Thoughts on EMD's (exact match domains)?

by ED1190
14 replies
Hello, fellow warriors!

So, I've contemplated starting an Amazon Affiliate type website or E-commerce type site in the future, and was wondering if it's better to get an exact match domain, or a potential branding type one?

Reason I ask is because I'm looking at two niches right now with an available exact match domain (the .net extension) that's getting good traffic per month with not a lot of tough competition.

Some people argue that exact match domain may cause a penalty in Google, but isn't that only if you abuse the exact match term?

Please let me know your opinions and thoughts, and thank you!
#domains #emd #exact #match #thoughts
  • Profile picture of the author GlobexWeb
    Exactly .... IF you make it too obvious then I think you get hurt by a penalty.... in google's eye
    But for other search engines like bing and yahoo ... you get a privilage advantage of EMD ... and to quote a figure ... 21% of search traffic came from Bing only .... so its a way between choosing exact match or not ...
    But if you dont make it an obvious EMD then its okay for google too .....
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11055524].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    Banned
    Some people argue that exact match domain may cause a penalty in Google, but isn't that only if you abuse the exact match term?
    If your site is about Blue Widgets For Grandmas, then it's only logical your domain would be bluewidgetsforgrandmas.com.

    Google's search algorithm does not penalize people for doing what is only logical.
    Signature
    Get Off The Warrior Forum Now & Don't Come Back If You Want To Succeed!
    All The Real Marketers Are Gone. There's Nothing Left But Weak, Sniveling Wanna-Bees!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11055529].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author agmccall
      Originally Posted by Brent Stangel View Post


      Google's search algorithm does not penalize people for doing what is only logical.
      Nor do they reward them

      al
      Signature

      Broken promises don't upset me. I just think, why did they believe me?
      ~Jack Handey~

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056348].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AceOfShirts
    I think about this all the time also. I always come to the conclusion that Google will never be my only provider of visitors. I need to make my domains easy for people to understand and remember. I advertise a lot of my websites offline. I consider EMDs perfect for offline advertising. There are 1000's of pens floating around the country with my EMDs printed on the side.

    I think it also makes it easier for people to remember so they can come back to your site later without trying to find it in a Google search. If they have to search because they can't remember your website address they might also find a competitor or cost you money if they click on a PPC campaign you are running.

    Just my opinion,
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11055625].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author quadagon
    Originally Posted by ED1190 View Post

    Some people argue that exact match domain may cause a penalty in Google, but isn't that only if you abuse the exact match term?
    To the best of my knowledge there is no penalty for using an exact match domain but you also don't get any extra love from Google. At least not since 2012.

    I've helped a friend set up in business and he uses emd's without any problem.

    We're not really concerned about the big g but have chosen domain names that match a two fold criteria:

    1). Say exactly what the site does.
    2). Are instantly memorable.

    This combination helps with viral marketing and also with search engines as people are using that term as a longtail and clicking on our site.

    You will often find people talk about emds being punished when they are getting hit for other things.

    Affiliate sites and e-commerce sites often suffer from keyword stuffing and thin content.

    From listening to the Google hangouts it seems that recent updates have targeted thin content.

    I didn't really understand this bit:

    Reason I ask is because I'm looking at two niches right now with an available exact match domain (the .net extension) that's getting good traffic per month with not a lot of tough competition.
    Is the domain expiring/expired or are you looking at a flipped site?

    Either way you'll want to do so e research into the backlinks profile and also how and why traffic is coming to the domain.
    Signature
    I've got 99 problems but a niche ain't one
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11055652].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ED1190
      Originally Posted by quadagon View Post

      Is the domain expiring/expired or are you looking at a flipped site?

      Either way you'll want to do so e research into the backlinks profile and also how and why traffic is coming to the domain.
      Neither. I was doing keyword research of a niche, and I noticed that a keyword that's getting good search results per month has the .net extension available. It's an EMD.

      But you have a good point of checking out the domain backlinks, and see if it was registered and used in the past.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056141].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Originally Posted by ED1190 View Post

    Hello, fellow warriors!

    So, I've contemplated starting an Amazon Affiliate type website or E-commerce type site in the future, and was wondering if it's better to get an exact match domain, or a potential branding type one?

    Reason I ask is because I'm looking at two niches right now with an available exact match domain (the .net extension) that's getting good traffic per month with not a lot of tough competition.

