GAMER! Tools For a YouTube Gaming Channel

18 replies


Point 7? Most Important.

1. No affiliate links are used in this thread.

2. I live in the UK. Some links are UK-based.

3. Don't buy from the links. Shop around for good deals.

4. The free links exist so you can get the free tools.

5. The links for paid tools exist so you can learn more about the tools

6. This is not a tutorial on how to become a YouTube gamer.

7. Tom is a beautiful hunk of man flesh.

8. This thread is a list of suggested tools for YouTube gamers.

9. Nothing is set in stone. Just my opinions and experiences.

10. Some tools are obvious. The intention is to be thorough.

11. Some tools (I hope) are very much not obvious.

The Long Road.

Lara Croft's Buttocks.

14 out of 10 people who decide to turn a YouTube channel into a business will run a gaming channel.

(No no, don't argue, my capuchin monkeyservant assures me that statistic is accurate.)

Furthermore, YouTube gaming channels are quite popular.

The second most subscribed channel on YouTube is Gaming, with 77,775,274 subscribers.

51% of American male Millennial users watched, in 2016, gaming channels.

The most subscribed creator on YouTube, Pewdiepie, got his start as a gamer.

65% of American households in 2017 were home to occupants who regularly played video games.

90% of U.S gamers watched, in 2016, YouTube gaming videos at least once a week.

Gaming videos on YouTube? More popular than sheep porn in a Welsh farming community.

This offers part of the reason for the rise of gaming channels: a case of supply and demand.

It also explains why Welsh farmers think Will Ferrell is "Ooooooo, he's a bit of alright."


Are there other reasons for the rise of gaming channels, you scream? Of course, of course.

Is there another job that let's us spend 18 hours a day gazing at Lara Croft's buttocks?

I think not.

To Gaze at Buttocks, or Not to Gaze at Buttocks.

But this begs a question, doesn't it? Question being, should you become a YouTube gamer?

I feel the unanimous answer on Warrior Forum will be a resounding No. And that answer is not without merit.

One word: competition. It is. A bit. Tough.

1. There are more creators who own gaming channels than I own bottles of vodka.

2. Audiences are loyal and resistant to trying new gaming channels. (Not a fact; it's my own perception.)

3. The tech and ability requirements to compete can often be high.

4. Many keywords are dominated by long-standing channels.

If your marketing strategy is to run a gaming channel where the first hurdle is to get accepted on the YouTube Partner Program and the second hurdle is to earn an income from AdWords monetization, then (almost surely) you have a long road ahead.

Are the odds for success good? No, not remotely.

To be very clear, your chances of success are roughly the same chance of success that I have when I walk into the bedroom on a Friday night, resplendent in my best Hello Kitty undies, and give a cheeky wink to Mrs. A in the hopes that she'll . . . watch an Evil Dead marathon.

To be very very clear: the chances of success are really quite low.


So what should you do? On the one hand, you have the option to spend part of your day goggling at the glorious buttocks of Lara Croft. On the other hand? Well, on the other hand, you have some British git (that would be me) telling you - in not so many words - not to bother.

But am I really saying that? Well - yes and no.

If you care to take it, this is my advice:

1. Do Not Run a Gaming Channel.

If your strategy is to eventually monetize with YouTube Partners, and if you wish a decent chance at monetary success, and if money is your only motivation, then (my advice) walk away.
2. Do Run a Gaming Channel.

If you can treat the running of a gaming channel as part business and part hobby, and if you are unconcerned about monetary success with the channel, and if you are motivated due to the prospect of fun and (if it happens, sure) perhaps monetary success in the future, then - yes - stick around, consider running a gaming channel.
Point is. Not beat you over the head (with Croft buttocks). This business?

It's a long road.

The purpose of this thread, though, is not to convince you either way. The preamble so far is just my way of setting the scene. The real purpose here is to tell you about the tools required to run a gaming channel on YouTube, should you decide to take the plunge . . . into Croft's buttocks.

