess, he meant serious business. This is why, he's moving around the world. The last time I checked he owns and runs 3 successful companies with only him knows how many freelancers and full-time workers. You said it yourself, compared to some of my lovely blood relatives he was a jackpot, lol.

        What makes me happy are these positive experiences and an honest faith in the power of relationship based on truth and appreciation. This thread is more or less interesting, but your comment Art is a life-safer.

        Thx and appreciated at the top SAL level, lol.

        Cheers,
        N

        What an incredible story. Thanks for sharing.

        It is amazing the positive events that can take place amidst the male marketers with sexy female avatars, the generous Multi-Million dollar offers from Nigeria, the dog eat dog you do all the work and I will just snipe/copy/reverse engineer it mentality we have to endure online.

        No doubt about it we have to keep our Star Trek shields operational but also some special things can happen every now and then when we allow them to.

        Art
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        • Profile picture of the author neshaword
          Originally Posted by Profit Traveler View Post

          What an incredible story. Thanks for sharing.

          It is amazing the positive events that can take place amidst the male marketers with sexy female avatars, the generous Multi-Million dollar offers from Nigeria, the dog eat dog you do all the work and I will just snipe/copy/reverse engineer it mentality we have to endure online.

          No doubt about it we have to keep our Star Trek shields operational but also some special things can happen every now and then when we allow them to.

          Art
          Beam me up Scotty, lol.

          Unfortunately, this is one in a million story. That's the most troubling part. So, it's not the rule, but rather an exception. Shields up, but there's still a hope, I would like to say a new hope, but that would influence the genre, lol. I'm ready to both make and embrace the positive exceptions. Let's see how long we have to wait for the next one.

          Cheers!
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  • Profile picture of the author hichamaziz
    for me we must treat client like king
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by hichamaziz View Post

      for me we must treat client like king
      Of course, we have to, they're paying the bills. Yet, there should be some reciprocity, at least at the basic level. Otherwise, you're gonna end up in tears and with no money to cover your invested time, which is exactly what happened to me at the beginning of my freelance career.

      Just give it a thought. And remember, if clients are kings, then we are knights, and we should be treated as such.

      Cheers,
      N
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Nesha, there are "business" friends, and there are "friend" friends. Be careful not to mix the two.

    Back when I was working with clients, two words helped keep my "business" friends business friends.

    Fee Waived.

    In a situation like you described, I would add the extra item to the invoice along with the standard rate. But when I computed the total, I would mark the line item "Fee Waived" with an asterisk. At the asterisk, I would note that doing the added bit of work was easier and faster for me during the original project than doing so later. Because of this, I waived the charge.

    The phrasing is key.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      J,

      Those are some dangerous" mixtures," lol. Yes, I tend to easily lose my way. Some of the "business friends" were unsuccessful versions of my "friend friends." For what is worth, at least I didn't try to turn my friend friends into business friends. Not yet, lol.

      Who is to blame me? I spent almost a decade in sales. If you're looking for fake friends this is the right place to start. Our trainings, treat your customer as if he or she is your best friend. Maybe, they "damaged" me somehow. I don't know, not quite sure.

      I also have this naive thought, I am gonna go this extra mile, and you are gonna say, great, lemme give you something extra to compensate your time and efforts. You don't get even a simple "thank you." So, I guess, I have a lot of reconstruction work to do in my own head.

      Thx J. Stay in touch.

      Cheers,
      Nesha

      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      Nesha, there are "business" friends, and there are "friend" friends. Be careful not to mix the two.

      Back when I was working with clients, two words helped keep my "business" friends business friends.

      Fee Waived.

      In a situation like you described, I would add the extra item to the invoice along with the standard rate. But when I computed the total, I would mark the line item "Fee Waived" with an asterisk. At the asterisk, I would note that doing the added bit of work was easier and faster for me during the original project than doing so later. Because of this, I waived the charge.

      The phrasing is key.
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  • Profile picture of the author O0o0O
    That's a great question. I do treat some of my customers like a friend, however it depends on the personality I am dealing with. If the person it is results driven and numbers driven, then I don't necessarily do with a friendly approach. Instead I match his or her personality. The people I do treat like a friend are people who like to be recognized for their accomplishments, and like to be praised, by seeking positive comments from their friends. These people, when behaved towards as a friend, will be more likely to buy because they can relate to you more.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by O0o0O View Post

      That's a great question. I do treat some of my customers like a friend, however it depends on the personality I am dealing with. If the person it is results driven and numbers driven, then I don't necessarily do with a friendly approach. Instead I match his or her personality. The people I do treat like a friend are people who like to be recognized for their accomplishments, and like to be praised, by seeking positive comments from their friends. These people, when behaved towards as a friend, will be more likely to buy because they can relate to you more.
      It depends on the personality, this one says it all. What you give is what you can expect to get in return. And yes, I keep pushing this friendly button, because it's much better and far more enjoyable to work in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere as long as it is honest.Thx.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    I help them solve their problems at a very fair price...that's pretty friendly.
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  • Profile picture of the author terinah14
    Originally Posted by neshaword View Post

    Every now and then, I get a message: Thank you (my) friend!

