Amazon Affiliate Sites

by Jw0847
30 replies
I am thinking most shoppers go directly to Amazon when looking to buy physical goods. Am I missing something? I know the theory is an affiliate site is supposed to have more info and reviews but every general shopper I ask says they just go directly to Amazon and look at the reviews there. This makes me think in 2017 an Amazon affiliate site has little hope for real success.

Help me out here. - Thanks John.
#affiliate #amazon #sites
  • Profile picture of the author SiteNameSales
    I have some Amazon affiliate sites that make a few dollars here and there. My primary purpose for them is to sell the domain name, not the website per se, so I don't spend a lot of time with them.

    The point is that I get some traffic - particularly around the holidays. Not everyone automatically clicks on Amazon when doing a search and shoppers have different feelings about Amazon either way.

    Also, considering the number of courses on this and the various software and plugins that facilitate Amazon affiliate sites, I'd have to assume that people are making money.

    How many, how much and how often is information I'm sure other members of the Warrior Forum can answer in some detail.
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  • Profile picture of the author djayturner85
    Sometimes customers don't know what product they want to buy until you show it to them.
    Obviously if a customer is searching for a specific product on the internet then they probably will go directly to Amazon but if you show them a product they haven't seen yet and then direct them to amazon with your affiliate link, then this will drop a cookie into their browser which will give you commissions on any purchases made thereafter.

    I know for a fact that there are many people making 6 figures a year through Amazon Affiliate commissions. I think it just takes some clever marketing tactics to achieve this.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nicholas Cross
    These are all good comments.

    You can make money affiliate marketing for Amazon.com. It comes down to plenty of research, testing, and luck.

    Here is an example:

    If you have a long tail phrase that is being commonly searched (1,000+ a month in my opinion) and doesn't have high competition/ high PR sites competing, then you might be in luck.

    You see, when someone is searching for a product, many times they'll search things like "best scissors to hair dressers" or "best video games for 16 year olds". They'll be brought to a list of websites that will answer their question with a review, and a lot of the time Amazon.com won't be in the top 10. The appropriate SEO choices are key.

    Not to mention that consumerist.com reported that nearly 70% go online and seek out reviews before actually purchasing a product. With statistics like that, I'll be the middle man any day.

    1. Good niche
    2. Keyword research
    3. Quality content
    4. Outsource reputable backlinking
    5. Wait/ Rinse/ Repeat

    What does everyone else think?
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    • Profile picture of the author davejarvys
      Originally Posted by SiteNameSales View Post

      Also, considering the number of courses on this and the various software and plugins that facilitate Amazon affiliate sites, I'd have to assume that people are making money.
      The only real conclusion you can draw from that is there are people making money selling to people who want to make money on Amazon.

      Originally Posted by Nicholas Cross View Post

      If you have a long tail phrase that is being commonly searched (1,000+ a month in my opinion) and doesn't have high competition/ high PR sites competing, then you might be in luck.
      I've a friend who targets terms with just 200 searches a month per key phrase. He often says that there are two secrets to an Amazon affiliate site.

      * It doesn't matter what you sell the trick is to get them to Amazon. Amazon will do the rest for you.

      * You need to give people a reason to return to your site. Too many sites focus on getting the sale but never think about the life time customer value to themselves.
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      • Profile picture of the author markowe
        Originally Posted by davejarvys View Post


        * It doesn't matter what you sell the trick is to get them to Amazon. Amazon will do the rest for you.
        This ^^. I sometimes think the trick is having the best, most clickable "Buy from Amazon" button. I have made regular sales for years now from some old CGI-script-based site I set up an age ago, it looks absolutely awful, it's basically text-only, but it has a huge great "See it on Amazon" button under every product, and that seems to do the trick!
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        Who says you can't earn money as an eBay affiliate any more? My stats say otherwise

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  • Profile picture of the author heenal
    Main is the KW research and good backlinking strategy

    Any good know source for backlinking which can be recommended?

    Heenal
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  • Profile picture of the author DATruk
    Reading Amazon reviews is what I personally do, AFTER researching key points of fit and function for my purposes. Important information might include ideas and other considerations regarding a product, which are rarely found in reviews. Reviews like " I bought this and it works great!", or " I had product X before but this product Y is much better..." don't really provide a lot of information other than someones relatively immediate experience with the new product.

