Would You Pay to Be Put In a Marketer's Autoresponder Series?

by giveusallfreedom 12 replies
Question...

A marketer has a squeeze page they promote. We'll say they get an average of 500 new subscribers a month. That's not a lot, but it's decent. They offer you the opportunity to promote your squeeze page to their list as part of their autoresponder. The conditions are:

- You have to promote a squeeze page with a quality freebie, but you can have a OTO behind it.

- Your message in the AR can sell your squeeze page, but it must also provide valuable information to the reader.

- Your message will stay in the AR forever. All new members will receive your message when it comes up in the queue.

The question is how much would you pay for this if it was a one time fee?

Here's a couple of things I'd like to point out.

First you'll notice the marketer's conditions exist to maintain the value in the list. If all the list ever gets is a barrage of advertisements, they'll quit opening the emails. The qualifications make sure that your emails get opened, but so that you can see returns on your investments.

Second this is a long term investment. You're not going to see a return quickly here, but over time you could see a massive return on your investment. A lot of marketers don't look at the long term. They want their results right now!!

Third, I added the clarification that this is a one time fee. That means that you can't test it. You'd have to put up the investment and hope it works. The marketer could allow you to update your post maybe for a fee, but that's about it.

Just some food for thought. I'm working on an idea that involves a new marketing dynamic based on somethings I've seen here on the WF.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #autoresponder #marketer #pay #put #series
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary Huynh
    I'd pay for a month and if results were good I'd continue to pay monthly. They may get 500 subscribers a month but what if half of them unsubscribe after the second email?

    It's a good thing to test. I prefer however to do an ad swap. I put their message in my autoresponder and they do the same in theirs.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kym Robinson
      How many are on the list to start with?
      Do these prices stack up in comparison with other ezine advertising?
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  • Profile picture of the author Kenneth L
    My simple answer is that I'd test it and if it turned a profit I'd keep it going and if it lost money then I wouldn't run it again.

    Testing and tracking is the only way to determine the effectiveness of any marketing campaign.
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  • Profile picture of the author deannatroupe
    It would depend on how many subscribers the marketer had and how responsive they were. You could have a subscriber list of 1000 people and no one from that list ever bought anything. It would also depend if the list was a list of buyers or tire kickers. Just my two cents.
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      Yes I'd definitely pay for it but from both sides you'd be better off paying on a periodic basis.

      The number of monthly subscribers could go up or down. The quality of those subscribers could go up or down.

      If they're your subscribers you'll make more money charging monthly or quarterly.

      Also the amount I'd be willing to pay on an ongoing basis would depend on how many people clicked through to my site, subscribed and ultimately purchased something.

      Ultimately I'll pay for and continue any honest, ethical advertising that makes a profit.

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      Andrew Cavanagh
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  • Profile picture of the author Bayo
    It would depend on who they are.
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  • Profile picture of the author giveusallfreedom
    And this is where you learn to be very specific.

    I actually meant it as a one time fee, not a monthly cost.

    Also the members currently on the list wouldn't matter, because you'd be put in the autoresponder series. You would only reach the new people as they came in, but you would reach every new person as they came in.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by giveusallfreedom View Post

      And this is where you learn to be very specific.

      I actually meant it as a one time fee, not a monthly cost.

      Also the members currently on the list wouldn't matter, because you'd be put in the autoresponder series. You would only reach the new people as they came in, but you would reach every new person as they came in.
      How far back in the sequence? What's the dropout rate, and the average time on list? How many similar offers are ahead of me?

      Combining attrition with email delivery issues, how could you guarantee I would reach every new person?

      Not to mention conversion rates for the squeeze page, the OTO or the lifetime value of a subscriber.

      AND I don't get to present my offer to existing members of the list?

      If this were the Dragon's Den, I'd be saying "This is not an investment for me. I'm out."
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      • Profile picture of the author giveusallfreedom
        Out of curiosity...

        What's the Dragon's Den?
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by giveusallfreedom View Post

          Out of curiosity...

          What's the Dragon's Den?
          It's a TV program I found on BBC America.

          The premise is that five wealthy investors agree to hear pitches from entrepreneurs looking for funding in exchange for equity. The entrepreneur makes the pitch, the "Dragons" ask questions and make comments, then each Dragon decides whether to offer the entrepreneur all, part or none of what they asked for. There can be negotiation on the amount of equity, etc.

          The catch is, the entrepreneur must receive the entire amount they seek, or they get nothing.


          It's rapidly becoming one of my favorites.
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          • Profile picture of the author giveusallfreedom
            LMAO

            John,

            Now that you say that I realize that I have actually asked this before and already knew that. Thanks for the post.
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