How to write Dear John Letter to my client?

3 replies
Here's my problem. When a client doesn't need my services anymore, then he or she doesn't bother to invest too much time nor emotion in an explanation. All I get is an email with two or three lines tops. I regret to inform you, but I don't longer need blah blah. Some of them are so thoughtful that they don't bother to answer my emails, messages, and Skype calls. When I finally catch them, they are apologizing for not having the courage to tell me that the things have changed in the meantime. Seriously? All I wanted was a straight answer, so I know my situation. Was that so difficult to get in the first place? I really don't mind and I'm so full of understanding. The things can change in a day. What am I saying? The things can change in a blink of an eye. A client can find someone who can do the same job for less money, deliver better quality, or be more available than I am at the moment. OK, I get it. Really no problem. A client can get in a financial trouble. Despite all good intentions and honest hopes, we have to part ways unexpectedly, I get it again. Most importantly I really don't mind.

Now, let's see the other side of the same story. I have to say goodbye for some reason. But, rest assured I never do such a thing in the hour of client's deepest need. We finish one working cycle and I find something more profitable for my situation. The work with a better payment rate or with more creative freedom. I feel like I'm divorcing, at least to say. I'm dead worried what's going to happen to a client I'm leaving. Yet, we live in such a competitive world that is hard to believe that someone can't be replaced in a matter of minutes. Especially when it comes to blogs and web content writing. This is the moment when I'm having troubles understanding myself. My clients can be so heartless when leaving me regardless of the reason, but when I have to do the same I'm so thoughtful and emotional. The worst part is that I'm paralyzed when it comes to writing a Dear John letter or making a goodbye Skype call.

What are your experiences in these situations? Sometimes I feel it's one trouble to find a client, but then it is a completely different and even much worse problem leaving that client. I read somewhere that some people experiencing trouble with emotional relationships do anything and everything for their partner to leave them eventually. For some reason they don't have the courage or it is too unpleasant for them to say goodbye. So instead, they are making their own version of the movie How to lose a guy in 10 days. Was that the right title? Honestly I can't remember, but you can clearly get my point. Right? I just want to treat my clients the same way the treat me. I need you, I pay you. I don't need you, I say goodbye, no time to cry. This may sound ridiculous, but sometimes I think I have a much bigger heart than my clients. The things can also change for my, can't they? I also have every right to fight for better jobs and clients, haven't I?

It's not my guilty conscience that gets in my way. Again, I don't do these things in the hour of need for my clients. I also make sure that there's a warning in advance and that a client I have to leave has enough time to find a proper replacement. So, what is my problem? Really. I just don't get it. I just want to be more professional and less emotional about it. OK, I admit it, I want to be heartless about it. I want to treat it as a simple math. The numbers simply don't match at the certain point in time, and I want to find a new formula that works for me. I'm not exaggerating at all when I say that I have always treated my clients much better than they used to treat me in return. Maybe that's the reason I'm having this problem in the first place. What do you think?
#client #dear #john #letter #write
  • Profile picture of the author David Beroff
    Good Heavens! Two or three sentences is perfectly sufficient; if you find yourself spending more energy than that, it's definitely your problem, not theirs. As you said yourself, they wouldn't (and don't) write you more than a few words to terminate the relationship, so neither should you. You can be friendly, polite, professional, and still keep it short and simple. (And yes, that even goes for the few that you wish to keep as actual friends.) Trust me, no client expects a novel, and once they read the first sentence, it'll get tossed into the trashcan, anyway.
    Signature
    Put MY voice on YOUR video: AwesomeAmericanAudio.com
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10908064].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    Can you work with both clients or are you unhappy with the current client and have chosen a replacement?
    You are the business owner. Nobody else can fire a client but you so send an email if you don't want to Skype but keep the lines of communication open. Perhaps later you may work with that client again.
    Signature

    Cheers, Laurence. Writer/Editor/Proofreader.
    Website / Blog for more info.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10908339].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author pinkknight
      Originally Posted by laurencewins View Post

      Can you work with both clients or are you unhappy with the current client and have chosen a replacement?
      You are the business owner. Nobody else can fire a client but you so send an email if you don't want to Skype but keep the lines of communication open. Perhaps later you may work with that client again.
      Can't recall that saying. Something about leaving a door open or not burning all of the bridges, lol. It happens. You're right. Guess, this is something normal to expect. To have this kind of a break or "pause" while working with the certain client. Appreciated.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10908489].message }}

Trending Topics