7 replies
What do you guys think about selling gigs online (i.e, photography, designs, music etc) V.S Internet Marketing?

I have some friends that are designers. People can easily create their own gigs on Fiverr or Upwork and bank some cash on the side. However, as an internet marketer, I told them to do what I do. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but since they're designers they could easily create content and make it go viral on Facebook. Then find ways to monetize to audience. For example, they can easily just create a t-shirts and run an ad on it. Personally I find this much easier. I used to make music for artists and it's such a struggle. The composition take too long to even get a song done, mix and then engineer it by someone else.

What are your thoughts for someone who is selling their skills online V.S an actual marketer ? Granted, some marketers are not designers so they have to outsource. However, if you're a designer you don't need to outsource anymore. Does anyone know what I'm saying? Designers or video animator can easily just create the content, publish it onto their fan page and drive traffic, then monetize.

Best,
MMO
#gigs #selling
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  • Profile picture of the author zefriks
    Why you compared this two things?
    Although you selling gigs, you also need an internet marketing to grow up your gigs.
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    • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
      Originally Posted by zefriks View Post

      Why you compared this two things?
      Although you selling gigs, you also need an internet marketing to grow up your gigs.
      This is true. Plus, even if you used Fiverr as your main gig source, you still have to use "internet marketing" to promote your gigs, in order to attract more attention to your service. Even after you publish a new gig on fiverr, they'll suggest that you expose it to your social media contacts. That's internet marketing too, right?
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  • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
    Selling services via gigs is a great way to make some quick cash, build reputation, test markets, etc...ultimately why most people evolve into products is to gain the leverage that comes with packaging once and selling many times instead of trading time for money as is the case with services.

    That said, the two can go hand-in-hand very well.

    You sell services into a given market and then capture the knowledge and experience gained in that to package your own how-to product (course, program, ebook, etc...)
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  • Profile picture of the author Trey Morgan
    I think it's best to choose one but eventually do both. So, if you're going to be a freelancer, then be a freelancer. If you're going to be an internet marketer then be an internet marketer. I not sure if one is better than the other. I think it just depends on the person and his/her goals and beliefs.

    Personally I believe the ideal situation would be to combine the two.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mr Lim
    You are comparing service providing and business owner, it doesn't make any sense comparing both.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ralfs
    Selling services is great if you need some money in the beggining. This money you can invest in your internet marketing business.

    So I would suggest everyone start off with gigs because you can learn so many things from gigs.

    Also I would say that everyone should find something you are good at. Two important things - find something you're good at and when somebody pays money to you and second find something you like and enjoy.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    First off, telling all your friends that what they are doing is wrong and that they should change to be more like you seems like a good way to lose friends. Ask any MLMer who pitched their deal to everyone they knew and joined the NFL (No Friends Left).

    That said, sometimes it's a matter of personal psychology. I know a few freelancers who are great at bringing other peoples' visions to life, but would be their own worst nightmare as their own 'client.'

    I'm also skeptical of the 'build an audience and then figure out how to monetize it' plan. Especially if that build-an-audience plan is 'just create some viral content.' If it were that easy, the big companies that spend hundreds of thousands trying to create viral content would own the Internet.

    Back before the dotcom bust of 2000, millions were sunk into ventures that had huge audiences but no visible means of monetization. When those means failed to materialize, the startups went belly up and those millions were lost.

    More recently, look at the folks who relied on building huge lists of Facebook fans. Over the last few years, as FB concentrated more on their own monetization, those people have seen the value of those fans erode as organic reach shrank until most brands were seeing 5% or less organic reach. The latest algorithm change has pretty much obliterated that, leaving those who depended on FB organic reach pretty much SOL.

    The most successful freelancers I know use a combination of a stable client base who pay professional level fees coupled with their own product/service, usually some form of knowledge product (books, online courses) and coaching. They aren't doing penny ante $5 gigs on Fiverr or competing in the race to the bottom of the barrel on Upwork.
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