Have the skills.. no idea where to start!

23 replies
I've been hanging around online for about 10 years. I started researching IM my first two years but was completely overwhelmed with the amount of opportunities. I started to look into web development and somebody paid me $10 to tweak a page for them. That's when a lightbulb switched on.

Since then, I spent 5 years teaching myself programming and breaking my back on freelance websites, slowly increasing my rates as my skills and reputation grew. However, I wasn't happy with the fact I was essentially working a job without the promise of a frequent paycheck. So, I went and found great job and have been a full-time Ruby developer for the last 2 years (freelancing in Ruby for 2 years prior).

It's been a fantastic learning experience working with 40 other developers on a system that helps generate £400 million/yr in revenue.

However, my main priority right now is to build my own software -- yet I have no idea where to start. I can build almost any application or plugin. I was thinking of building a SaaS app or perhaps starting smaller with a premium WP plugin. The trouble is I am (again) completely lost with all these different niches.

Ideally, I want to be building software products for internet marketers, and have been considering JVing with someone if the opportunity arose.

I'd appreciate any advice. I'm extremely eager to jump in, but just want to do my due diligence before pouring my time into a project.
#idea #skills #start
  • Profile picture of the author kartherma
    Might be room in the DFS arena- pulling data player/game data, making automated projections, and automated optimal lineups. There are several out there, but they all pull in monthly SaaS type revenues...
    Plenty for football and baseball. Several for NBA and a few for hockey. Just a few for golf. I have yet to see one for college football or basketball.

    More- there are essentially two main sites and several smaller ones that offer the DFS games. Possibly a software interface that allows monitoring of game progress on both platforms in one spot.

    Just an idea.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    WP Plugin.

    In your shoes, I'd take the relatively simple route, just until I had a better feel for IM. You're in a very good position: you write well (better than the average marketer, judging by your forum post), and you can code, and you likely have plenty of other things that you can bring to the table, given those 10 years of absorbing IM information. This puts you way, way, way ahead of the pack (the pack of existing marketers who are struggling, and the massive pack of new entrants to IM). However, we still have to keep in mind that you're a newbie, and being a cracking coder doesn't mean you'll make a cracking marketer (in my experience just the opposite is true). If I had to guess, and based on those 10 years and your post above, I'd say you're a coder who can make it in this industry. One of the hardest skills to acquire is one you already have - an ability to communicate effectively.

    Now, you have plenty of options with the WP plugin route. I mentioned simple, though, so I'll describe a simple route. You use Codecanyon.net as your base to sell; I'm sure you're also familiar with the site. That is your base. You can list your products, processing is handled for you, and they even have an affiliate program, so (without even needing to setup your own aff' prog') you can encourage marketers to promote your plugin; and if it's any good, I'll be one of those marketers if you like. However - just knowing where you'll sell and process transactions is one small piece in a fairly large puzzle. Let's hop down a paragraph.

    First, you need to know a few things. You need to know your target audience (in general terms I'd strongly recommend internet marketers, as opposed to casual bloggers), and also specific audience pockets (since most businesses have quite a large collect of specific target audiences). When you know your audience? You know what your audience wants. And let me tell you something: when you figure out a WP plugin that gives the IM Crowd what they want, that either does what no other plugin does or does it better, and IF that plugin has a powerful means of increasing their income - you have yourself a lovely little goldmine. As you already know, people like myself (and most other marketers in this vicinity) spend a great deal of money each year to operate our businesses. If you can offer me something of true worth, that I absolutely must have - consider me a buyer, consider possibly 3.2 million people a month visiting WF buyers, and consider most other people who run a WP blog a buyer. Goldmine.

    The rest is actually dead simple.

