by Hippos
37 replies
I've been doing business online for about 15 years. Started when I was still in highschool. Made some nice pocket money at the time, but never made it big. It was just a hobby, and I didn't know much about business in general.

7 years later I graduated from college and started working. I like my work, and get a decent salary. I became pretty good at what I do.

At the same time I kept up my online ventures. I explored many paths, some minor successes, but mostly failures. Nothing big.

And here is where I struggle: I love working on my own projects! All day at work I'm thinking about how I could have used that time working on my own projects instead. It doesn't feel right to keep working 9-to-5. It gets frustrating to keep it up. Even though like I said: nice people, pretty interesting work, decent salary.

I could just quit and follow my dreams. But every time I think about it, I have those 15 years of failure smiling at me...

Am I just spoiled? Should I get back to reality and keep doing the 9-to-5 until I have worked out something that works? Perhaps. But this slows down my progress so much. There's only so many hours in a day.


At one side you have all those people online talking about how they followed their dreams and shaped their own dream life. But at the same time there's this feeling that those are just the lucky few and perhaps I'm just not good enough.


Don't know what I expect from posting this here, really... mostly getting it off my chest. Perhaps someone can relate.



[edit]
Wow, didn't expect so many responses. Thanks everyone! I was planning to reply to everyone individually, but that would kind of clutter the thread at this point.

I feel I should also give a little more info about my situation.

I'm working fulltime.
Have my own webdevelopment agency on the side (earning pretty good money, but few projects - not really my dream though, not very motivated to get new clients)
Doing my own website projects (-> this is what I actually want to do in life)
And at the same time I'm also building my own house, which takes up a lot of my free time.

So just to be clear: I'm not lazy. It's not that I'm not motivated enough to work on it. But at this point I have about 1 hour of "family time" left every day, and that includes weekends! There is just not enough time to do it all.

At the same time, because I work a lot, I managed to have enough savings to last about 3 years. So I wouldn't have to go straight into panic mode.

Though I'm not really looking forward to wasting all my savings either.

Lastly, failure is indeed not the best word to describe my situation. I have build some good stuff, not even close to replacing my job, but definately something I can build on.

What makes me believe I can do it now, after 15 years of failure? Well, for 15 years I've been building stuff. "If you build it, they will come". Well, some did come. But now I never did any marketing. Very silly that it took me 15 years to realise. But it's also a consequence of not having a lot of time. I used to work for months on a project, and when it was finally ready, I was exhausted! But actually, that should have been only step 1.

I'm working on something big now, planning to do everything right this time. Perhaps that is the best advice, finish that project and see if it's successful.

I'm exhausted, but hopefully it will be worth it in the end. There's no way I could ever give up the dream.
#failure #years
  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Use those 15 years as a learning process. It really doesn't seem you gave it a full fledged attempt.
    Maybe I could be wrong ??

    But definitely do not quit your day time job.
    This is a flexible business to run from home. And you can work a few hours at night. And just start building from there


    - Robert Andrew
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  • Profile picture of the author salegurus
    Number one rule: Never, ever quit your job to chase a dream unless you have the funds available to support yourself...
    Making any substantial income online is not easy and even if you succeed it may take a while...



    Originally Posted by Hippos View Post

    i could just quit and follow my dreams. But every time I think about it, I have those 15 years of failure smiling at me...
    I don't want to be a dream killer but 15 years of failure is a long time. Doing the same thing over and over with nothing to show for it seems asinine.
    Maybe it's time you try something else...



    Originally Posted by Hippos View Post

    one side you have all those people online talking about how they followed their dreams and shaped their own dream life. But at the same time there's this feeling that those are just the lucky few and perhaps I'm just not good enough.
    Keep in mind, yes there are some people making a decent living online but many more faking or lying about their so called success!
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    The safe move would be to keep your job and work part time on the IM.

    Once you have a steady online income, then you could reevaluate the value of your job and if it makes sense to quit,
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    • Profile picture of the author EMPIRE2
      Thats exactly my goal keep an income flowing. Maybe you could work part time cut your hours gradually?
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Hippos,

    There are a lot of people that can relate to your feelings and experience.