    So I get a domain name and build this website (several actually, varying the target audiences) after deciding on an evergreen market. As the market is highly competitive online and offline, I had to drill down to find a niche that had less competition. What I aimed for was providing addition information to shoppers in need of these products. My research provided the details for articles of product information to think about, beyond what was available from Amazon reviews for each product line. Not too hard to do. Instead of focusing on how great this one product is, I provided information about the product line in general, focusing on key considerations any buyer should think about to make sure they select the procuct that fits all their needs. Then I presented to them their choices through the Amazon store link software I used at the time. Without looking it up I don't remember which, but one of those Wordpress plugin instant Amazon store thingys. I'd guess any one of them would work fine.

    After my flurry of activity researching, copywriting, setting up the tech stuff (domain name, hosting, affiliate app forms, etc.), I wound up with something that looked good and provided good information to shoppers, at least in my opinion. Then I got distracted by life, other ideas, projects and so on, and left this to sit on its own. Instant results were not forthcoming, and by instant I mean today or this week. My analytics knowledge at the time was weaker than it is now, so looking at the simple analytics data from plugins freely available for Wordpress installations was wasted on my little mind. I also got so bored and tired of writing for a market that was not in my heart. So I let this website float on its own.

    Neglected, abandoned and yes even forgotten, this little experiment did not resurface until after domain expiration, when I discovered emails from Amazon saying sales had been made at some time in the past and they had money for me, somehow missed by me in all emails I receive. That's not how to run a business, just so you know, but I did learn some things.

    Firstly, focus on a niche of products within a market. Don't try to sell everything Amazon has for sale. It is too easy to drop an Amazon store plugin into Wordpress then just let Amazon decide what to present. Don't try to be an Amazon. At that time and as I understood it, a shopper soon to be buyer could click my affiliate link to Amazon and presto! now ANYTHING they bought from Amazon within a certain time limited period of hours days weeks, I don't remember, earned me a commission. Maybe things are different now.
    Secondly, as you mention "...more info and reviews..." is important. Specifically, I found the "more info" part something that I could provide that is lacking on Amazon. There is no discussion of what makes one dogfood better than another, just sales talk about one product at a time. So there was the more info gap I could fill. And reviews? I don't expect to ever outdo Amazon on reviews.
    Thirdly, once this is set up have the patience to wait for at least some results. Even no traffic is a result pointing to a problem that needs fixing. I must have had some traffic to get sales, but I don't remember doing anything to promote my webpage. I did do internal SEO in some depth, right down to renaming images with longer tail keywords and so on. That was about it before the neglect part. I don't even know how people found this webpage I built. What I know now is that once your system is set up, the real work is in getting the traffic to it. A drop in the ocean wanting to be noticed.

    As Nicholas mentions, shoppers seek out info before purchasing. This seems to be the only explanation for my web/salespage success. Not a huge success due to lack of nurturing, but a kind of "set and forget" success, something I couldn't recommend for any business.

    As davejarvys mentions, "You need to give people a reason to return to your site." As my site had info on several complimentary products within that niche market, I suppose they had reason to return for info on those other products besides the one they had been interested in when they found my site. I have no idea, as this was a forgotten project that I paid absolutely no attention to.

    My point is that an Amazon site can be successful if you use keywords deep into the niche, internally SEO your site, provide good information generally about how to compare specific products the shopper is looking for, and provide enough links to get the shopper to click your Amazon affiliate link. Maybe things have changed. When I have time I will probably revisit this niche, now that I know a little more about outsourcing and other things.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      A common technique used by many top Amazon affiliates is to regularly produce articles and submit these to nich-relevant online/offline publications.

      This can quickly generate massive amounts of highly convertible traffic, and actually is much more effective and focused than depending upon search engines for traffic.

      It is also essential to capture buyers' contact information for promoting progressively higher-end products.
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  • Profile picture of the author EPoltrack77
    You know as an associate your only starting out at 4% commission. A $20 sale you make 80 cents.

    Now lets take a look at a profit!

    You take that same amazon product and go list it on ebay and sell it for $24.50

    Minus some seller fee's a couple of bucks is better than 80 cents.

    No worrying about traffic. Ebay provides it all...
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    Free Video Training Sharing The Steps To Succeed With Affiliate Marketing.
    Get Access At www.cbaffiliatecareer.com
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  • Profile picture of the author DWaters
    Originally Posted by Jw0847 View Post

    I am thinking most shoppers go directly to Amazon when looking to buy physical goods. Am I missing something? I know the theory is an affiliate site is supposed to have more info and reviews but every general shopper I ask says they just go directly to Amazon and look at the reviews there. This makes me think in 2017 an Amazon affiliate site has little hope for real success.

    Help me out here. - Thanks John.

    The stat that I have heard is that about 45% of online buyers go straight to Amazon. This makes so much sense. If you are offline and looking to buy something don't you go directly to the store where you will find it for sale?