    Setup:
    • Register with Code Canyon.
    • Determine your audience.
    • Research what they want/ need but don't have (or don't have a good version of).
    • Develop the plugin.
    • List the plugin.
    • Put together a high-end website (not just for the plugin, but for your entire business, since you'll want to release other software).
    • Integrate email capturing into the website, as well as socials.
    • Setup those socials, branding them: FB, G+, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc.
    • Use the blog to talk about your latest plugin. IDEALLY, you actually also want to talk about an area of the business where you USE the plugin. That will give you something to write about and of course promote the plugin and do content upgrades with your newsletter. Imagine, for example, you made a plugin for something to do with social marketing on FB. You could talk FB marketing each day. You'd have a reason to, you see, and it wouldn't seem like you're pimping your plugin each day - though you would be, lol.
    Promotion:
    • WF
    • Other IM forums (not sure I'm allowed to list 'em).
    • Socials.
    • Search.
    • FB Ads.
    • Guest Blogging.
    • Select media buys.
    • JVs.
    A chap in your position, being fairly new to IM, will want to mostly look into JVs (as you already mention). This is what you need: you need the type of JV where the marketer uses that plugin and gets X results, X concrete, there it is on paper, go take a look, here's a screen capture, heck, here's a video RESULTS. If that same marketer has an email list of 25K or more - blammo - you're in business. Plenty of ways to work this JV, as well. Profit sharing, favours, being the two biggies.

    Big subject, and I could talk all day. I've literally scratched the surface above, and not wanting to write a novel here, given a few of the Cliff Notes. I hope you find some of it useful, though. If you do develop anything for IM, please feel free let me know when it comes to the market; I'd be interested in using it and (if it's really very good) promoting it. Oh, before I shoot off. I've described the simple route, as I mentioned. The real money in IM software comes from providing a service with a monthly subscription structure. You get 10 subscribers, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and so forth. That's the real goldmine, but you'd be making work for yourself at this stage. I say get your feet wet. Get some money coming in. THEN go after the big money. Anyway - all the best. Let me know, remember!

    - Tom
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    • Profile picture of the author Damien Roche
      Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

      WP Plugin.

      In your shoes, I'd take the relatively simple route, just until I had a better feel for IM. You're in a very good position: you write well (better than the average marketer, judging by your forum post), and you can code, and you likely have plenty of other things that you can bring to the table, given those 10 years of absorbing IM information. This puts you way, way, way ahead of the pack (the pack of existing marketers who are struggling, and the massive pack of new entrants to IM). However, we still have to keep in mind that you're a newbie, and being a cracking coder doesn't mean you'll make a cracking marketer (in my experience just the opposite is true). If I had to guess, and based on those 10 years and your post above, I'd say you're a coder who can make it in this industry. One of the hardest skills to acquire is one you already have - an ability to communicate effectively.

      Now, you have plenty of options with the WP plugin route. I mentioned simple, though, so I'll describe a simple route. You use Codecanyon.net as your base to sell; I'm sure you're also familiar with the site. That is your base. You can list your products, processing is handled for you, and they even have an affiliate program, so (without even needing to setup your own aff' prog') you can encourage marketers to promote your plugin; and if it's any good, I'll be one of those marketers if you like. However - just knowing where you'll sell and process transactions is one small piece in a fairly large puzzle. Let's hop down a paragraph.

      First, you need to know a few things. You need to know your target audience (in general terms I'd strongly recommend internet marketers, as opposed to casual bloggers), and also specific audience pockets (since most businesses have quite a large collect of specific target audiences). When you know your audience? You know what your audience wants. And let me tell you something: when you figure out a WP plugin that gives the IM Crowd what they want, that either does what no other plugin does or does it better, and IF that plugin has a powerful means of increasing their income - you have yourself a lovely little goldmine. As you already know, people like myself (and most other marketers in this vicinity) spend a great deal of money each year to operate our businesses. If you can offer me something of true worth, that I absolutely must have - consider me a buyer, consider possibly 3.2 million people a month visiting WF buyers, and consider most other people who run a WP blog a buyer. Goldmine.

      The rest is actually dead simple.

