What's the best digital marketing certificate out there?

11 replies
I want to be an internet marketing specialist. You know like for social media and SEO.
I am not talking about those who you have to complete a whole program just to earn a cert. I am talking about those pass or fail cert.
#certificate #digital #marketing
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    You are going to get a lot of people who will tell you that you don't really need a certificate to be a digital marketing specialist. Which is technically true. As far as I know, there is no legal requirement for a certificate or degree to sell Internet marketing services.

    And if you are fishing for clients who already understand what you are doing and how to evaluate your expertise, you'll find that your track record is more important than a credential.

    But when you venture further afield, dealing with clients who don't have that experience, having something to point to that says someone else vouches for your knowledge can be the difference between "we'll let you know" and "when can you get started."

    The two I'm familiar with, and that seem to be fairly well respected, are Digital Marketer and AWAI. Both have training programs, and you can check them out by reviewing an abundance of free content.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Just a little bit of caution is in order, IMO.

    I have seen a number of paid training programs that offer a certificate for completion of a marketing course. The certificate might be called a diploma, a credential, a degree, a competency, or any other number of other things.

    The problem I see is the fact that I don't know of any organization or body that monitors, certifies or even evaluates the content of the course, the student's level of marketing knowledge when the course is completed, or any other kind of proficiency testing or rating.

    IMO, having a certificate may look good on one's resume, but I have not seen an employer or client hiring someone based on them having a "certificate."

    I'm certainly not criticizing or "knocking" any training program or individual who wants to learn about marketing. I'm just suggesting here that your ambition to have a certificate in digital marketing may be a self-satisfying desire ... but is there really any practical use for it? Does anyone really care? Not so much.

    Good luck in your marketing career,

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      The problem I see is the fact that I don't know of any organization or body that monitors, certifies or even evaluates the content of the course, the student's level of marketing knowledge when the course is completed, or any other kind of proficiency testing or rating.

      Steve
      Steve's right. There is no accrediting body for these courses.

      The only thing you can go on is a program's reputation among the people/companies that hire service providers in your market.

      He's also right about companies hiring solely based on possessing the certificate. But if it comes down to two similar candidates, and one has a respected certification, it could be enough to tip the balance.

      Before you plunk down your money and invest your time in a course, do you due diligence. Maybe ask some people who might become prospects if they value a certification, and if so, whose.
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  • Profile picture of the author productivitypro
    I know this might sound cheesy, but the Google ad words analytics certification are usually enough to convince a client that you know your stuff. The exams are online and free to take.

    Just use your Internet marketing experience to get results for your clients but use the Google credentials for support
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Originally Posted by productivitypro View Post

      I know this might sound cheesy

      Yes it does. The OP said he wanted to be an "internet marketing specialist" and that covers a whole lot of things beyond Adwords analytics.

      If you feel that you need something to "prove" your claim to knowing what you're doing or you want to satisfy your desire for a "title" then by all means get certified.

      To me, and most likely a lot of other small business owners, the proof is in the pudding. Show me that you've been consistently profitable online - that's the best credential I can think of.

      The best to all of you,

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

        To me, and most likely a lot of other small business owners, the proof is in the pudding. Show me that you've been consistently profitable online - that's the best credential I can think of.

        The best to all of you,

        Steve
        Steve, that works for people that already have a track record. For people still building that record, having a recognized credential can be the difference between getting a chance to prove yourself and not getting the chance.

        One hiring manager I talked to back when I was hunting for a job told me that a diploma can get you that first job or two. After that, no one cares where you went to school. (Some companies still make a degree in something a job requirement).

        If the OP is going out on his own, the same basic logic applies - having the cert might help him get started, but then it's the ability to get results that counts.
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  • Profile picture of the author productivitypro
    I know but some small business people do ask where you got your training. It's easier to say I took a course with Google. The conversation usually becomes more positive and in my favor because many of them are familiar with Google.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mary Pienzi
      I would tell you to take a google course. pass it of course if their is a test. then you can tell your potential clients that you have taken the google course and just talk your way in. Once you provide them with useful information that they did not know before that should placate them. Seriously they are just looking to see if you have the knowledge they are seeking.
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  • Profile picture of the author kushmanmediallc
    I just took a mini MBA Program at Rutgers University, which is like an associates master/mba and it was cheap, and well worth it as bridge between a traditional way of saying I know what I'm talking about and also learning from mentors in the industry. Your going to forever be self learning but if you need a cred booster that gets people's attention and never goes away this is a great option.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    The best certificate? You get it from Experience University.

    Cheers,

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    I seen a dude run solo ads. Lots of raving reviews. I wanted to learn more about the guy and his list, and to see where i can sign up to it.... then i found his website! And his website was 1 page long. All he had was his resume' on his page, and no other real life marketing stuff. So why would someone decide to buy from him? I dont know, maybe because like John said: companies who are new and have no idea about internet marketing. Long story short, 5 months later the guy stopped selling solos altogether. Website doesn't exist anymore.

    So me a vet, i'm assuming the guy just bought a mailing list, sells solos on marketplaces, and puts up a domain of himself just to have people know that he exists in the "marketing field".

    You dont need a cert to land clients. Trust me. Test yourself. Try and sell a $7 ebook first to folks in the internet marketing community, and see how that turns out. If you can't do it, how will you sell $1,000+ consulting services to companies that are "hip to the game" and know what to look for?
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