    When a client says or writes something like this, it usually means that I delivered something much earlier than expected, I introduced a shocking discount, I accepted to work on the revision #7, or something more or less similar, which strongly benefits to my client.

    I respect professional lines both visible and invisible ones. I know a little bit of German, btw. So, when I talk to my German clients, you can feel this difference between the formal and informal tone of conversation and addressing. This isn't the case in the English language. Not to mention the use of first names in business correspondence and communication.

    You work. You get paid. You move on. You enjoy more or less working with some of the clients. You end up with good or bad memories. Yet, I'm telling you, more than once, for some of the guys I worked with, I thought: in some other universe, under some other circumstances, we could be good friends. I mean it.

    So, have you ever crossed the line? I did and regretted it. When the money knocks at the door, friendship jumps out of the window. I got carried away and ended up being heavily exploited. Do you have to be like a machine all the time? I would like to hear and compare some of other warrior's experiences about this one. Thx.
    I am not sure how you can tell if your client is treating you as a friend. Most of my clients treat me really well, but I make sure that we both are treating each other professionally. I can say that I have good relationship with my clients as long as we don't cross the line.

    One time, I had one client who I feel is being to attached. He even left a long review on my public profile (Fiverr) to let others know how good I am. He wouldn't stop messaging me on Skype and LinkedIn asking me to do something for a cheap price. I just told him that I can't do business with him anymore.
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  • Profile picture of the author enjamulahsan
    Banned
    Yes, if you can treat your client as like as friend, You can convert your buyer to a regular customer as well, This would be beneficial. I always try keeping good communications with my clients and clients satisfaction is my motivation.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by enjamulahsan View Post

      Yes, if you can treat your client as like as friend, You can convert your buyer to a regular customer as well, This would be beneficial. I always try keeping good communications with my clients and clients satisfaction is my motivation.
      Client's satisfaction is also my strongest motivation, but I would like to hear more from you. Is it always ideal as it is right now, or you've had some troubles in the past with your "business friends?"
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  • Profile picture of the author Craigcmatthew
    I love the generous approach to work. I'd suggest you keep it up. Eventually you will reap the benefits.
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  • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
    Banned
    Business is business. You want a friend? Get a dog.

    Cheers. - Frank
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by BigFrank View Post

      Business is business. You want a friend? Get a dog.

      Cheers. - Frank
      Not sure if you've seen the movie.

      -You're never around. I was lonely!

      -Buy a dog.


      Priceless, LOL.

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    • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
      Originally Posted by BigFrank View Post

      Business is business. You want a friend? Get a dog.

      Cheers. - Frank
      or 2

      then you can marry the cuter one of them




      [i think i was talking to australians for a bit too long last night - their level of humor is a like a deadly virus to be honest mate - that's not a knoive - THATs a knoive]
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  • Profile picture of the author lakybel
    Well, a bargain is bargain. I'm not saying that you have to treat your client as an enemy or just a customers without feeling or don't showing respect to him.
    To keep touch with your clients as friend, you sometimes have to offer them promotional offers,
    To be successful you have to be good communicator
    Thank you for this great Thread.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by lakybel View Post

      Well, a bargain is bargain. I'm not saying that you have to treat your client as an enemy or just a customers without feeling or don't showing respect to him.
      To keep touch with your clients as friend, you sometimes have to offer them promotional offers,
      To be successful you have to be good communicator
      Thank you for this great Thread.
      Thank you for this great Comment =)
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  • Profile picture of the author brianapatt
    If you are in sales on any level, I am sure the line becomes blurry between client and friend all the time.

    When I am shopping at a fancy clothing store I want the salesmen to be friendly, complimenting, helpful, etc. Basically the same characteristics as what a friend will have.
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  • Profile picture of the author silveroaks
    Well the thing with being friends with your clients is that it is very complicated. Most of the times I have observed in my life through personal as well as distant experiences that money exploits your relations. If you make a friend a client then you are likely to lose friendship and if you make friend out of a client then be ready to lose money by always having to go an extra mile and always having to do extra favors. Some times you will want to do these things and at times you will just have to do them for the sake of friendship.
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  • Profile picture of the author superowid
    My friend can be my client, but my client shall not be my friend unless we both hang out in the same place do same fun - not business.
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