      Setup:
      • Register with Code Canyon.
      • Determine your audience.
      • Research what they want/ need but don't have (or don't have a good version of).
      • Develop the plugin.
      • List the plugin.
      • Put together a high-end website (not just for the plugin, but for your entire business, since you'll want to release other software).
      • Integrate email capturing into the website, as well as socials.
      • Setup those socials, branding them: FB, G+, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc.
      • Use the blog to talk about your latest plugin. IDEALLY, you actually also want to talk about an area of the business where you USE the plugin. That will give you something to write about and of course promote the plugin and do content upgrades with your newsletter. Imagine, for example, you made a plugin for something to do with social marketing on FB. You could talk FB marketing each day. You'd have a reason to, you see, and it wouldn't seem like you're pimping your plugin each day - though you would be, lol.
      Promotion:
      • WF
      • Other IM forums (not sure I'm allowed to list 'em).
      • Socials.
      • Search.
      • FB Ads.
      • Guest Blogging.
      • Select media buys.
      • JVs.
      A chap in your position, being fairly new to IM, will want to mostly look into JVs (as you already mention). This is what you need: you need the type of JV where the marketer uses that plugin and gets X results, X concrete, there it is on paper, go take a look, here's a screen capture, heck, here's a video RESULTS. If that same marketer has an email list of 25K or more - blammo - you're in business. Plenty of ways to work this JV, as well. Profit sharing, favours, being the two biggies.

      Big subject, and I could talk all day. I've literally scratched the surface above, and not wanting to write a novel here, given a few of the Cliff Notes. I hope you find some of it useful, though. If you do develop anything for IM, please feel free let me know when it comes to the market; I'd be interested in using it and (if it's really very good) promoting it. Oh, before I shoot off. I've described the simple route, as I mentioned. The real money in IM software comes from providing a service with a monthly subscription structure. You get 10 subscribers, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and so forth. That's the real goldmine, but you'd be making work for yourself at this stage. I say get your feet wet. Get some money coming in. THEN go after the big money. Anyway - all the best. Let me know, remember!

      - Tom
      This is an outstanding post, thank you very much! I'll take your advice and start planning a small release to get my feet wet.
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

      WP Plugin.

      In your shoes, I'd take the relatively simple route, just until I had a better feel for IM. You're in a very good position: you write well (better than the average marketer, judging by your forum post), and you can code, and you likely have plenty of other things that you can bring to the table, given those 10 years of absorbing IM information. This puts you way, way, way ahead of the pack (the pack of existing marketers who are struggling, and the massive pack of new entrants to IM). However, we still have to keep in mind that you're a newbie, and being a cracking coder doesn't mean you'll make a cracking marketer (in my experience just the opposite is true). If I had to guess, and based on those 10 years and your post above, I'd say you're a coder who can make it in this industry. One of the hardest skills to acquire is one you already have - an ability to communicate effectively.

      Now, you have plenty of options with the WP plugin route. I mentioned simple, though, so I'll describe a simple route. You use Codecanyon.net as your base to sell; I'm sure you're also familiar with the site. That is your base. You can list your products, processing is handled for you, and they even have an affiliate program, so (without even needing to setup your own aff' prog') you can encourage marketers to promote your plugin; and if it's any good, I'll be one of those marketers if you like. However - just knowing where you'll sell and process transactions is one small piece in a fairly large puzzle. Let's hop down a paragraph.

      First, you need to know a few things. You need to know your target audience (in general terms I'd strongly recommend internet marketers, as opposed to casual bloggers), and also specific audience pockets (since most businesses have quite a large collect of specific target audiences). When you know your audience? You know what your audience wants. And let me tell you something: when you figure out a WP plugin that gives the IM Crowd what they want, that either does what no other plugin does or does it better, and IF that plugin has a powerful means of increasing their income - you have yourself a lovely little goldmine. As you already know, people like myself (and most other marketers in this vicinity) spend a great deal of money each year to operate our businesses. If you can offer me something of true worth, that I absolutely must have - consider me a buyer, consider possibly 3.2 million people a month visiting WF buyers, and consider most other people who run a WP blog a buyer. Goldmine.

      The rest is actually dead simple.