    I agree with the sentiment that you should not quit your job to chase this dream. I usually suggest to people who are working full time with the goal of quitting so they can spend full time online . . . don't cut your ties to your income until your online business meets or surpasses your full time job - especially if you are married and have someone to support other than yourself. Yes, some "lucky" people have done it that way, but you are really taking a risk and putting needless pressure on yourself.

    Work to create your online business in your spare time, at night, on weekends, etc. Building a business can be done that way. We all hear the success stories online but seldom hear about all the failures and I can say without hesitating that the failures way outnumber the successes!

    Build on what you know and what you have learned about online business over the past 15 years. Very important: Do you market research up front so you know where there is buying demand before you decide upon a niche to enter. Being in the right marketplace is extremely important. When you have a hungry audience and you listen to them, they will let you know what they are looking for.

    Selling effectively is difficult for most people, especially newcomers, so make sure that you are building a business in a marketplace where people have and spend money.

    The very best to you,

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author EPoltrack77
    Why do people always look at the worst? I you look at that way it will be really hard to find success. Try looking at what you have right and have the mindset that your one step closer to success.

    The choice is yours!
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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    But every time I think about it, I have those 15 years of failure smiling at me...
    Chris Farrel claims 14 years before success. I believe he was a truck driver.

    Many other successful marketers have similar stories.

    At one side you have all those people online talking about how they followed their dreams and shaped their own dream life. But at the same time there's this feeling that those are just the lucky few and perhaps I'm just not good enough.
    There are only a few, but luck has nothing to do with it.

    I definitely wouldn't quit your job, but I wouldn't give up your dream of freedom either. You just haven't found the right path yet.
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  • Profile picture of the author PPG19
    I would have to agree with the others. Before committing yourself in such a huge way and quit your job you need the money to support at least 12 months or more of expenses. It's unrealistic to get into an online business and start earning good amounts of money right away like a lot of people on this forum claim to be doing.

    Do it in your part time and when you reach a steady monthly income you are comfortable living with that will cover all your basic expenses, quit your job and focus on scaling the business.

    Entrepreneurs/Online Marketers sometimes think that if they don't start right away they will loose opportunities but is not true.

    An online business takes time to build, keep your job and do it in the spare time and when the business gets bigger and is ready to grow, go for it, leave the job and focus 100% on it. Lots of great and profitable business have been started in that way.
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  • Profile picture of the author topcoder
    What you can do is maybe look for another job in your same field, that will allow you more free time to work on your IM business. Better paying job with less hours, better vacation package, etc.

    Or find a job that's similar to your IM goals, so that you can learn what works or doesn't work and get paid for it and use that knowledge to grow your own side business until it's ready.
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  • Profile picture of the author zdebx
    As others suggested, it would be silly to leave your job without having anything consistent established in your online ventures.

    The big advantage of working online is the fact that you can do it after work, sat at home in front of your PC, drinking tea/coffee and work until you fall asleep. You don't have to go out anywhere, you don't have to carry anything heavy or work in the rain, etc.

    Of course it's still work, but you can do it as a secondary job on part-time basis quite casually without it affecting your daily routine, while the potential income can be huge, if done right.

    I would suggest making a diary and writing down everything you've done over the last 15 years online and then analyze it all. This will help you to see what/when you did wrong, how you can improve on your mistakes and move on.

    They say winners never quit and quitters never win.

    Also I would suggest reading Seth Godin's "The Dip", as it explains when to quit and when to stick with what you're doing.
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  • Profile picture of the author mds9f7
    You definitely should read The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss. (Or listen to the audiobook.) It is geared exactly toward people in your situation.

    I'd estimate at least half the book is focused on consciously maximizing your output at your day job, in order to gradually spend more and more time on your pet project... until the project becomes your "day job". Lots of good techniques. And he talks about how, if you have a little money to spend on it, there are also ways to cheaply hire others to do minor tasks you delegate to them, so you don't waste time on the parts you're not so good at or are highly time-consuming.

    Check it out at a library. But don't just quit to follow your dreams until you have realized a few of them. Down that road lies madness and destitution; I speak from experience!
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    • Profile picture of the author art72
      Nobody knows what your driving force is... and most would run from pursuing their own dream in lieu of the comfort and security of a job.

