Offline Marketing Experts - TRUE or FALSE

12 replies
TRUE or FALSE:

Offline businesses are not interested in learning how to do online marketing themselves. It makes no sense to try to sell them a DIY type product and you should just stick to offering "do it for you" services.
#experts #false #marketing #offline #true
  • Profile picture of the author smisen
    Both - I've worked with offline business owners who didn't have the time to learn IM strategies, as well as those who actually got interested in web marketing when they built websites for their businesses. Some are hardcore DIY-ers (they do their own taxes, legal filings, etc), so they're more likely to pay for a training tool than to actually outsource the work.

    It's usually really easy to figure out which ones are which after talking to them for a few minutes, though.
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  • Profile picture of the author Shane N
    FALSE

    Why? Because you phrased it as if ALL offline businesses would be uninterested... Whereas there are clearly a number of business owners who are willing to learn (and perhaps would rather learn) how to do it themselves to save money, etc.

    If you could create an easy-to-understand DIY product -- you may be able to sell it to a large number of businesses!

    Best,
    Shane
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Douglas
      Originally Posted by Shane Natan View Post

      FALSE:

      Why? Because you said it as if ALL offline businesses would be uninterested... Whereas there are clearly a number of business owners who are willing to learn (and perhaps would rather learn, to save money).

      Best,
      Shane
      Good point. From your experience, is it a meaningful percentage worthy of targeting with a marketing campaign?
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
      FALSE. It depends on what service or online marketing method you're talking about having them do on their own. Some business owners like rolling their sleeves up and doing it themselves... or their cashflow dictates that they do it themselves.

      It's two price points as well... for example, learning how to write and post your own blog articles versus paying someone to do write and post them for you.

      Why not offer them both -- the DIY product and your professional services -- and let them decide which one they prefer?
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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Douglas
        Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

        FALSE. It depends on what service or online marketing method you're talking about having them do on their own. Some business owners like rolling their sleeves up and doing it themselves... or their cashflow dictates that they do it themselves.

        It's two price points as well... for example, learning how to write and post your own blog articles versus paying someone to do write and post them for you.

        Why not offer them both -- the DIY product and your professional services -- and let them decide which one they prefer?
        Good point Mike!

        I actually have an easy to follow DIY course and outsourcing services both ready to go.

        I'm also planning to have private label and reseller options for both the physical product (drop ship) and the services.

        I'm really just trying to get a feel for the demand.
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        • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
          From your experience, is it a meaningful percentage worthy of targeting with a marketing campaign?
          Ron,

          What you'll find is that there is a significant percentage of real-world (non-Internet) businesses that will purchase a reasonably priced do-it-yourself teaching tool and then realize that they don't have the time, inclination, knowledge, energy and/or talent to implement what it was teaching. Then they hire the creator of the product to implement it for them.

          For example, in the summer of 2008 I taught a teleseminar course on web site copy and makeovers. Many of the participants wanted to use the knowledge on their own web sites as well in working with clients. One of those participants ended up hiring me to do it for him, though. He spent $1000 on the course and then $3500 to have me fix his web site copy, and considered it all well spent.

          He would not have hired me to work on his web site copy had he not been in the course.

          I have experienced this at other price points, also.

          Hope that is helpful to you!

          Marcia Yudkin
          Signature
          Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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          • Profile picture of the author TimCastleman
            I'm always late to the dance.

            People are lazy.

            They have time or they have money, very few have both.

            When I actually sell to offline businesses (instead of just selling WSO's about it) I give them both solutions.

            The cheaper one is the DIY, the higher cost one is DFY.

            Most go with the second option because they want it done for them and more importantly somoene to blame when things go wrong.

            Hope that helps Ron.

            Tim
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    False. They're all interested in it. Being able is another story.

    Depends on the size of business Ron. If you're talking $1mil and under, then you are probaby going to find more people that even if they wanted to DIY, they are simply not going to have the time.

    In larger businesses, there is usually someone dedicated to sales, or an office manager type, etc...

    I have sold far more "do it for you" in my lifetime, but with the forthcoming launch of Kaizen Marketing Blueprint, I am taking a twofold approach. (well, technically 3-fold)

    Keep in mind, KMB isn't a marketing technique or tactic, but a management system to build out a complete, end-to-end marketing and sales process using continuous process improvement techniques found in traditional Lean and Six Sigma - so I will have far more appeal to the management or owner because it cuts to the very core of the business operation itself at the strategic level.

    First, I do offer direct consulting. I am really expensive, and I guarantee my results on a performance basis.

    Second, I am teaching the KMB as a system to direct, end-users as a DIY product. If you need assistance, I have various levels of consulting/coaching support.

    Third, I have created a marketing consultant development tier, which allows someone interested in doing the same thing for business clients to 1) sell KMB products 2) build consulting revenue 3) develop a system for additional marketing tactics like all the stuff that gets kicked around here in reference to the "offline" space.... SEO, site design, etc...

    In this manner, I think I am covering all the bases to maximize my own efforts in the marketplace.

    I can do this because the field of marketing and sales process engineering is an emerging one, with just a handful of players globally. Building a branded system vs. my personal "guru" identity lends itself much better to this as well.

    Dunno how well this kind of approach would work on the tactical level for actual marketing techniques (SEO, email list building, etc...), but the closest that I have found would be John Jantsch's Duct Tape Marketing. He seems to be doing okay with his approach, and is charging a bunch of money for his consulting licensing program.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
    Ron I would have to say "false." I've been self-employed all my work life, and a large number of the people with whom my wife and I associate are businesses owners.

    A dozen or so years ago I taught myself enough HTML to be dangerious, and used Windows Notepad, to began doing my own websites. It was a PITA. Some years later I learned GoLive then learned Kompozer and Dreamweaver.

    But I certainly don't claim to be normal - or even totally sane. It must have something to do with my childhood. That's it. It was my parents' fault. :-)

    None of the other folks we know who are business owners have designed or built their own websites. They all have outsourced it.

    :-Don
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Ron, I'd have to say your proposition, as you've worded it, is false.

      Some of the business owners I've run across are such control freaks that the idea of giving up control over some aspect of their business makes them really uncomfortable. I happen to fall into that category myself, although I am getting better about it.

      Some of them have someone in the business - spouse, offspring, etc. - to whom they would like to delegate at least the mechanical aspects of online marketing (updating a website, sending email, etc.)

      As others have already mentioned, you also have the business owners who just get into it and the ones who do it because they don't have the cash flow to hire someone.

      Selling DIY marketing products to small business onwers can be extremely lucrative. Do the names Jay Abraham, Jay Conrad Levinson, Dan Kennedy, Joe Polish, Rory Fatt ring any bells?

      Edit:

      Another angle is providing enough knowledge that the business owner or their designee can effectively hire out what needs doing without falling for a line of patter with nothing behind it.
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