I may need a marketing expert at this point

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Hi guys,

It took me a while to develop a website product, with my own time and resources. Which is ready now and there have been some interest from the few who saw it. But I may waste my time doing the marketing and SEO all by myself...

I know it all depends on the product itself, but is it generally realistic to set as goal and expect seeing some steady growing revenue within the first three month? I'll treasure any constructive advice on the alternatives: partnership, limited investment or advertising, things that I could try with potential high ROI in a short time etc.

Thanks a lot,
Cristian
#expert #marketing #point
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Yeah, you've picked up on the issue. Conversion tools (ie. your website and the sales copy on it) are only useful if enough eyeballs see them.

    It doesn't depend on the product, though. Many lousy products sell well because of the distribution channel they're hooked up to, and other factors such as celebrity endorsement.

    Build backwards. Start with the money you want to make every month. And your sale price? Divide your total money target by that per-sale amount. Now you know how many sales you need to make.

    To get those sales, you are going to need a certain # of qualified prospects.

    What do you think is reasonable as a conversion target? Remember, these are qualified prospects, not cold traffic, so 2% is really bad here. Let's say 10% as you start? That's not good, either, but it's a conservative starting point.

    So you want to make $1000; your product is $100. 1000 / 100 = 10 sales needed.

    10% conversion of qualified leads = 100 required.

    And to get 100 qualified leads, you're likely to have to have a traffic source that brings you 1000 unqualified leads (cold traffic) over the month--conservatively, again, estimating that only 1 in 10 visitors is a good fit with your offer.

    Better traffic sources = higher quality and better conversion.

    Unqualified Leads >> Qualified Leads >> Sales.

    This is the money equation and by working backwards from your money target you see what your activity level needs to be. If you're not getting 1000 / 30 = around 34, 35 leads per day coming into your funnel, you don't have a chance of making your money target, do you.

    Common mistakes from the hundreds of coaching calls I've done over the years:

    1. No money target. Vague at best; can't work back to activity level from that. "I'll try to make 'as much money as I can'," and makes nothing.

    2. Insufficient traffic. "My Facebook ads guy will figure it out"; "I'll find the traffic." No pre-qualified traffic source set up? Lousy funnel. Scrambling, little to no chance of success.

    Yet how many "marketers" do these two things? Hardly any. Most are fake it 'til you make it, no plan dreamers.

    And then they wonder why they can't connect with serious affiliate marketers and product creators...who speak the language I just shared.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      And then they wonder why they can't connect with serious affiliate marketers and product creators...who speak the language I just shared.
      Love the language of business math.

      Keep it up, you smooth talkin' devil, you...
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        Love the language of business math.

        Keep it up, you smooth talkin' devil, you...
        That activity level can steer you towards the right affiliate partnerships and lead sources, too. Someone's list may be terrible or it may be great in terms of fit with your offer. Now you have targets to rate by, achievable targets, that will help you choose what is best. You want to propose a partnership? Now you can run a quick test with a sample from their list and find out how good or bad it is. Again, things most marketers with the "I'll try to make as much money as I can" mentality never think to do.

        After you have run some live traffic you can measure Planned versus Actual results and see whether you need to zero in first on your Traffic or Conversion side of the equation to make improvements...and get the biggest bang for your buck.
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    • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
      Thanks, Jason, that's pretty good stuff...

      Problem is I'm already more of less familiar with most of this, I did enough SEO, but long time ago. I'll have to catch up a lot, for instance, on social media and many new techniques.

      It's exactly on backlinks, guest posting and other traditional "build your DA" stuff where I wasted my time for the past two weeks. It goes very slowly and it is possible if I pay someone a few hundreds or more, he will be more efficient. But I want to make sure this will be indeed a good investment.

      I would focus on building steady healthy traffic for the first two-three months. I know what you say about the sales, and I agree, but let's focus on traffic first. I'm still looking at what the target should be.

      Would I be delusional to look for let's say a few thousands unique visitors a day? That I could try to double/triple in the other next three months?
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

        Thanks, Jason, that's pretty good stuff...