      I too can relate as I've been fiddling around in a multitude of online ventures for the past 5-6 years. *Never to fully accept my knowledge (online) was worthy of my ambitions.

      Recently, I did what I always do... a contractor called me, and asked if I was busy and "IF" I was available to complete a full bathroom renovation.

      I wanted to decline the offer, but needed the money and thought; "maybe this time doors will open if I go in with a positive attitude, do my job well, and exploit my talents."

      After 10 days... a ton of empty promises... the client tempting me to do other work behind the contractor's back (which I declined)... and the homeowner's continuum of promises towards promoting the quality of my workmanahip to their inner-circle...

      The contractor bitched it took too long. The homeowner praised the results, but cried about material cost (at cost) and for all my efforts to remain loyal and provide more than that which I was paid for (as I always do)... Neither the contractor, nor the client remained true to their promises. (As usual, lol)


      I remained true to mine... but, once people get what they need or want from you... You're toast!

      Some people 'accept' payment as enough. In my mind a sincere Thank-you, acknowledgement, appreciation, and gratitude 'by far' exceeds the paycheck.

      In fact, I'd prefer none of the aforementioned and meet a handful of people who stand on their word, honor their agreements, and do what it was they proclaimed capable of doing... which is much to ask in this day and age!

      In today's world, everyone is quick to'sell out' on their dreams and although their dreams could easily become areality... They settle for comfort, security, and familiarity. (More often than not from my observations).

      In my example above... I am comfortable renovating homes, performing a multitude of home improvement services, and yet my dream is to become a successful writer online... (Preferrably through digital media and online marketing & advertising strategies.)

      Yet... here I am -- Right now, developing new business cards, a complete website, and crafting a localized marketing strategy for another offline construction venture... Art's Creative Edge- "Specializing in Home Improvements" (hidden acronym... A.C.E.S.H.I.)to provide labor services to a localized homeowners market.

      Why?

      Simply because my online venture will require roughly $5,000.00 to test, and if all goes well, will optimistically in bring a minimum of 50:1 returns (or greater)... which in reality, I have yet to fully accept I deserve.

      Meanwhile, the online dream will set me free from 'laboring for dollars' -or- more popularly known as; "trading time for money."

      I often feel guilty for having invested so much time, energy, and money into internet marketing, and yet... What better way to test all my online skills, than to target clients online with my offline offerings/services?

      At least until, I can acquire the proper funding for my ad-venture, and transition from laboring... into writing, design, and traffic generation services.

      So... as others suggested, don't quit your job just yet or write off your existing income, but find a way to either build it into your online dream or in the least; create something that will benefit those whom "like you" are seeking greater interests or an escape route...and provide the solution.

      When I build this offline company, I am utilizing my online skills to target highly responsive industries (i.e. construction and service dependent business owners, like myself) in an attempt to build an online lead generation business entitled; Ideal Leads Network.

      The hard part is staying disciplined long enough to finish the race... even though the bread winner's have long since crossed the finish line... or so it often feels when your running your next race.

      In time, your success will be measured equal to the effort you put in... Even if your track record only shows a few wins.

      Clearly, you learn(ed) from every defeat. So use that knowledge to help others succeed and to avoid the agony of defeat!

      In my up and coming ad-venture... I intend to supply guys like me with fresh new leads, new contracts, and deliver to those clients more jobs (more revenue) for a small fraction of the sales I help generate for business.

      Plus, I plan to pre-qualify my clients to ensure they have the skills, knowledfe, license, insurances, and ability to deliver professional results to the 'prospective buyers' I target online.

      It pisses me off at times that I may have to field the calls, write up proposals, and fulfill a few more months of contractural labor gigs... But now, I do so with an 'exit strategy'... Whereas before, I like many others... continued my trade skill gigs simply because I needed the money to meet the demands of my established lifestyle.

      A lifestyle that clearly would never possibly afford me the time, freedom, or money all the years of online study has afforded me to seek after.

      Now, I simple must choose to put all those years of study, failure, time, energy, and monies invested into direct responsive actions!

      Even if I have to spend 6 months, a year, or even 5 years continuing to renovate other people's homes...