      Setup:
      • Register with Code Canyon.
      • Determine your audience.
      • Research what they want/ need but don't have (or don't have a good version of).
      • Develop the plugin.
      • List the plugin.
      • Put together a high-end website (not just for the plugin, but for your entire business, since you'll want to release other software).
      • Integrate email capturing into the website, as well as socials.
      • Setup those socials, branding them: FB, G+, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc.
      • Use the blog to talk about your latest plugin. IDEALLY, you actually also want to talk about an area of the business where you USE the plugin. That will give you something to write about and of course promote the plugin and do content upgrades with your newsletter. Imagine, for example, you made a plugin for something to do with social marketing on FB. You could talk FB marketing each day. You'd have a reason to, you see, and it wouldn't seem like you're pimping your plugin each day - though you would be, lol.
      Promotion:
      • WF
      • Other IM forums (not sure I'm allowed to list 'em).
      • Socials.
      • Search.
      • FB Ads.
      • Guest Blogging.
      • Select media buys.
      • JVs.
      A chap in your position, being fairly new to IM, will want to mostly look into JVs (as you already mention). This is what you need: you need the type of JV where the marketer uses that plugin and gets X results, X concrete, there it is on paper, go take a look, here's a screen capture, heck, here's a video RESULTS. If that same marketer has an email list of 25K or more - blammo - you're in business. Plenty of ways to work this JV, as well. Profit sharing, favours, being the two biggies.

      Big subject, and I could talk all day. I've literally scratched the surface above, and not wanting to write a novel here, given a few of the Cliff Notes. I hope you find some of it useful, though. If you do develop anything for IM, please feel free let me know when it comes to the market; I'd be interested in using it and (if it's really very good) promoting it. Oh, before I shoot off. I've described the simple route, as I mentioned. The real money in IM software comes from providing a service with a monthly subscription structure. You get 10 subscribers, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and so forth. That's the real goldmine, but you'd be making work for yourself at this stage. I say get your feet wet. Get some money coming in. THEN go after the big money. Anyway - all the best. Let me know, remember!

      - Tom
      Just when I was getting a good kick from the typical nitwit stuff that is posted here, along comes this guy with his highly superb and ever insightful take on things.

      Thanks for spoiling a humorous morning, Mr. Addams
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10841071].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
        Originally Posted by discrat View Post

        Just when I was getting a good kick from the typical nitwit stuff that is posted here, along comes this guy with his highly superb and ever insightful take on things.

        Thanks for spoiling a humorous morning, Mr. Addams
        Sir Discrat, if I wasn't married (and you looked a lot more like Elvira), I'd propose on bended knee, you charming devil.

        - Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author David G 247
    HI Damien
    I Have 2 software's that I have developed with programmers and they make's me passive money(I do all the pr)
    I have a killer software in my mind but I need a super programmer for that.
    I believe that if you learned the IM as I did you will see the potential in that software.
    I will be happy to give you more details in private.
    Signature
    You provide the product

    We do the marketing

    https://www.winwinpact.com/

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  • Profile picture of the author VincentD
    I think what makes a Super Programmer become a Successful Business Person is understanding the people's pain point. You already have the right tools under your belt. Now, you need to find what it is that is bothering people and solve their problem using your tools.

    I have found the pain point in SEO marketing and applied my skills to solve that problem. My SaaS product has gained traction very early on because everyone can see the values that my product bring.

    Keep it up and good luck!

    - Vincent
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    Instead of selling your own stuff, maybe you should explore joint ventures

    Partner up with someone with the sales/promotions skills so your products get properly promoted
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  • Profile picture of the author aizaku
    wow, sounds like you should listen to this podcast

    it's right up your alley:

    SPI 046: Building a Lucrative Business with No Ideas, No Expertise, and No Money with Dane Maxwell - The Smart Passive Income Blog


    YOU especially would learn a lot from it..

    best of luck bro
    Ike Paz
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    • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
      Interesting question,

      Not sure if these days code canyon is the market leader or not,

      years ago I did a JV with a developer and promoted his exe software [shareware] to sites like Cnet, download.com and about 1000 others.

      So what happened was, people download the shareware and get more functionality when they upgrade....

      worked very well, got daily orders for it.

      Would I want to develop a new software? Maybe, actually you can do this
      yourself, get ideas by: Go to download.com and check the top weekly download
      charts - then think about which software to model and IMPROVE on it.