    Some people argue that exact match domain may cause a penalty in Google, but isn't that only if you abuse the exact match term?

    Please let me know your opinions and thoughts, and thank you!
    Imo, they don't cause GOOG to give you a penalty. Maybe I could be wrong.

    Anyway, EMDs are not as an effective as they were when I started 9 years ago.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11055666].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
    OK - so this is an April Fool's day joke. Right?
    Signature

    Sid Hale
    Coming Soon... Rapid Action Profits (Pro)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056101].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CityCowboy
    If I were you, I would go with a ''brand'' type domain name.

    Why brand and not EMD?

    Because your domain name will be more memorable which will result in more direct (free) traffic. , think Twitter, PayPal, eBay, Google. Their name means nothing, but their brand is very powerful.

    Exact match domains are easy to forget, and there is a risk of penalty from Google.

    Hope that helps.
    Signature
    ''I predict Bitcoin at $1 million by 2020, I'll eat my d*** if wrong.'' – John McAfee.
    Join Our FREE Cryptocurrency Instagram Page! >>>
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056129].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056383].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author EelKat
      Originally Posted by tyronne78 View Post

      I would go with your exact match keyword + brand name.
      This is what I do on a page level.

      My url is my brand name, then each page is my keyword

      bandname.com/keyword

      Each keyword, has dozens of relevant similar keywords, resulting in LOTS of pages about 1 topic, which in turn allerts Google to the fact that this site is about one topic, because the topic is all over the site, in headers, page titles, text body, etc, rather then just in the url.

      For example, let's pretend you are a cat groomer in Maine, your business names Sudds. The best url for you would be sudds.com and then make each page keyword named, with pages titled stuff like:

      sudds.com/CatGroomingHoursAndLocation
      sudds.com/HolidaySpecialsOnCatGrooming
      sudds.com/CatGroomingPrices
      sudds.com/GroomingYourCatAtHome
      sudds.com/BestWayToBathYourCat
      sudds.com/RemovingCatHair
      sudds.com/CatBreedersInMaine
      sudds.com/BestShampooForLongHairedCats
      sudds.com/DoSphinxCatsNeedBathing
      sudds.com/ShouldWhiteCatsBeBleached
      sudds.com/CatBoardersInMaine
      sudds.com/HowToBrushYourCatsTeeth
      sudds.com/PainlessNailTrimmingForYouAndYourCat
      sudds.com/CatVetsInMaine
      sudds.com/BestBrushForPersianCats

      The url being named the name of the company, makes it easy for customers to find the URL.

      Every page having a long tail keyword, makes it easy for your customers to search within your site to find the page they are looking for.

      Every page of the site being long tail keywords also tells Google your topic is Cat Grooming In Maine. It helps Google index your site in the proper categories and helps get the correct traffic to you (people who live in Maine and are searching for local cat groomers)

      I used to use the EMDs method years ago, and before Panda of 2012 it worked GREAT; now it just works meeh, okay

      Brand name with long tail keywords works far better nowadays, which is why I switched to it. I switched to in 2013, after Panda went through and made it harder for EMDs to rank on top.

      While there is no evidence that Google punished EMDs, they no longer reward them with traffic boosts the way they did in the 2003 to 2010 era when EMD urls were the way to go
      Signature

      My review of Flamboyant Nipples: The Site That Supports KKK Anti-Gay Terrorist Crimes
      Info on my Novels is HERE. History of Stephen King's Thinner Gypsies is HERE.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056742].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author ED1190
        Originally Posted by EelKat View Post

        This is what I do on a page level.

        My url is my brand name, then each page is my keyword

        bandname.com/keyword

        Each keyword, has dozens of relevant similar keywords, resulting in LOTS of pages about 1 topic, which in turn allerts Google to the fact that this site is about one topic, because the topic is all over the site, in headers, page titles, text body, etc, rather then just in the url.

        For example, let's pretend you are a cat groomer in Maine, your business names Sudds. The best url for you would be sudds.com and then make each page keyword named, with pages titled stuff like:

        sudds.com/CatGroomingHoursAndLocation
        sudds.com/HolidaySpecialsOnCatGrooming
        sudds.com/CatGroomingPrices
        sudds.com/GroomingYourCatAtHome
        sudds.com/BestWayToBathYourCat
        sudds.com/RemovingCatHair
        sudds.com/CatBreedersInMaine
        sudds.com/BestShampooForLongHairedCats
        sudds.com/DoSphinxCatsNeedBathing
        sudds.com/ShouldWhiteCatsBeBleached
        sudds.com/CatBoardersInMaine
        sudds.com/HowToBrushYourCatsTeeth
        sudds.com/PainlessNailTrimmingForYouAndYourCat
        sudds.com/CatVetsInMaine
        sudds.com/BestBrushForPersianCats

        The url being named the name of the company, makes it easy for customers to find the URL.