      For now I believe; eventually, all that online knowledge will enable me to build a recurring monthly revenue in the 10's of 1,000's of dollars...simply by providing others with a steady influx of prospective buyers and will create a steady influx of new labor gigs for their business.

      It's a win/win/win. I escape the labor world. The client increases revenue for minimal investment of my services... and tge homeowner gets qualified and established professional services.

      Of course my success rests on my ability to write ad copy, sales copy, market, automate, and control my online assets (i.e. build websites that convert traffic into qualified, hyper-responsive leads.)

      Lastly, I aim to guarantee 'in writing' that any client I choose take on (and generate leads for) will receive a minimum of 25:1 returns in new cold sales... Or they don't pay for that months service.

      It's like selling $25 for $1 with a written guarantee... Who wouldn't appreciate that service?

      While I don't know what you've studied or what online ad-venture you have in mind... Let it be the focus remains on benefitting your audience first and foremost.. and deliver solutions... For with that recipe, one greatly lessens the odds of failure, almost guaranteeing their future success.

      Be it you relentlessly pursue your dream, rather than die in contempt to who and what you truly aspire to be/become.

      All the best,

      Art
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  • Profile picture of the author Sharpay
    I relate completely. Been doing this on and off for 10-ish years, since before I was 18 and was still in high school.

    Working at a bank was fine -- great benefits, great salary, the people were nice. But it was soul sucking. Having to deal with corporate politics kills me. You have to dress a certain way and maintain your physical appearance or else you're looked down upon, you have to smile and be happy regardless of your personal problems no matter their impact on your life, and if you're crying at your desk because your dog just died and someone of the opposite sex pats your shoulder in comfort then offers to take you to lunch, you get written up for sexual harassment so your company can protect themselves. (Legit, I got written up for sexual harassment because a male co-worker patted my shoulder in comfort.)

    Are you spoiled for wanting out of a fairly decent situation to do even better? No. You're privileged to have that opportunity.

    I couldn't handle the job anymore. It got worse and worse every day after I was written up. I quit, because I had the privilege of being able to move in with my father rent-free and with plenty of time to work on what I wanted. It's been a very frustrating journey.

    I thought it would be awesome, because I have plenty of time to work on what I like. But like you said, there are a lot of failures. I don't have a paycheck coming in to take care of food while I bumble around failing. I need that money coming in. And when you're desperate, and you keep failing, it gets stressful. VERY stressful.

    If I could do it over again, I'd wait until I had seen success - just minor success - before I quit. That way I could expand on and refine a process I know works, just needs to be fine tuned better.

    In my case I'm following a process I know works, just not how I'm doing it (so far).

    Good luck to you. I hope you see some bigger success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    And here is where I struggle: I love working on my own projects! All day at work I'm thinking about how I could have used that time working on my own projects instead. It doesn't feel right to keep working 9-to-5. It gets frustrating to keep it up. Even though like I said: nice people, pretty interesting work, decent salary.
    Honestly - I think you should discount the years when you were in high school and in college. That was, by your account, 7 years during a time when you were in the process of becoming an adult so not surprising if you weren't a wild success online.

    The next 8 years is a different story....how many profitable projects have you done in your spare time in the past 8 years?

    If you want to do your own "projects" - do them in your evening and weekend hours - build your business to the point where it can replace your day job if that's what you want.

    At one side you have all those people online talking about how they followed their dreams and shaped their own dream life. But at the same time there's this feeling that those are just the lucky few and perhaps I'm just not good enough.
    I've found most who are talking about the "dream life" are trying to sell you a dream...
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  • Profile picture of the author krees
    I hired a personal coach from right here on Warrior Forum. I know your struggle. My personal opinion is to get your "online" business running to where you know you can make money and the type of money that makes you comfortable. Then decide if you want to saty at your job or scale your online business.
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  • Profile picture of the author jinmin
    I can understand how you feel but whatever you do, remember to always believe in yourself. I highly suggested you get a good mentor to lead you to the right path. Not only can it cut short the journey, you will save a lot of times as well. Good luck mate.
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  • Profile picture of the author aizaku
    this thread's title is misleading,


    you didn't have 15 years of failure. You've had spurts of success here and there.

    why not build on that?

    but first thing is first, you need to specifically define your goal..

