17 replies
Below is a spreadsheet of choices I have come up with for a new niche to try to market for. It has these columns:

B: Volume from keywordseverywhere dot com
C: Volume from app.kwfinder dot com
D: Volume from Googles Keyword Planner
E: Volume from moz dot com
G: Competition from keywordseverywhere dot com
H: Difficulty from app.kwfinder dot com
I: Competition from Googles Keyword Planner

I am using, for now, the free version of all of these tools. SEO is not my field, but I am learning. Rows 10 and 11 look great, but I am uncertain if people searching for those terms have commercial intent--they may be just looking for information. I am trying to sell something however.

Can anyone share what you would pick, just based on the numbers? Obviously there are other factors, such as what I see on Google for each term and what I know of each niche, but based on just the numbers, I am interested if people agree with what I chose.

Here it is:


#choice #keywords #niche
  • Profile picture of the author TenaciousGrease
    I'd pick whichever one has the most passionate buyers
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    • Profile picture of the author brettb
      Originally Posted by TenaciousGrease View Post

      I'd pick whichever one has the most passionate buyers
      +1 for this. I'm in quite a few niches. Online dating is hot, hot, hot and people will readily spend in this niche.

      I'm also in the keyword research niche, and it's pretty sucky. I make a few bucks, but only about 0.5% of what I've made from online dating.
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    • Profile picture of the author absolutelee
      Originally Posted by TenaciousGrease View Post

      I'd pick whichever one has the most passionate buyers
      Makes sense. It all depends on the people in the niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author wordwizard
    The numbers without the actual niche keywords don't tell me enough to make such decisions. I create niche sites for people, not search engines.

    And I also need to know which of the keywords are buying keywords, and which of them cover topics that are of interest to me and/or that I can write about knowledgeably.

    Oh, and then there's that issue of competition and price...

    Way back, I tried to outsmart Google by bidding only on the really cheap keywords when promoting a products - and got Zero results! Google never bothered showing my ad to anyone it seems.
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    • Profile picture of the author unifiedac
      Originally Posted by wordwizard View Post

      And I also need to know which of the keywords are buying keywords, and which of them cover topics that are of interest to me and/or that I can write about knowledgeably.
      I completely agree with this. Some keywords have high volume, low competition, but not a lot of buying power for a global audience. Here's an example:

      "ragdoll kittens"

      This would be a great keyword for a blog that promotes relevant products, but the keyword phrase itself does not bring loads of traffic ready to spend money.

      I try to put myself in the shoes of the person typing the search phrase and ask myself the following questions:
      1. Who is my audience (demographics)?
      2. What is this person's motivation/problem?
      3. What are they expecting to see/find on my site?
      The idea for the niche site (lead generation, ads, ebook, amazon aff, etc.) usually comes first for me, then I find the keywords that match the intention of my desired audience. For me at least, it was always harder to find "golden keyword phrases" and then come up with some niche idea to take advantage of the low competition.
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidFeldman
    Wow, you guys are really good. I did think of some of these things, but not all of them.

    > And I also need to know which of the keywords are buying keywords, and which of them cover topics that are of interest to me and/or that I can write about knowledgeably.

    Let me explain a bit--I am a web host and all the keywords are things that are relevant and I can write out, like "drupal hosting" and "wordpress hosting."

    The only ones that I have a doubt about the commercial intent are 10 and 11 and maybe that's why they're the lowest competition.

    > I'd pick whichever one has the most passionate buyers

    This is really interesting. For the most part, people searching for "drupal hosting" and "wordpress hosting" are the same type of people and same interest level, but for other words, you are right--there are some terms that people get passionate about.

    OK, I think this confirms my hunch anyway. I have lots of more questions, but I will post a fresh thread.

    Thank you!
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  • Profile picture of the author EPoltrack77
    Thats what it is about. Supply and demand. Using the Internet as a tool. Helping to solve a problem. The money comes afterwards
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  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    Group the phrases into ones that you know will be on a certain site and have relatively easy competition. Add a value to what a conversion to each phrase would be.

    After grouping the niche site ideas, multiply the number of searches for ALL of the phrases in that grouping by the dollar amount you assigned to it and come up with a grand total for each niche idea. Pick the one worth the most money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Regional Warrior
    Originally Posted by DavidFeldman View Post

    Below is a spreadsheet of choices I have come up with for a new niche to try to market for. It has these columns:

    B: Volume from keywordseverywhere dot com
    C: Volume from app.kwfinder dot com
    D: Volume from Googles Keyword Planner
    E: Volume from moz dot com
    G: Competition from keywordseverywhere dot com
    H: Difficulty from app.kwfinder dot com
    I: Competition from Googles Keyword Planner

    I am using, for now, the free version of all of these tools. SEO is not my field, but I am learning. Rows 10 and 11 look great, but I am uncertain if people searching for those terms have commercial intent--they may be just looking for information. I am trying to sell something however.