    I know lots of people who buy most things on Amazon. Why would they go somewhere else first?
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    Want to get rich with top rated FREE Super Affiliate Training?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by DWaters View Post

      The stat that I have heard is that about 45% of online buyers go straight to Amazon. This makes so much sense. If you are offline and looking to buy something don't you go directly to the store where you will find it for sale?


      I know lots of people who buy most things on Amazon. Why would they go somewhere else first?
      I've heard roughly the same stats, but an additional 30-35% or so of Amazon sales is through their own very aggressive in-house marketing system, which produces repeat orders and/or progressively higher end sales.

      Affiliates generate 20% or perhaps even less of total Amazon sales. Nearly all affiliates are leaving piles and piles of money on the table by just sending their traffic to Amazon without collecting contact information for additional promotions.
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      • Profile picture of the author discrat
        Originally Posted by myob View Post


        Affiliates generate 20% or perhaps even less of total Amazon sales.
        myob,
        In all due respect, Iam thinking much, much less than that. Good lawd that would be an incredible amount of affiliates. making unbelievable amounts of cash if that were the case. If you looked at quarterly revenue for AMZN, there is just no way affiliates could generate that figure.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by discrat View Post

          myob,
          In all due respect, Iam thinking much, much less than that. Good lawd that would be an incredible amount of affiliates. making unbelievable amounts of cash if that were the case. If you looked at quarterly revenue for AMZN, there is just no way affiliates could generate that figure.
          Affiliates aren't necessarily earning much (most earn nothing at all) from the traffic they generate for Amazon. For example the typical review site may convert around 8%, but the rest (92% of visitors) make their purchase outside of Amazon's 24 hour cookie limit. Amazon gets the sale, but the affiliate is left out and not paid commission. Essentially, free traffic for Amazon. You can bet that Amazon would cancel their affiliate program if it wasn't contributing significantly to their bottom line.
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  • Profile picture of the author shmol
    I will usually look around for reviews and just in general to see what other people are saying about a product.

    So, I will go through several pages--especially if it is a big purchase.

    But, I realize that I am probably the exception rather than the rule.

    With that said, I agree, with the comment that, all you really need to do is get people to amazon through your link--as they will do the rest of the work for you.

    Hope the helps
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  • Profile picture of the author F360
    The number of Google searches for "product review" is astronomical.

    If you can build a website, get these people too it, then send them to Amazon...you can make a lot of money.
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  • Profile picture of the author shellerik
    My website is on pace to earn about $2,500 this month from Amazon affiliate commissions and it does not include any product reviews. Remember that being an Amazon Associate is simply a way to monetize a website. While most people think "Amazon Affiliate" equals "product reviews" it can be used on many types of websites, in my case I built a product search engine.

    So why do people come to my site instead of going directly to Amazon? It is easier to find what they want on my site than by searching on Amazon (for my niche).

    Here are some ways I provide value above and beyond what Amazon provides:
    • More specifications about each item than Amazon
    • More accurate specifications (users can provide feedback/corrections)
    • More search criteria (about 40 so far)
    • More sorting options (currently five)
    • Most popular model lists (calculated using model views and Amazon's sales ranking)
    • Side-by-side model comparisons (all specifications for any two models)
    • Lists of similar models (for any model being viewed, based on dozens of criteria)
    • Recommended accessories (as appropriate for each model)
    • Links to owner's manuals
    • Seven region/currency options (international Amazons)
    • Email alerts when models become available for purchase
    • Email alerts when a model price drops below a specified value
    • Buyer's guide
    • Tool that calculates the date of production for an item based on the model and serial number
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    • Profile picture of the author shiftyeyes
      Originally Posted by shellerik View Post

      My website is on pace to earn about $2,500 this month from Amazon affiliate commissions and it does not include any product reviews. Remember that being an Amazon Associate is simply a way to monetize a website. While most people think "Amazon Affiliate" equals "product reviews" it can be used on many types of websites, in my case I built a product search engine.

      So why do people come to my site instead of going directly to Amazon? It is easier to find what they want on my site than by searching on Amazon (for my niche).

