Lead Magnet: Simple vs Artistic?

by Runway
16 replies
Good Afternoon Warriors..

I am on the verge of starting my journey as an internet marketer. After countless hours of research. I found a question in which I cannot seem to find a answer. To my knowledge around the 2010 era? Simple landing pages converted up to 8x more than the flashy ones. Now in 2017 I have noticed landing pages are the opposite with tons of colors and beautiful landscapes for backgrounds..

To further my research I opted-in a few lead magnet funnels in my niche. 5 out of the 6, their "Lead Magnet" (ebook/report) had accented art designs on every page behind the text. Is this an industry standard now? is this something that i should be doing? could it really boost conversions?

Off the top of my head, it may seem like a good idea. After I think on it though.. I feel like if I made my ebook/report look really flashy it could distract "my prospect" from the eye opening content inside! Your Thoughts?

~Andrew
#free report #lead generation #lead magnet #leads #marketing
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  • Profile picture of the author BradKasten
    You didn't mention what niche you're going to be marketing to. Unless you are going into a very artistic heavy niche I would tend to keep things on the clean and simple side. Make your content the star of the show.

    Remember, just because the lead magnets you looked at had a lot of artwork doesn't mean they're converting well.

    I hope that helps.
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    • Profile picture of the author Runway
      Originally Posted by BradKasten View Post

      You didn't mention what niche you're going to be marketing to. Unless you are going into a very artistic heavy niche I would tend to keep things on the clean and simple side. Make your content the star of the show.

      Remember, just because the lead magnets you looked at had a lot of artwork doesn't mean they're converting well.

      I hope that helps.
      I am in the self help niche. I'm sorry i did mean to put that in there
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Mayers
    Hey Runway

    Great post - I agree with BradKasten on just keeping things clean, simple and to the point.

    As a copywriter for the past 7 years, I would highly recommend you to focus more on the text than flashy backgrounds, video backgrounds and all that other stuff.

    What is being said on a landing page is most important - it MUST be truthful and believable to whoever finds their way to your page.

    No distractions - Just a simple, clean page with a headline that is enticing enough to capture emails ( which is the main function of landing pages ) and that's all you need.

    Hope this helps!

    Feel free to PM and connect with me on Facebook @ Joshua Nazir Yahshua Mayers if you'd like me to elaborate.

    -Joshua
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  • Listen, if I have already signed up and gave you my email address in exchange for an eBook, the ONLY thing I want is good, solid information I can put to use in my business.

    You can give a pig a makeover and call it a pony, but it's still a bloody pig.

    Design can help with perception, but underneath the window dressing there must be something of substance.
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  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Don't be guilty of the "all sizzle no steak" mantra. I agree with Brad and some of the others...simplicity is the best way to go.
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    It certainly can't hurt to have some artwork, but I wouldn't worry about using a background behind the text. What matters is the content and it is quickly and easily consumed. A background may be distracting.
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  • Profile picture of the author Runway
    The info you've shared guys.. is amazing! and str8 to the point.. i luv it!

    That's what I was thinking as well. Make it, simple for the customer and the navigation process seamless.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by Runway View Post

    . . . around the 2010 era? Simple landing pages converted up to 8x more than the flashy ones. Now in 2017 I have noticed landing pages are the opposite with tons of colors and beautiful landscapes for backgrounds..

    Runway,

    Marketers are adding "eye candy" because they can. Years ago graphics were not as prevalent as they are today and it was more of a "chore" to include them. Today, a lot of marketers are using PLR as lead magnets and "freebies." A good portion of today's PLR includes graphics so you notice it more often than in years past. It is also easier and cheaper to license graphics today than it used to be - so more background images.

    You mentioned you were putting together "simple landing pages" and I assume you really mean "squeeze pages" - there is a difference. A landing page is any page that is the destination of one of your links. You could have hundreds of landing pages, all within your web site.

    So if you are asking about the design of a squeeze page, here's my suggestion. Make it simple, intuitive, with lots of "white space" and with only one option for the visitor: click on the link to receive the "goodie" in exchange for the contact's information . . . or . . . click away from the page. You don't want any other choices. You're qualifying prospects to find out who wants to be a part of your audience.

    I would suggest that the squeeze page have a compelling headline, a list of benefits of the freebie, a strong call to action, and a button to click with text. If you want to add a graphic (like a cover for your freebie report or a person enjoying the service you provide, etc) keep it relevant.

    It's best if you can keep the whole page "above the fold" so the prospect can see everything without having to scroll.

    There is still room for "style" and "cool" but, as others have said, they are not the main attraction - they should just enhance and professionalize your offer.