        Problem is I'm already more of less familiar with most of this, I did enough SEO, but long time ago. I'll have to catch up a lot, for instance, on social media and many new techniques.

        It's exactly on backlinks, guest posting and other traditional "build your DA" stuff where I wasted my time for the past two weeks. It goes very slowly and it is possible if I pay someone a few hundreds or more, he will be more efficient. But I want to make sure this will be indeed a good investment.

        I would focus on building steady healthy traffic for the first two-three months. I know what you say about the sales, and I agree, but let's focus on traffic first. I'm still looking at what the target should be.

        Would I be delusional to look for let's say a few thousands unique visitors a day? That I could try to double/triple in the other next three months?
        If that's your target, then you know what you need to be looking for or building to.

        Are you going to get 1000 visitors a day from organic traffic alone? I'd say not. So that shows you the direction should be partnerships, affiliate traffic, paid traffic.

        I would figure out your cost of customer acquisition and lifetime value (both estimated at this point) and see how much you can invest in getting a buyer.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bryan Zazz
      Jason, your posts here are so good I should print them on my forehead. It's always good to be reminded the simple basics of what we do, while we are distracted by the latest tech stuff and other shiny objects. While tech and shinies come and go, the basics are here to stay for the long run and never leave. (... and never leave us alone if we forget them)

      Big thanks for those refreshers ...

      PS - Keep them coming


      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Yeah, you've picked up on the issue. Conversion tools (ie. your website and the sales copy on it) are only useful if enough eyeballs see them.
      ...
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  • Profile picture of the author nickyz1
    it would be best if you use some growth hacking Tactics if you don't want to spend a lot on advertising
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    I'd not set 3 month goals Cristian only because it sets expectations, which muck up the whole process.

    Be patient. Follow your passion. Actually, make it almost all about your passion because doing so focuses you on learning marketing, creating helpful content, and patiently practicing your marketing skills, so you let go the time frame outcomes and do the requisite giving to help you building a thriving, sustainable business over years, not months.

    Ryan
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    • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
      Sorry, Ryan, but that's a full time job, not a hobby

      I worked as 30+ years as a software engineer, not sure I want to change this. Marketing is something I could eventually let someone else do, we'll see...
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve B
        Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

        Sorry, Ryan, but that's a full time job, not a hobby

        Sometimes when you're just learning the ropes of Internet marketing, it pays to work as though it were a full time job. You can cut back on your hours working after you have a profitable selling system in place - that will happen naturally unless, of course, you desire to take your business into overdrive and ramp things up significantly.

        ". . . steady growing revenue within the first three months" is certainly a possibility, depending upon what you do from this point forward, and depending upon how the market receives your product. Word (and reviews) will spread quickly if your buyers feel like your product is a dud.

        But assuming it's a great product and assuming there is healthy market demand (which you should have researched prior to creating your product), I personally would suggest you put every effort you can into launching your product and begin watching your stats.

        If you have already been at this for a long time ("I did enough SEO, but long time ago") and you're still not sure what you're doing (gathered from what you've mentioned in this thread) then I would say you need to focus all your effort in getting some initial sales and getting set up so that you can build a subscriber list. Working hard at first will lay the type of business foundation from which you can launch all kinds of products. Without a list, you'll always be chasing the coldest prospects.

        The very best to you,

        Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author Bryan Zazz
        That's why the "real money" is in marketing, not in coding or product creation.

        Lousy product + Great marketing
        beats
        Great product + Lousy marketing
        Every Time !!!

        Unfortunately ... because my product skills outshine my marketing skills. But luckily new skills can be learned...

        Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

        Sorry, Ryan, but that's a full time job, not a hobby

        I worked as 30+ years as a software engineer, not sure I want to change this. Marketing is something I could eventually let someone else do, we'll see...
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        • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
          Maybe today. In the 90s however, it was all high tech. I would not have changed my coding skills for anything else
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          • Profile picture of the author Bryan Zazz
            You mean the 90s browser wars and how Microsoft came to dominate the PC world, then shifted to the Internet ... which they initially missed?