These tools? They fall into 2 categories:

1. Tangible tools.

2. Tip Tools.

And so! If you wish to consider running such a channel, or if you intend to dive right into (Croft) it, this thread aims to give you some useful tools.

If I forget to include any tools, please plop them down below for us.

(I'm sure I'm not the only member of WF with knowledge about the subject.)

Similarly, if you feel the need for more tools, you can either ask me in this thread or slap some searches into YouTube and Google.

And now?

Time for those tools . . .

The Tech.

We're going to look at tech tools in 2 categories.

1. The Obnoxious Git.
2. The Budget Creator.

I would absolutely recommend - to any newbies - that you opt for Budget Creator tools.

Unless you have money to burn? I think it's the prudent approach. Entirely up to you, though.

Furthermore, I'm about to represent two extremes here: high-cost and either low-cost or no-cost.

There is - obviously - middle ground for you to consider.

Lastly, in some cases I'll give specific recommendations and links, and in other cases I'll be giving you general specs to aid you if you go looking to buy.

The Obnoxious Git.

First up, the obnoxious git. So obnoxious, in fact, that NASA has said the following:

What a git. What an obnoxious git. He makes us feel like we're using an Acorn Electron from 1987.

Source: NASA. Not to be confused with National Aeronautics and Space Administration, that would surely do to Tom, for fabricating a quote from them, what Welsh farmers are currently doing to Welsh sheep, but rather the other NASA, National Administration for Sheep Adoration.

Desktop Computer.

- Intel Core I7/ I9.
- 64GB DDR4 3200mhz Memory.
- Nvidia (GPU) GTX 1080 Ti 11GB.
- 1TB SSD.
- 2 TB SATA3 SSHD.
- VR
- Liquid Cooling.
- Win 10

The above is overkill.

I can recommend the setup but I absolutely cannot recommend it to anyone starting a business.

It is (definitely) not required.

There are, however, elements and similar elements that I can certainly suggest, should you wish to run the business at quite an optimal level.

- I7.
- 16/ 32GB DDR4.
- Nvidia 1060 to 1080/ 1080 Ti.
- At least a 500GB SSD.
- 1TB HDD with 7200/ 10,000 RPM.
- Win 10.

That rig is more than capable of being fairly obnoxious.

You can play games on Ultra.

You can edit videos.

You can stream.

And you can do all of that pretty well indeed.

I say this to anyone getting a rig for gaming:

Buy what you can afford and focus on the base unit specs more than accessories.
The base unit is the heart.

One element on that list may not be too obvious (it may; I have no idea).

The SSD.

You'll get faster load times and a smoother gaming experience with an SSD.


One other element to mention is the GPU.

If you can afford a 1080 or 1080 Ti (8GB and 11GB respectively) get one.

You don't absolutely need it, but you'll be somewhat future-protecting yourself and you'll have a smoother experience on Ultra.


Desktop Accessories.

Monitor.

- 1440P to 2160P
- G-SYNC.
- 144 Hz, 1 ms.

[G-SYNC]

V-SYNC ensures that your video card syncs to your monitor's refresh rate. G-SYNC will update your monitor, on a frame by frame basis, when the frame is sent from your video card.

[Resolution]

Most YouTube viewers are still rocking 1080P. A 1080P monitor isn't obnoxious, but it's fine. Obviously higher resolutions are useful. You can still play games and edit in 4K but it helps not to be blind. These resolutions in a monitor are not necessary; just useful.

[Response Rates]

The faster, the better.

Mouse.

- Razer Mamba.
- BenQ ZOWIE FK1+ Mouse for e-Sports.
- A gaming mouse from Logitech.

Mouse Mat.

- Glorious Extended Gaming Mouse Mat.

Light.

- Neewer Face Light.

Headset.

- Razer Man'War.

Keyboard.

- Razer BlackWidow Chroma V2.
- Logitech G413 Carbon
- Most Razer, Corsair, & Logitech gaming keyboards.

Speakers.