      That easy! I did not develop my own, I simply chose one category, and
      contacted the market leader with the most downloads. He made a white label
      version for me, then later I put my own logo on it, own branding, and got heaps
      of downloads and upgrades.
      Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Latty Dacres
    Starting a job on the internet isn't easy, getting a physical job is even harder. Finding legitimate job on the internet is somewhat challenging, because of all the scam and no good advertising that misleads you. But here is the deal start from a small amount forget the so-called gurus who is promising you that you will make 10k in the next 24 hours it isn't that easy. Take it slow you will soon it the big bucks.for best home business ideas and opportunities visit..
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris-
    One approach . . . post on the JV Forum here, get real data on anyone who might be interested in working with you . . . have they made real money selling software or something similar, more than once?

    There's a thread I came across a few years ago here, from some guy who made, I think it was $25,000 from selling software, maybe a WordPress Plugin. So do some Googling, and find any threads here (or elsewhere) on making money from software, read everything, make notes.

    Hope that gives you some ideas

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author bleght
    It doesn't really matter where you'll start, what really matters is your follow-through, consistency and dedication. There is room for many products in the market and many people have been successful and will be successful with everything you mentioned, so you just need to pick something that will be interesting to you to work on for the longest amount of time and start getting dirty.

    Your plans will change many time in the course of doing it properly, and your first product will be something that you'll mess up in one way or another, you'll learn your lessons and you'll move on to the next one and you'll probably get your big break with some other product you develop later when you have more experience marketing what you build.

    So don't waste too much time deciding. Yes, thinking about the same question for too long becomes a waste of time pretty quickly. You have all the info, make a decision and follow through. Then evaluate, reiterate and repeat.
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  • On the other hand, I've been wanting to develop so many kinds of different softwares because I often see needs and opportunities, but I frustratingly do not have a single spark of programming talent! Oh there are so many opportunities for you if you're really good at it!
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris-
      Originally Posted by digitalcontentmarketer View Post

      On the other hand, I've been wanting to develop so many kinds of different softwares because I often see needs and opportunities, but I frustratingly do not have a single spark of programming talent! Oh there are so many opportunities for you if you're really good at it!
      You could find others to work with . . . a programmer, and most importantly, marketing and sales experience. Making the product is the easy bit, selling it is what matters most.

      Alternatively, invest some money in getting programming done (if you haven't got the cash yourself, consider getting an investor).

      Chris
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      • Thanks for your insights, Chris! I've actually been considering taking this route -- partnering/working with other people to make the process easier and faster. My success wealth coach told me to leverage on other people's resources/abilities while contributing my own expertise and resources as well. Digital sales and marketing is also my forte (plus I'm a copywriter), so that's not a problem for me. I'm just really very cautious (and most times adamant) to trust other people, so I have to work on that in case I dive deep into partnering with others.

        I've also seen the 'White Label Academy" training recently released on JVZoo that "promises" to reveal the secrets to selling softwares even when you don't know anything about coding (I think the main point is to outsource or become an affiliate). I'm still thinking on whether I'll get the product or not as there are just so many products these days which do not really give real value.

        But thanks again! I'm getting more open to the idea of partnering with others.
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        • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
          Originally Posted by digitalcontentmarketer View Post

          Thanks for your insights, Chris! I've actually been considering taking this route -- partnering/working with other people to make the process easier and faster. My success wealth coach told me to leverage on other people's resources/abilities while contributing my own expertise and resources as well. Digital sales and marketing is also my forte (plus I'm a copywriter), so that's not a problem for me. I'm just really very cautious (and most times adamant) to trust other people, so I have to work on that in case I dive deep into partnering with others.

          I've also seen the 'White Label Academy" training recently released on JVZoo that "promises" to reveal the secrets to selling softwares even when you don't know anything about coding (I think the main point is to outsource or become an affiliate). I'm still thinking on whether I'll get the product or not as there are just so many products these days which do not really give real value.