    Good luck to you,

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Originally Posted by Runway View Post

    After I think on it though.. I feel like if I made my ebook/report look really flashy it could distract "my prospect" from the eye opening content inside! Your Thoughts?
    Just sell the damn thing.
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    • Profile picture of the author baronet
      Loving all the excellent replies to the OP.

      I like to have my squeeze pages ask a question that elicits a big "Yes" and a box for name and email.

      Simples!
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      • Profile picture of the author Randy McLean
        The appearance of your lead magnet is secondary. Most people won't see it until after they opt in.

        Then you wow them with your content.

        Curiosity is a huge factor with squeeze pages. Sometimes I explain what I am giving away but not the format.

        "2 Step Blueprint" for example.

        The times I have included ecovers my opt in rate lowered. I think most people have seen ecovers and reports a million times.

        And to be honest, I'm not going to read a 60 page report.

        I just keep it simple and focus on the content.
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    At the end of the day, split testing will tell you what converts best for your niche, audience and offer. Ugly can still work well
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  • Profile picture of the author FreedomBlogger
    Originally Posted by Runway View Post

    Good Afternoon Warriors..

    I am on the verge of starting my journey as an internet marketer. After countless hours of research. I found a question in which I cannot seem to find a answer. To my knowledge around the 2010 era? Simple landing pages converted up to 8x more than the flashy ones. Now in 2017 I have noticed landing pages are the opposite with tons of colors and beautiful landscapes for backgrounds..

    To further my research I opted-in a few lead magnet funnels in my niche. 5 out of the 6, their "Lead Magnet" (ebook/report) had accented art designs on every page behind the text. Is this an industry standard now? is this something that i should be doing? could it really boost conversions?

    Off the top of my head, it may seem like a good idea. After I think on it though.. I feel like if I made my ebook/report look really flashy it could distract "my prospect" from the eye opening content inside! Your Thoughts?

    ~Andrew
    Simplicity will always do better online. Now, this doesn't mean you can't be artistic. You can create a simple landing page with beautiful artistic qualities.

    But, the bottom line is that you will never know until you actually test things out. It also depends on your niche.

    Testing, tracking, and tweaking is the best way for you to really get the best answers to all of your questions.
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  • Profile picture of the author SugarPickle
    There is only information and value. No one is going to a product or service to look for "art".


    The basic function of design and color is to grab attention SO THAT you can then turn that attention to the offer. However, people carry it way to far and use visuals that detract from the offer.

    No one lands on your page with the objective of finding something pretty. they are looking for information and its that information that is important.
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  • Profile picture of the author IGotMine
    No one is going to a product or service to look for "art".
    As someone who promotes "art" I would beg to differ. One of my squeeze pages has several pieces of "art" on a slider. Tests have shown the particular pieces featured has an effect on opt-in rate.

    #1 It depends on the market.

    #2 Colors have a very definite affect on peoples' state of mind.

    If you have a major theme color, you should definetly test other colors.

    I've found shades of Blue to work best for MMO niches.

    You should test every variable of your squeeze page, one at a time.
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    • Profile picture of the author SugarPickle
      Originally Posted by IGotMine View Post

      As someone who promotes "art" I would beg to differ. One of my squeeze pages has several pieces of "art" on a slider. Tests have shown the particular pieces featured has an effect on opt-in rate.

      #1 It depends on the market.

      #2 Colors have a very definite affect on peoples' state of mind.

      If you have a major theme color, you should defiantly test other colors.

      I've found shades of Blue to work best for MMO niches.

      You should test every variable of your squeeze page, one at a time.
      I obviously wasn't talking about literally selling art. I was talking about landing page aesthetics and graphical design elements vs information or the general "ugly page vs pretty page" argument which the OP was asking about

      I am not going to waste much time debating the issue, but as someone that's generated 10s of millions of dollars online and spent many millions on traffic, color and color schemes are largely irrelevant beyond using it to guide the users attention. there are some general universal truths - grays tend to do bad as a primary color, browns tend to do bad as primacy colors. same color text/background tends to do bad (light blue text against dark blue background for example) but other than that, it isn't going to matter much.

      it certainly isn't a big factor in whether or not a page will perform. you can make a button any color you want but if the text on the button says "continue to 54 page survey" no one will click it. the information you put on that button and around it will determine how many people will click on it. that said, red will usually outperform green for a button but if you put the wrong text on it, it won't.

      landing pages are about information and the presentation of information... not about creating cool art in terms of graphic design. users are looking for information. they are looking for answers.
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