    Can anyone share what you would pick, just based on the numbers? Obviously there are other factors, such as what I see on Google for each term and what I know of each niche, but based on just the numbers, I am interested if people agree with what I chose.
    David

    There is a much easier way just waiting for the approval and you see how
    you may find this a touch better and easier

    Jason
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Originally Posted by DavidFeldman View Post

    Below is a spreadsheet of choices I have come up with for a new niche to try to market for. It has these columns:

    B: Volume from keywordseverywhere dot com
    C: Volume from app.kwfinder dot com
    D: Volume from Googles Keyword Planner
    E: Volume from moz dot com
    G: Competition from keywordseverywhere dot com
    H: Difficulty from app.kwfinder dot com
    I: Competition from Googles Keyword Planner

    I am using, for now, the free version of all of these tools. SEO is not my field, but I am learning. Rows 10 and 11 look great, but I am uncertain if people searching for those terms have commercial intent--they may be just looking for information. I am trying to sell something however.

    Can anyone share what you would pick, just based on the numbers? Obviously there are other factors, such as what I see on Google for each term and what I know of each niche, but based on just the numbers, I am interested if people agree with what I chose.

    Here it is:








    Those numbers are meaningless.

    We have no idea what your selling, the keywords, niche or even If you're capable of outranking the weakest SERP competion (no offense).
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    • Profile picture of the author DavidFeldman
      Those numbers are meaningless.

      We have no idea what your selling, the keywords, niche or even If you're capable of outranking the weakest SERP competion (no offense).
      My initial post didn't mention it, yes, but I wrote in a later post:

      Let me explain a bit--I am a web host and all the keywords are things that are relevant and I can write out, like "drupal hosting" and "wordpress hosting."

      The only ones that I have a doubt about the commercial intent are 10 and 11 and maybe that's why they're the lowest competition.
      That answers some of your questions. I also don't know if I can outrank them, but some of the first page Google results have low ratings for things like domain authority and inbound links, so I think I have a chance.

      Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Project Sniper
    You probably spent allot of time putting all of that together. I can promise it was all a waste of time. I've never understood why anyone would use excel to document their keywords..I just use notepad. excel just wastes your time..you also need a keyword tool..

    I use keysearch.co and https://clevergizmos.com/keyword-researcher/ and I just stumbled across this yesterday
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    O_O I LOVE KEYWORD RESEARCHER...STOP USING EXCEL
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    If you constrain me to just the numbers posted, the first one I'd pick for further research is the one with the $26 avg CPC. That, and the high competition for ad slots (that's what that is, not the competition for organic ranking) tells me that there's money to be made IF I can connect with those people profitably.

    My next step would be to take a step or two backward in the buying process. Focusing on buyer keywords is fine if you want to fight it out with all the other people bidding on those keywords, or fighting for SERP positions.

    Since you mentioned hosting, let's use that as an example.

    Rather than focus on people who have already decided on "Wordpress hosting" or "Drupal hosting", I might start with "Which platform should I choose?" I'd set up a series of pages much like those old "pick your adventure" books, where the story would reach various decision points and you'd get "if you choose [option A] turn to page xx, if you choose [option B] go to the next page..."

    At the end of the line, they've picked a platform. Now they're ready for hosting, and between the trust you've built during this 'adventure' and some basic laziness, it's easy to send them to your chosen affiliate (or package if you're the actual host/reseller).

    Make sense?
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    Instead of just selecting one, why not pick a few and try to diversify?
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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    In my experience, there is no KW "tool" that is even close to accurate. Try two different tools, you get two different results.

    You need to test before you make any decisions. There was a time you could throw up a landing page on Adwords and very quickly determine the search volume and commercial intent.

    Now the best thing you can do is test on Bing.

    Putting time, effort or money into any KWs without testing first can end badly.
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidFeldman
    Rather than focus on people who have already decided on "Wordpress hosting" or "Drupal hosting", I might start with "Which platform should I choose?" I'd set up a series of pages much like those old "pick your adventure" books, where the story would reach various decision points and you'd get "if you choose [option A] turn to page xx, if you choose [option B] go to the next page..."
    This is a great idea in theory, but I don't know if in reality it pans out--not sure a good such search exists (that has monthly searches) and that would actually generate sales.

    Instead of just selecting one, why not pick a few and try to diversify?
    Because I want to focus on one and blog/promote well and be very competitive in that. Jack of all trades, master of none.

    Putting time, effort or money into any KWs without testing first can end badly.
    This is true. I made a test last year and got one sale in one year. But I have a whole new approach now--I am studying white hat SEO now and learning a lot of very interesting and intelligent ideas that I feel are realistic.

    Thank you!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by DavidFeldman View Post

      This is a great idea in theory, but I don't know if in reality it pans out--not sure a good such search exists (that has monthly searches) and that would actually generate sales.
      If you insist on looking for one magic keyword, you may be right. In practice, focusing on the results people want rather than a magic search term has always worked and always will.

      Look at the infomercials on TV. Or even the short form ads.

      They start out with some normal looking person spazzing out trying to fry an egg, drain pasta or dry their hair. Then they get Miracle Product, and suddenly they're Emeril Lagasse or Paul Mitchell. None of them target "buy Miracle Product." They target "tasty food without effort" or "pretty hair without the salon visit."

      Come to think of it, my approach isn't even focused on immediate sales. It's focused on identifying potential sales and turning them into leads. If I do my job right, it doesn't matter who is competing for "buy Miracle Product." My leads will never see them because they'll have followed my link without searching the magic keyword.
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