    Example: lets say $3,000 a month, you'd need to two $50 products a day..

    stick to one evergreen niche you know well (or learn it) and start building up your email list.

    best of luck,

    -Ike Paz
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  • I'd say alot of us would have gone through periods of ups and downs, buts it all part of the learning and testing process and applying what've you've learnt and build from it.
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  • Profile picture of the author CityCowboy
    I think you're very lucky because you've a decent paying job, and a job that you find interesting and not boring like the rest of the population.

    I think you could make it big, if you only invested some of your day job's money into your online ventures to set everything up and get traffic.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnVianny
    Work few hours to BUILD A LIST.

    work few hours to CREATE YOUR FUNNELL.

    DO NOT lose your daily job, otherwise you wouldnt have anything to nurture your dreams.

    Rinse and repeat.
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  • Profile picture of the author Courage
    When I started IM it took me about 6 months
    to start earning good money.

    It's been 10 years since then and my
    honest opinion is that if you're not
    successful at a certain point you
    should give up.

    This stuff is a business and it requires
    a certain temperament which some
    people just don't have.
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  • Profile picture of the author designermadi
    I can relate to it. But i don't have a 15 year experience. I have just started freelancing none of my designs are selected. I got banned from 2 other sites. I don't understand how to get started.
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  • Profile picture of the author matteomatt
    I can relate it is a tough venture, ive spent years before in internet marketing and ended up with nothing to show.

    During alot of times I had all day to work, so it can be tougher when you have a real job.

    You actually have an advantage too, you still have money coming in from that to support you. I can assure you your dreams are never over. I quit for a few years because I had no computer for a while, but have been able to come back and have some mild success already.

    The main thing is to be focused, and be smart with your time. Since you have other time constraints like a job, you need to pick a couple productive things and focus on it. For example, writing content, and creating a decent niche website in an area you are familiar with. It is a basic strategy, but better than doing nothing at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author Janice Sperry
    [QUOTE=Hippos;10876968]
    7 years later I graduated from college and started working. I like my work, and get a decent salary. I became pretty good at what I do....

    Even though like I said: nice people, pretty interesting work, decent salary.

    /QUOTE]

    I would call that 15 years of success!

    Maybe you are ready for a career change. Nothing wrong with that but don't discount how well you have done in your youth and in your first career.

    Occasionally dabbling on the Internet trying to make some money should not count as a success or a failure. You might call it experimenting or testing the waters but it doesn't sound like failing. At this point it is fish or cut bait. Quit dreaming and dabbling and COMMIT!

    "I want to seriously try to become self-employed. I will devote x hours per night and xx hours per weekend to an online business. I will devote $xxx to an online business. I will reevaluate in x months."

    You have some life skills and experience now that should help. Making money online long-term is not just about learning some IM jargon and clicking buttons.
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      [quote=Janice Sperry;10878237]
      Originally Posted by Hippos View Post

      7 years later I graduated from college and started working. I like my work, and get a decent salary. I became pretty good at what I do....

      Even though like I said: nice people, pretty interesting work, decent salary.

      /QUOTE]

      I would call that 15 years of success!

      Maybe you are ready for a career change. Nothing wrong with that but don't discount how well you have done in your youth and in your first career.

      Occasionally dabbling on the Internet trying to make some money should not count as a success or a failure. You might call it experimenting or testing the waters but it doesn't sound like failing. At this point it is fish or cut bait. Quit dreaming and dabbling and COMMIT!

      "I want to seriously try to become self-employed. I will devote x hours per night and xx hours per weekend to an online business. I will devote to an online business. I will reevaluate in x months."

      You have some life skills and experience now that should help. Making money online long-term is not just about learning some IM jargon and clicking buttons.
      Yeah Janice I agree. Some say it was 15 years of failing but to me just to be in the Game in High school ( and having small minor successes) is somewhat of a Success in of itself. I could barely tie my shoes then LOL

      Of course kids these days are computer saavy so maybe it's not that big of a deal.