            But that example actually proves Jason's point: MS was so-so in coding, but excellent marketers. They came to dominate the 90s precisely because of their marketing - and their 2 cash cows of then - WindowsOS and Office suite - allowed them to make product mistakes, then recover, and finally dominate. It's the margins from those 2 cash cows which made MS the gorilla of the 90s.

            They came with inferior products but superior marketing, and dominated the 90s tech. That's the power of mktg. ... and of high margins

            Besides, that does not matter now, as today is 2017, not the 90s. Welcome to the new world of today ... what can we do today to make a buck ?

            Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

            Maybe today. In the 90s however, it was all high tech. I would not have changed my coding skills for anything else
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          • Profile picture of the author anay
            Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

            Maybe today. In the 90s however, it was all high tech. I would not have changed my coding skills for anything else
            You have gotten it wrong, it was all marketing not tech, you can find great coders all the time not great marketers. Obviously, tech is the basis of any product creations, but you got to learn marketing as much seriously as tech in order to build a sustainable biz. I'm a techie by profession.
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  • Profile picture of the author anaybose
    Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

    Hi guys,

    It took me a while to develop a website product, with my own time and resources. Which is ready now and there have been some interest from the few who saw it. But I may waste my time doing the marketing and SEO all by myself...

    I know it all depends on the product itself, but is it generally realistic to set as goal and expect seeing some steady growing revenue within the first three month? I'll treasure any constructive advice on the alternatives: partnership, limited investment or advertising, things that I could try with potential high ROI in a short time etc.

    Thanks a lot,
    Cristian
    Hello Cristian, you're a professional who need absolute professional and sound advice. It looks like you have built a great product. Most folks in WF are pure amateurs. If you're looking for a solid marketing plan for your new business, try to visit Entrepreneur.com and read some articles from industry veterans and contact them. They'll charge for their services, but they will guide you in the right direction. I will caution against seeking free info from an open public forum.
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  • Profile picture of the author NilbogKing
    I think one thing that makes people successful is sticking to what you are good at. If you are great at generating a product then keep doing that and find a solution for your weakness (in this case online marketing). I would spend time finding someone who is a killer marketer and link up with them for a large percentage of your product. After all, no matter how great your product is if you can't find a channel to sell it then you will make exactly $0.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

    Hi guys,

    I know it all depends on the product itself, but is it generally realistic to set as goal and expect seeing some steady growing revenue within the first three month?

    Thanks a lot,
    Cristian
    With Pay per click.. Its extremely realistic to not only expect, but to HAVE steady growth in 3 months... let alone 3 weeks.

    You have a product.. you want to sell it. Simple and straight forward. In my world.. you are a business owner. Being a business owner you understand that there is expenses in doing business. Sounds to me like you are a 1 man show... So your business expenses are rather low ( your time - which does have value by the way )

    EVEN if you had a $10.00 product and your cost per sale ended up averaging $3.00 your overall expense is only 30%. In the realm of " Business " that is well within the confines of real low over head expense. Throw in the fact that " Advertising " is 100% deductible at the end of the year.. your accountant will love you!

    In Terms of SEO... Just by some of the things you have said:
    Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

    It's exactly on backlinks, guest posting and other traditional "build your DA" stuff where I wasted my time for the past two weeks.
    as an example... 3 months will be a push for you.. 6 months may be a push... As I am sure you are aware of there are a " few " variables at play in figuring that out.

    Not that social media will be a bust for you.. but the reality is you are not going to strike it rich next week with a new facebook page, let alone one that has been worked on diligently for the past year. The same goes with the other social media outlets. I can suggest you set up a twitter acct for most direct communication with your end users in terms answering questions etc. I find for myself and many that I talk to that support is an activity that can quickly turn unsatisfied users into referring users.

    I think as Jason has stated you want to set goals to understand the needs in traffic you will need to obtain those goals. I would also take that a step further. In terms of online marketing there is this closed vacuum ideology that says advertise and get customers. Granted, yes that is the way things work... but there is another side of marketing that is often missed or bypassed in the get the dollar now mentality.