          But thanks again! I'm getting more open to the idea of partnering with others.
          It depends on the type of software you want to make, DCM, but often JVs are not the answer for non-programmers with a marketing background; it works better the other way around: programmers seeking JVs, because they often absolutely lack the resources and knowledge to get the venture off the ground. But! If you have those resources, and, like I say, dependant upon the type of software, there are better routes. Take a look at uBot and Zennoposter. Neither, IMO, is a substitute for an expert coder, but you can certainly make some incredibly powerful applications with them. You'll find many marketers using the software for BH purposes, but they're equally powerful for WH, as well. Often, the trick is to know your way around a certain method that can, with the introduction of automation, be improved dramatically in a white hat manner. Anyway, something to look into perhaps.

          - Tom
          Signature

          I Coach: Learn More | My Latest WF Thread: Dead Domains/ Passive Traffic
          Learn one way I earn money: I give away free stuff.

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          • Wow, Tom! Thanks for the info! I'll check out uBot and Zennoposter! I'm excited to figure out how I could use them for WH! Thanks again!
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          • Profile picture of the author SethTheUBotGuy
            Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

            It depends on the type of software you want to make, DCM, but often JVs are not the answer for non-programmers with a marketing background; it works better the other way around: programmers seeking JVs, because they often absolutely lack the resources and knowledge to get the venture off the ground. But! If you have those resources, and, like I say, dependant upon the type of software, there are better routes. Take a look at uBot and Zennoposter. Neither, IMO, is a substitute for an expert coder, but you can certainly make some incredibly powerful applications with them. You'll find many marketers using the software for BH purposes, but they're equally powerful for WH, as well. Often, the trick is to know your way around a certain method that can, with the introduction of automation, be improved dramatically in a white hat manner. Anyway, something to look into perhaps.

            - Tom
            I second UBot
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        • Profile picture of the author Chris-
          Originally Posted by digitalcontentmarketer View Post

          Thanks for your insights, Chris! I've actually been considering taking this route -- partnering/working with other people to make the process easier and faster. My success wealth coach told me to leverage on other people's resources/abilities while contributing my own expertise and resources as well. Digital sales and marketing is also my forte (plus I'm a copywriter), so that's not a problem for me. I'm just really very cautious (and most times adamant) to trust other people, so I have to work on that in case I dive deep into partnering with others.

          I've also seen the 'White Label Academy" training recently released on JVZoo that "promises" to reveal the secrets to selling softwares even when you don't know anything about coding (I think the main point is to outsource or become an affiliate). I'm still thinking on whether I'll get the product or not as there are just so many products these days which do not really give real value.

          But thanks again! I'm getting more open to the idea of partnering with others.
          You're right to be cautious . . . lots of ways partnerships can go wrong, but if you take care and get it all right, the results can be worth it !

          Try to think of everything that might go wrong, before you start the partnership, and make it clear what will happen if each thing goes wrong, or what will happen if things go right (who owns what, who gets what percentage of the money etc.).

          When outsourcing software, one thing I learned is that, even if you post a Fixed-price job, so in theory you only have to pay if the result works to your satisfaction, and even if you state clearly in the job description that the results must work on your computer, not just on the creator's machine, it's still possible for the software creator to open a dispute and force you to pay for something that just does not work at all on your computer. This happened to me, and the outsourcing website (UpWork) forced to pay, even though I could prove I got zero value, and even though a dispute was clearly against their own policies at the time, and even though the job I posted clearly stated that the software MUST work on MY computer.

          The way to minimize the effects of this, is to break the job into small milestones, so you only ever have a small amount of your money in escrow that can be taken from you.

          Chris
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          • Great tips, Chris! Yep, it's always best to take necessary steps to minimize risks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Catherine Bueno
    Hi there,

    Just basing on your years of experience as well as your expertise, you are blessed and awesome my friend. Making an IM software would really be great, but, I think you should list down a number of fields you have interest in making a software on. In this way, you will know where to start and how to act on it.

    Best of luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author EPoltrack77
    You said it! No skills! Learn th skills on online marketing. All skills are learnable when you surround yourself with the correct people.

    Making money online will not fall out of the sky unless we understand what we are doing. Only once you understand can somebody take the correct actions.
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    How To Make Affiliate Commissions Without Having To Worry About Generating Traffic!
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