      Nonetheless, take that 15 years and slowly give it a real attempt splitting the devotion of time during late hours at night while still keeping your day job


      - Robert Andrew
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  • Profile picture of the author bushell86
    I was in a similar situation to you. I've been doing this since I was in high school, I've had a few successes over the years, a few thousand here and there but nothing consistent enough to do it full-time... until I had to leave my job and I kind of had no other option but to make money online a stable income. Luckily enough, it paid off and I've had some extremely profitable months.

    I honestly don't believe I'd have succeeded if I were in my 9-5 office job as it does take time to learn, try and test methods. Coming home from a 9-5 I just CBA sitting on my laptop working. I'm making 5x more than I was per month than my office job, and I truly believe I can increase that - thats one of the benefits, is that the possibilities are endless in terms of how much you can earn (in a 9-5 you're kind of restricted).

    Even though I'm doing pretty well (at the moment), I always have the uncertainty in the back of my mind incase I have a bad month or things don't go to plan for several months.

    It's not for everyone - but I say most won't make a stable income until you leave the day job and put 100% effort in, have 6 months money saved up for bills to give some breathing space - if it all goes pear shaped, you can always go back to the day job. I wouldn't change my situation now, and I'd find it hard going back to an office job.

    Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author beat ship
    My advice is keep your 9 to 5 job. Appreciate your job as a source of steady income and opportunity for networking and even socialization.

    Don't assume it would be easy to get a new job or underestimate the savings you need/expenses you will incur once you lose your job and devote full time on your online business.

    Start an online business (affiliate marketing, or drop-shipping) on the side even if you can just work on it for two hours a day during the weekday. Try spending more hours on it during your free time (Saturday), but I advice against working on Sunday. Make it a rest day and time for your family.

    ****My point is if you can't even consistently spend a couple of hours a day on your online business, why do you think you would have the mental attitude/commitment to spend a full day on it? Only quit your job if your income flow is steady.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hippos
    Wow, didn't expect so many responses. Thanks everyone! I was planning to reply to everyone individually, but that would kind of clutter the thread at this point.

    I feel I should also give a little more info about my situation.

    I'm working fulltime.
    Have my own webdevelopment agency on the side (earning pretty good money, but few projects - not really my dream though, not very motivated to get new clients)
    Doing my own website projects (-> this is what I actually want to do in life)
    And at the same time I'm also building my own house, which takes up a lot of my free time.

    So just to be clear: I'm not lazy. It's not that I'm not motivated enough to work on it. But at this point I have about 1 hour of "family time" left every day, and that includes weekends! There is just not enough time to do it all.

    At the same time, because I work a lot, I managed to have enough savings to last about 3 years. So I wouldn't have to go straight into panic mode.

    Though I'm not really looking forward to wasting all my savings either.

    Lastly, failure is indeed not the best word to describe my situation. I have build some good stuff, not even close to replacing my job, but definately something I can build on.

    What makes me believe I can do it now, after 15 years of failure? Well, for 15 years I've been building stuff. "If you build it, they will come". Well, some did come. But now I never did any marketing. Very silly that it took me 15 years to realise. But it's also a consequence of not having a lot of time. I used to work for months on a project, and when it was finally ready, I was exhausted! But actually, that should have been only step 1.

    I'm working on something big now, planning to do everything right this time. Perhaps that is the best advice, finish that project and see if it's successful.

    I'm exhausted, but hopefully it will be worth it in the end. There's no way I could ever give up the dream.
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    • Profile picture of the author zdebx
      Originally Posted by Hippos View Post

      Wow, didn't expect so many responses. Thanks everyone! I was planning to reply to everyone individually, but that would kind of clutter the thread at this point.

      I feel I should also give a little more info about my situation.

      I'm working fulltime.
      Have my own webdevelopment agency on the side (earning pretty good money, but few projects - not really my dream though, not very motivated to get new clients)
      Doing my own website projects (-> this is what I actually want to do in life)
      And at the same time I'm also building my own house, which takes up a lot of my free time.

      So just to be clear: I'm not lazy. It's not that I'm not motivated enough to work on it. But at this point I have about 1 hour of "family time" left every day, and that includes weekends! There is just not enough time to do it all.