        Every page having a long tail keyword, makes it easy for your customers to search within your site to find the page they are looking for.

        Every page of the site being long tail keywords also tells Google your topic is Cat Grooming In Maine. It helps Google index your site in the proper categories and helps get the correct traffic to you (people who live in Maine and are searching for local cat groomers)

        I used to use the EMDs method years ago, and before Panda of 2012 it worked GREAT; now it just works meeh, okay

        Brand name with long tail keywords works far better nowadays, which is why I switched to it. I switched to in 2013, after Panda went through and made it harder for EMDs to rank on top.

        While there is no evidence that Google punished EMDs, they no longer reward them with traffic boosts the way they did in the 2003 to 2010 era when EMD urls were the way to go
        Thanks for the advice! Never even considered it from that angle.

        It does seem that Bing and Yahoo still consider EMD's a higher priority, but not Google. But, it doesn't seem that Google will penalize you by any means (unless you do some shady stuff on purpose).
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11056770].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author hynds
        Originally Posted by EelKat View Post

        This is what I do on a page level.

        My url is my brand name, then each page is my keyword

        bandname.com/keyword

        Each keyword, has dozens of relevant similar keywords, resulting in LOTS of pages about 1 topic, which in turn allerts Google to the fact that this site is about one topic, because the topic is all over the site, in headers, page titles, text body, etc, rather then just in the url.

        For example, let's pretend you are a cat groomer in Maine, your business names Sudds. The best url for you would be sudds.com and then make each page keyword named, with pages titled stuff like:

        sudds.com/CatGroomingHoursAndLocation
        sudds.com/HolidaySpecialsOnCatGrooming
        sudds.com/CatGroomingPrices
        sudds.com/GroomingYourCatAtHome
        sudds.com/BestWayToBathYourCat
        sudds.com/RemovingCatHair
        sudds.com/CatBreedersInMaine
        sudds.com/BestShampooForLongHairedCats
        sudds.com/DoSphinxCatsNeedBathing
        sudds.com/ShouldWhiteCatsBeBleached
        sudds.com/CatBoardersInMaine
        sudds.com/HowToBrushYourCatsTeeth
        sudds.com/PainlessNailTrimmingForYouAndYourCat
        sudds.com/CatVetsInMaine
        sudds.com/BestBrushForPersianCats

        The url being named the name of the company, makes it easy for customers to find the URL.

        Every page having a long tail keyword, makes it easy for your customers to search within your site to find the page they are looking for.

        Every page of the site being long tail keywords also tells Google your topic is Cat Grooming In Maine. It helps Google index your site in the proper categories and helps get the correct traffic to you (people who live in Maine and are searching for local cat groomers)

        I used to use the EMDs method years ago, and before Panda of 2012 it worked GREAT; now it just works meeh, okay

        Brand name with long tail keywords works far better nowadays, which is why I switched to it. I switched to in 2013, after Panda went through and made it harder for EMDs to rank on top.

        While there is no evidence that Google punished EMDs, they no longer reward them with traffic boosts the way they did in the 2003 to 2010 era when EMD urls were the way to go
        Why don't you place a dash between words such as Cat-Grooming-Hours-And-Location,..etc. I think this will makes your URLs more friendly with end users, not just for GG. And the meaning also don't change.
        Signature

        â–º Godaddy Coupon - Just $1/mo Hosting, $0.99 .COM Domain Registration
        â–º Jeulia Coupon Promotion - Save Up to 70% on Rings Clearance

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11057383].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author brettb
    One of my best sites is a two word EMD domain. It died in 2012 after the Panda/Penguin updates. In 2014 I wrote half a dozen non-keyword targeted articles and removed the trash articles and it came back to life!

    These days though I tend to prefer starting a brand using Buzzfeed type catchy and memorable domains.
    Signature
    ÖŽ Get a FREE dofollow backlink in the SEO niche ÖŽ




    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11057411].message }}

Trending Topics