      Here are some ways I provide value above and beyond what Amazon provides:
      • More specifications about each item than Amazon
      • More accurate specifications (users can provide feedback/corrections)
      • More search criteria (about 40 so far)
      • More sorting options (currently five)
      • Most popular model lists (calculated using model views and Amazon's sales ranking)
      • Side-by-side model comparisons (all specifications for any two models)
      • Lists of similar models (for any model being viewed, based on dozens of criteria)
      • Recommended accessories (as appropriate for each model)
      • Links to owner's manuals
      • Seven region/currency options (international Amazons)
      • Email alerts when models become available for purchase
      • Email alerts when a model price drops below a specified value
      • Buyer's guide
      • Tool that calculates the date of production for an item based on the model and serial number
      Thanks for info. Quick question: does Amazon want you to have steady traffic on your site when you sign up? Or could you make a new site and sporadically pay traffic to go their? I derped around with this last year and was not approved after I sold something. I now know to follow their TOS very specifically
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    Originally Posted by Jw0847 View Post

    I am thinking most shoppers go directly to Amazon when looking to buy physical goods. Am I missing something? I know the theory is an affiliate site is supposed to have more info and reviews but every general shopper I ask says they just go directly to Amazon and look at the reviews there. This makes me think in 2017 an Amazon affiliate site has little hope for real success.

    Help me out here. - Thanks John.
    I think the thing to remember is not everyone is as tech-savy, it also depends on how you promote the sites, for example if someone is looking for reviews on a product and they search for reviews and come across your site, click on the links and decide to buy - this is one way.

    There is obviously others as well (think retargeting, etc).

    I think it's more about how you are driving traffic to these sites than just the sites alone.
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  • Profile picture of the author pardu
    Money can be made from amazon affiliates sites but you have to face same issue of traffic.Basically you have to spend some money on seo before see any profit from affiliates.
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    Moderator's Note: Affiliate link not allowed. Please edit.

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    • Profile picture of the author shiftyeyes
      Originally Posted by pardu View Post

      Money can be made from amazon affiliates sites but you have to face same issue of traffic.Basically you have to spend some money on seo before see any profit from affiliates.
      I'm willing to be patient with SEO this year for affiliate sites. What strategy do you recommend? I would rather stay away from scraping domains and making PBN's.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    One of the keys for me has always been to start a step or two earlier in the buying cycle, when people are aware of a problem or desire, want to do something about it, but don't know what the alternatives are yet.

    Guiding these people through an educational process, and capturing their contact info along the way, often means they don't go directly to Amazon because the link is right there and clicking my link is easier than typing in "Amazon.com" and going through the whole search process again.

    Having that list opens up a world of further opportunities. Not only can you add things like accessories, but you can take people through a progression of product upgrades as they gain experience in a niche. Fishing is my favorite example, but it works in many pursuits.

    > Person wants to learn how to fish. They know they need some tackle, but the rows of brightly colored gear are overwhelming, and range of prices even more so. So they go online...

    > They find a series of "Beginner's Guide to._________" and start reading about how to catch trout in streams, bass in ponds, etc. At the end, they are offered a content upgrade on selecting the right equipment.

    > In exchange for their email address, they get a shopping list of basic equipment and a short buying guide for some of the items (like rods and reels). Links go to a web page that shows an image of the item and points out the relevant points from the buying guide. The image is linked to Amazon. There's also a small box that says something like "if you want to save time, you can just buy this item and skip the hunting. Spend your time fishing instead." with additional links to Amazon.

    > Sometimes I'll use an interstitial instead of the above. It will say something like "we're taking you Amazon to see our recommended selection. If you decide to buy it, come back to this page and enter your email and receipt number (thanks for this, myob) and I'll send you [bonus]"

    > As they continue to grow in the sport, they'll want to upgrade or add to their original tackle purchases. And I'll be there to help them do that.
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  • Profile picture of the author wiseowl
    My concern with an amazon affiliate site is that they never click the link on my site. They see what they were researching for and then realize it's on amazon and then go to amazon directly to get it as they don't want to sign in while in any way connected to my site for security reasons. Even the avg. internet user is pretty security conscious these days.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by wiseowl View Post

      My concern with an amazon affiliate site is that they never click the link on my site. They see what they were researching for and then realize it's on amazon and then go to amazon directly to get it as they don't want to sign in while in any way connected to my site for security reasons. Even the avg. internet user is pretty security conscious these days.
      This is actually a very common problem for Amazon affiliates, and which perhaps is the primary reason that "review" sites are nearly always so dismally ineffective. Savvy Amazon shoppers have known for a long time that these properties are thinly disguised promotions with little intrinsic value for making unbiased purchasing decisions.

      A far more effective approach that I've been using with extremely high levels of success for the past 20+ years is to first establish a conspicuous authoritative presence in your targeted markets. This includes article syndication widely in online/offline publications which are read by your prospects.

      Secondly, build a list of buyers of closely related products. I have found Clickbank to be a good network to build initial lists of buyers, because they have an unconditional money-back guarantee on all of their products. Building up trust through successive transactions can bind your subscribers much faster than endless emails full of warm fuzzies and freebies.