      At the same time, because I work a lot, I managed to have enough savings to last about 3 years. So I wouldn't have to go straight into panic mode.

      Though I'm not really looking forward to wasting all my savings either.

      Lastly, failure is indeed not the best word to describe my situation. I have build some good stuff, not even close to replacing my job, but definately something I can build on.

      What makes me believe I can do it now, after 15 years of failure? Well, for 15 years I've been building stuff. "If you build it, they will come". Well, some did come. But now I never did any marketing. Very silly that it took me 15 years to realise. But it's also a consequence of not having a lot of time. I used to work for months on a project, and when it was finally ready, I was exhausted! But actually, that should have been only step 1.

      I'm working on something big now, planning to do everything right this time. Perhaps that is the best advice, finish that project and see if it's successful.

      I'm exhausted, but hopefully it will be worth it in the end. There's no way I could ever give up the dream.
      Have you thought about modelling other people's success?

      And I don't mean "copy/paste" modelling, but what I'm saying is instead of sitting there and scratching your head thinking what to do for the next project, do some research, find people who successfully do what you want to do and find out how they did it.

      See if you can improve on what they have done, possibly add something of your own, re-brand it, market it and if your offer is better than the competition, then the money will come.

      Of course, this is a very simplified plan, but I'm sure you get the point.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shay S
      As a web developer myself, my personal frustration was working on long projects that didn't yield any money (due to lack of budget before launching), so it made me change my whole perspective from focusing too much on the technical stuff and start focusing more on the things that actually matters... Market research, finding niches, finding good selling products. I even got into Wordpress which I hated before, just to focus more on marketing.

      This ^ what generates money, sitting in front of a computer writing code and hoping for the best just didn't work for me.. Maybe it's your story too I don't know, just thought i'll share it in case you can resonate with!
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  • Profile picture of the author cobrasnake
    Recently I have a permanent job, I still spend 2-3 time to do affiliate marketing. I don't get success, but I think I learn so many knowledge about internet marketing section.
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  • Profile picture of the author skymann
    Everyone has to go through some kind of apprenticeship period.
    We all make mistakes all the time, but never give up

    Learn what your prospective customers really want and need and give it to them
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  • Profile picture of the author soflanetworking
    Life is a learning experience, keep plugging away, you will get there.
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  • Profile picture of the author brutecky
    From what you said yourself it sounds like you where never doing online business. A business is not a hobby or something you do on the side for 'pocket money'. It sounds like you never treated it as a real full time business and thus never got to that level.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexis Gil
    You shouldn't quit your job before you will not be sure on 200% that you make a right choose. And you can be sure only after getting certain results. But to see these results you should determine measurable goals. Good luck with your next 50 years of success!
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  • Profile picture of the author marydelacroix
    You have more time than you think to start and work on your online business AFTER your 9-5. So start of with consciously identifying what you will sacrifice to succeed in your business (binge-watching TV/netflix/youtube, facebook (Photo taking, uploading, scrolling and commenting), playing video games, other hobbies and etc.)

    Think of it this way, how can you think strategically for your business and make the best decisions if you are worried about bills, desperate for money and etc.?
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  • Profile picture of the author gingerninjas
    What if you failed.

    Wouldn't it be worth seeing so you don't regret.

    My advice, take the plunge - do something that scares you because that is really when you'll start to enjoy what you're doing. Of course you're going to be bloody scared some weeks if you'll be able to pay the bills but you will be free of the fear of never giving it a go.

    You sound motivated, I would just give it a red hot crack.

    Make sure you know what you're doing and you're amazing at your niche and go for it. In the meantime, give your notice and start building up your client base a bit more, it may mean a few sleepless nights but it's worth it.

    I sold a heck of a lot of crap on eBay to gather a little bit of cash when I started out. I had a month or so saved up for bills and I went for it.

    I don't think you have failed at all over the last 15 years by the sounds of it. If you have three years of savings, you're well and truly ahead of the game finance-wise plus you can get business loans if needed anyway.

    I have a business that has little to no overheads - technology and a few contractors for design work now and again but most of my costs are covered by 50% upfront deposits from my clients.

    Make sure you check in and let us know how you go.
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  • Profile picture of the author 12Magazine
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