    When you look at an aspect of marketing such as " Growth Hacking " many say oh.. that's just viral marketing, but for me its a bit more. Its understanding what it takes to get those that are happy with your product or service to refer.. and to turn those that maybe not so happy, into happy referring customers. To get a better understanding of the concept try looking at this post: https://www.warriorforum.com/growth-...tes-aarrr.html

    May help you set a foundation for growth beyond the standard online mentality sales practices.

    Hope that Helps!
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    Success is an ACT not an idea
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    • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
      Thanks, but my product could actually be as low as $5 (I'll try to capitalize on low cost + high volume), so pay per click is actually a very bad idea.

      And the whole point was that I may not have time to do all this SEO efficiently and by myself. I was not asking on HOW to do it, the net is full of such generous advice.

      But thanks anyway,
      Cristian
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

        Thanks, but my product could actually be as low as $5 (I'll try to capitalize on low cost + high volume), so pay per click is actually a very bad idea.

        And the whole point was that I may not have time to do all this SEO efficiently and by myself. I was not asking on HOW to do it, the net is full of such generous advice.

        But thanks anyway,
        Cristian
        So basically what you are saying is you really don't need marketing advice... you need the green light from others to hire out your SEO efforts?

        Again.. you are basically starting a business.. lets throw out an example here.. do you know what the standard operating costs of a big chain restaurant is? were you aware they run in the 60% category? So even at $3.00 cost per sale on a $5.00 item that throws you with in the realm of not great but still turning a profit operating expense.

        One marketer to another.. as it stands right now, you do not have a proven flow of traffic. Your idea is to turn and burn at low cost to the consumer... sell for less but sell more. You do understand that the same amount of effort is put into place at selling your product for $5.00 as it is $10.00 let alone $79.00.

        I suggest you use the search function of the WF and read up on pricing strategies. I can only imagine that Mr. Kanigan might step in with a word or 2 on the subject.

        I am going to be very blunt here.. You have already set the seeds of failure in motion with this. You are asking for marketing advice, which I gave. but what you really want is to pawn off the SEO efforts ( because you are filled with self doubt in your ability to actually develop a decent flow of traffic ) so you can blame it on them when you aren't selling the numbers you want.

        I will assume you have no standing proven formulation for success in such an endeavor ( selling digital information online ) I will assume that you have yet to test any of your sales funnel to ensure it is optimized to actually perform. ( as in make sales ) I will assume that beyond the idea of selling this 1 product, you have not looked beyond this effort in terms of what to do with your client base once they have bought. So my suggesting the video that discusses AARRR is pretty on point.

        You are starting / running a business and because you created the product, you are so invested in its success you are blind to all of the indicators of failure you are throwing out Take a moment step back.. re read what Jason posted about goals and expectations and requirements to obtain those goals. Forget the product itself... do you have in place what it will take to get you there?

        The answer to that question is no... You have a dream.. you have created a product... and with that, its needs to be making money in 3 months. ok you don't have the time to exert the effort needed to create SEO traffic.. so push the time line to 6 months to a year. Make it reasonable. Rome was not built in a day - let alone a year. The only one applying pressure here is YOU - to yourself no less ( I hate it when I do this to myself )

        Focus on building your baby.. take your time.. do it right, and reap the benefits from it later!
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        • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
          Fiverr has $5 gigs. And they actually make just $1 for each sell.

          ...But never mind, I find your tone not very constructive and I suggest let's stop here, no need to be rude.

          Yes, my question was not at all how to do SEO by myself, but I'll not take abuse if some people don't read it.

          Peace and love, man. Move on.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

        Thanks, but my product could actually be as low as $5 (I'll try to capitalize on low cost + high volume), so pay per click is actually a very bad idea.

        And the whole point was that I may not have time to do all this SEO efficiently and by myself. I was not asking on HOW to do it, the net is full of such generous advice.

        But thanks anyway,
        Cristian
        AAAAAAA! Please let me head off this problem with you before you experience it.

        1. The idea that "lower price leads to higher sales" is a fallacy. I'll explain more in a sec.

        2. Low price = low margins = low ability to pay for traffic (remember what I was saying above about understanding your cost of customer acquisition?). And that's bad.