      And rather than putting up cheesy "review" sites, I have found that strongly recommending one product at a time will dramatically increase conversion rates. People generally have a hard time making a decision when faced with more than one choice. Multiple products at once more often leads to a decision to think it over and buy at a later time - beyond the 24-hour window imposed by Amazon's cookie.

      None of my product sites depend upon the whims of Google. All promotions are sent to my niche lists through email, webinars, social media, telemarketing, seminars, direct mail, personal sales, etc. Note that when doing any of these offsite marketing methods, never mention or hint about Amazon. All affiliate links must come from your own website properties, never direct link to Amazon.
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      • Profile picture of the author wiseowl
        Myob,

        I am more of a direct sales guy anyway. Studied one-on-one with the copywriting legend Gary Halbert. So I've been looking for information on using rented lists (in addition to the long term building my own).

        I wasn't aware that clickbank rented their list... am I right in understanding what you said?
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    Sad to say, lots of Amazon Affiliate sites got HAMMERED hard by Google Fred

    Google Fred's signals include NAKED affiliate links
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    wiseowl,

    You apparently have completely misunderstood my post. I have never rented lists, and never will. My marketing system develops massive quantities of highly convertible traffic in dozens of niches. All lists are developed, managed, and marketed exclusively in-house by my staff.

    My lists consists only of actual buyers who have opted-in after making purchases of relevant recommended products on Clickbank, Amazon, and an MLM company. As these lists become seasoned with incrementally higher end products, additional communication channels are opened up such as social media, webinars, direct mail, telemarketing, local seminars, and even in-person sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author wiseowl
      I did misunderstand you. So how does your comment (intial response to my post) address the issue of having amazon affiliate links? Is it that you don't have an amazon affilate site, but that you make offers through a list built from Clickbank sales on your niche websites?
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by wiseowl View Post

        I did misunderstand you. So how does your comment (intial response to my post) address the issue of having amazon affiliate links? Is it that you don't have an amazon affilate site, but that you make offers through a list built from Clickbank sales on your niche websites?
        All traffic to my Amazon affiliate websites is driven almost exclusively from lists of previous buyers of Clickbank and Amazon products. Nominally priced products are used to build these lists.

        After every purchase, customers are introduced to incrementally higher end products relevant to their interests. The process continues until they unsubscribe or no longer buy.

        It is essential to always provide compelling reasons to buy from you. Demonstrate your expertise in the niche and the products. Generally the vendor website can be a resource for additional product information and marketing collateral.
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  • Profile picture of the author ANDREIS
    Originally Posted by Jw0847 View Post

    I am thinking most shoppers go directly to Amazon when looking to buy physical goods. Am I missing something? I know the theory is an affiliate site is supposed to have more info and reviews but every general shopper I ask says they just go directly to Amazon and look at the reviews there. This makes me think in 2017 an Amazon affiliate site has little hope for real success.

    Help me out here. - Thanks John.
    Well, I guess you're thinking that you can't make any money with Amazon if everybody goes straight to Amazon? That's what I was thinking too long time ago, because that's how the logic goes. Here's the truth: most shoppers do go directly to Amazon, but millions of people also go to Google, Bing, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter and other websites and blogs. If they see a product there, and that product is in fact your amazon associate's link, once they click they will come to Amazon through your link. If they buy something on Amazon during the 24 hours you will earn commission, and even beyond that if they added the product to their shopping cart, but completed the purchase later. Amazon is a selling machine, people buy there more easily than anywhere else online. If you get them to Amazon through your link, many will buy something, many times something completely different than what you were initially promoting, and you will earn commission. There are different ways to go about Amazon. You can attract lots of people without thinking too much about the niche and aim for the low to medium priced products, you can also create a highly specialized website and promote very narrow and expensive niche with very targeted audience. The key is traffic, the type of traffic and how you intend to attract it will determine different models. There is no website in the world where people spend money more easily and there are millions of people who are not ready, set, go directly to Amazon. Millions are just reading blogs, sharing photos, commenting on Facebook, watching movies, searching Google, exploring and comparing, learning....waiting to get something they like!
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  • Profile picture of the author amuro
    Originally Posted by Jw0847 View Post

    I am thinking most shoppers go directly to Amazon when looking to buy physical goods. Am I missing something? I know the theory is an affiliate site is supposed to have more info and reviews but every general shopper I ask says they just go directly to Amazon and look at the reviews there. This makes me think in 2017 an Amazon affiliate site has little hope for real success.

    Help me out here. - Thanks John.
    I disagree with that.

    I feel that if you find best selling products on Amazon and compiled them into one niche with valuable content and videos, you can still do very well as Amazon associate.
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