        OK, let's start with the low price thing. Walmart and McDonald's can do it because they've a) created a distribution channel to push that much product out there; b) their empires, particularly McD's, are also about real estate--something the average person doesn't know about--and they are making money investing in the properties of the distribution locations, too; and c) they and their cousins have made some big mistakes on thinking they could just go to the lowest price and that would bring in customers in droves.

        I was trained as an operations management & process improvement guy, and with that skill set I have seen organizations on their way to selling themselves into bankruptcy. Restaurants with owners who don't understand food costing do this all the time: each plate served costs more to bring it to the guest than it brings in revenue. Please do not think that just because your business is "online" and has fewer fixed costs that you are exempt from this possibility. ;-)

        Now to concept #2: Price Elasticity. I have tested this concept myself over many years and can tell you if a person will buy a product at $7 they will buy it at $11. If they'll buy it at $37, they'll buy it at $57 without a blink and at $87...but probably not $97. Look at the margin differences.

        That margin gap is what pays your profit...gives you more and better quality traffic...improves the product, the sales page, the design as you can invest more.

        Additionally, a low price will be a turnoff to buyers who look for quality and value. If I offered you a BMW car for $750, what would you ask about it? Something must be wrong. It can't be very good.

        Again drawing from my own experience, I could not sell a program at $97. I couldn't sell it at $197. But at $297, it took off and sold for years until I closed the offer. Why? Because it passed some magical point where people believed it had to be good because the price was high enough.

        A lower price does not mean more customers.

        What I'm trying to share with you here, and I'm not alone, are ideas about your business model. You've heard of the 80/20 Rule? This is one of those few decisions that impacts the majority of what you experience.

        I have friends who wouldn't buy my sales training program because it doesn't cost $80,000. That's not a typo. In their minds, $80K is the point where something must be good. I should raise my prices lol. What you believe is a high price is still low ticket to someone else. The perception of quality and value is more important. Also, do you want halfhearted toe-testing buyers who don't even take the thing out of the wrapper, then demand a refund a week later because they went on a shopping spree and overspent? (Happens frequently here.)

        You're a software engineer. Use that engineering mindset. Design your business model. Figure out how much profit you want to make...not "as much money as I can" because that's a fool's errand and how so many people stay dirt poor...understand how much room you need in margin to pay for your hard costs and advertising...that tells you your cost of customer acquisition...and set your price first that way. Then go build a product that matches that price point.

        And please, please, PLEASE...put something for sale on the back end of the funnel. Have an upsell. So many people miss this. You invested in getting that buyer. They've proven they'll buy. And the easiest customer to get is one who just bought from you. Use the laddering concept and give these buyers more goodness to get from you. Then you'll make some money.
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        • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
          To prove you wrong, Jason, I just bought (not kidding) one of your low price Amazon Kindle ebooks

          Of course I know what you said. I have another product I sell for $200 and one customer paid $600 once (for three licenses), when I told him he needs just one but he didn't want me to reimburse him.

          Where we disagree is there is also the other low price model/mentality, and it works not just for McDonald's. I've spent myself on Fiverr over $100 lately on small $5 gigs just because they were "only" $5! I've seen myself at some point reluctant to pay for more expensive gigs just because of this "buy Made in China cause it is sooo cheap" mentality!

          I like what you said, it's very valuable from the sales perspective, and I'll also answer on your private email, maybe we'll stay in touch. Only one piece of advice, if I may: stay always constructive and do not be so quick to reject the alternatives. It makes me sad when I hear "you have to buy only the vacuum cleaner A, all others are crap", because that's not 100% valuable advice, it's a salesman's attitude. At the end, I don't care how many great points you bring to prove vacuum A is great, it is the other statement (the rejection) that sticks in my head

          All the best,
          Cristian
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          • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
            Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

            To prove you wrong, Jason, I just bought (not kidding) one of your low price Amazon Kindle ebooks

            Of course I know what you said. I have another product I sell for $200 and one customer paid $600 once (for three licenses), when I told him he needs just one but he didn't want me to reimburse him.

            Where we disagree is there is also the other low price model/mentality, and it works not just for McDonald's. I've spent myself on Fiverr over $100 lately on small $5 gigs just because they were "only" $5! I've seen myself at some point reluctant to pay for more expensive gigs just because of this "buy Made in China cause it is sooo cheap" mentality!

            I like what you said, it's very valuable from the sales perspective, and I'll also answer on your private email, maybe we'll stay in touch. Only one piece of advice, if I may: stay always constructive and do not be so quick to reject the alternatives. It makes me sad when I hear "you have to buy only the vacuum cleaner A, all others are crap", because that's not 100% valuable advice, it's a salesman's attitude. At the end, I don't care how many great points you bring to prove vacuum A is great, it is the other statement (the rejection) that sticks in my head

            All the best,
            Cristian
            Well you've put in some ideas I did not say.

            My Kindle books, interestingly enough, were priced lower when I first issued them. They are tripwire products, designed to enter the conversation going on in my buyer's head...not moneymakers. A friend pointed out that I should raise the prices to be in line with market leaders a couple years back. Value perception strikes again. It's not what I think...it's what the target market believes.

            Something else interesting to point out is that I wrote a book I never published. The information in there should not be released for $7 or $17 or whatever. It's worth more than the format can bear. I reserve it for coaching programs.

            In my opinion, and you are welcome to your own, "I bought because they were cheap!" is not the reason I want customers to buy. I am not serving at the best, highest level in that situation.

            People's perception of value differs from individual to individual. What one person thinks is "expensive" is "cheap" to someone else. This is called Money Tolerance. It's a limiting belief we all have but at different levels. The error is assuming everyone else shares the same beliefs as our own.

            Again, I have written extensively about this topic and one of my recent posts on another platform was "Should I have a low-priced version of my program?" My answer is that's OK, as long as you rebrand it for that market segment.

            When you make four or six or ten times as much revenue from one customer as you did in the past, you can afford to do a lot more for them.

            I have seen many marketers drown because they did not deliberately build enough margin into their business to pay for the cost of customer acquisition and fulfillment. They were blindly trying to "make as much money as possible." I have tried to point out how a business owner's own money tolerance limits their performance (mine, too) and that a conscious, deliberate choice here can make a big difference.
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        • Profile picture of the author Bryan Zazz
          Jason: you just convinced me to DOUBLE the price of my just-released WSO.
          Good call!

          (maybe I should hire you or something ... haha)


          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          ...
          Now to concept #2: Price Elasticity. I have tested this concept myself over many years and can tell you if a person will buy a product at $7 they will buy it at $11. If they'll buy it at $37, they'll buy it at $57 without a blink and at $87...but probably not $97. Look at the margin differences.

          That margin gap is what pays your profit...gives you more and better quality traffic...improves the product, the sales page, the design as you can invest more.

          Additionally, a low price will be a turnoff to buyers who look for quality and value. If I offered you a BMW car for $750, what would you ask about it? Something must be wrong. It can't be very good.
          ...
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  • Profile picture of the author abbaskapasi
    Go with paid campaigns using Adwords.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

    It took me a while to develop a website product, with my own time and resources. Which is ready now and there have been some interest from the few who saw it. But I may waste my time doing the marketing and SEO all by myself...
    You may have wasted your time by doing your marketing backwards. Never start with the product, always start with the niche first. This will help you to not become "product obsessed" or "in love" with your product - which can cause you to dump alot of money into something that will never make you successful.

    Originally Posted by Cristi S View Post

    I know it all depends on the product itself, but is it generally realistic to set as goal and expect seeing some steady growing revenue within the first three month?
    It never depends on the product itself. All that matters is the starving crowd. You seem confused about your marketing and profit potential. Why?
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    • Profile picture of the author Cristi S
      1) Twitter and even Facebook (and many others) spent years developing their product and base first, without a clear concept on how to monetize them yet.

      2) It depends on the product as well. Some of you may get confused by websites that make a lot of money just from advertising and high traffic. But there is no "product" there the user pays for, it is a different business model.

      3) "You seem confused about your marketing and profit potential. Why?" Because I'm not, like you, a "Marketing Consultant"

      It's not "confusion", it's asking myself when my pipe brakes, should I call a plumber or try fixing it myself...
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