- Audioengine A2+
- Good makes: Logitech and Cyber Acoustics.

VR Headset.

- HTC Vive (Best IMO).
- Oculus Rift.

External HDD.

- 16TB
- OR, 8TB

You'll need external storage for your video and audio files. (Though not so much for audio.)

Such as:

- Footage.
- Published.
- Projects.
- Effects.

Microphone.

- Rode NT1-A.
- Blue Yeti.
- Decent Pop-Filter. (Amazon)
- Decent microphone arm stand. (Amazon.)

Noise Reduction.

- Pro Acoustic Foam Wedge Tiles.

Software.

Video Editing.

- Adobe Premiere Pro CC
- Final Cut Pro X (Mac)

Image Editing.

- Adobe Photoshop CC

PC Game Recording.

- GeForce Experience/ Shadowplay (Nvidia.)
- Open Broadcaster Software/ OBS Studio.
- Fraps.

Audio.

- Audacity (free).

Gaming.

- Steam.
- G2A.

I personally find the G2A Goldmine affiliate program to be a bit lacking.

Just my opinion.

However, G2A itself is an invaluable resource.

You can get legit savings on PC and console games. Oh, and software other than games.

You'll already have a Steam account; included just in case.

Free Mods.

- NexusMods.

Consoles.

- Xbox One X.
- Or, Xbox One S.

- PS4 Pro.
- PS4.

To be truly obnoxious, get the X and the Pro.

Although I joke a little, to go high end on your gaming channel?

Get the Pro and the X if you can.

It boils down to the end result of how your video looks.

Even games not in 4K look crisper and play better (obviously).

And even if you downscale 4K footage to 1080P (the norm here) your 1080P footage from 4K (for games that play in 4K) will still look crisper than regular 1080P recorded in 1080P.

Console Accessories.

Game Recording.

- 4K60 PRO.
- HD60 PRO.
- Cam Link
- Chat Link
- Game Capture Software

While not necessary, it doesn't hurt to have an external HDD, two controllers, and a 4K television for your consoles.

The second controller? So your mum can be a studio guest.

And tell your hard-earned COD audience that you peed the bed until you were 24.

Camera.

Basic Choices:

- DSLR.
- Mirrorless.
- Compact.

The obnoxious git recommendation?

DSLR or Mirrorless.

But compact (point-and-click) cameras have their place.

Pros of compacts:

- Small: slip in your pocket.
- Cost: (relative terms) can be cheaper.
- Fixed lens: less to worry about.
- Big depth of field: foreground and background in focus (not always what you want, though).
- Newbie-friendly: intuitive and user-friendly.
- Functions: all the functions you'll need.

Cons of compacts:

- 4K: (usually) less 4K shooting duration.
- Overheating: (often) overheating can be an issue.
- Image Quality: less than DSLRs (though gap may not matter for you).
- Upgrades: harder to evolve; no lens additions, fewer accessories.
- Precision: less control over speed, aperture, etc.

DSLR Suggestions:

- Canon 70D.
- Canon EOS 5D Mark IV.
- Canon EOS REBEL T7i.

Mirrorless Suggestions:

- Sony A6500.
- Sony A6300.
- Sony a7S II.
- Panasonic Lumix GH5.
- Panasonic Lumix G7

Compact Suggestions:

- Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II.
- Sony RX100 V.

In the cases there without a flip-out LCD, you can tether your camera to a laptop (need the lead). Useful if you also vlog as well as stream. Only downside to the Sonys is Jelly Effect, but that's not an issue for a gamer, since you're not whipping around the camera to pan.

Can We Be More Obnoxious? Always.

That brings us to the end of Obnoxious Git.

Can you be more of an obnoxious turd? Always


You can be decidedly more obnoxious - and I'll probably beef up the list - but our list is still fairly obnoxious and includes necessary obnoxious tools.

Semi-joking aside, the above gear will allow for high-end production on your gaming channel, and you can not only cover a wide range of games but also gaming platforms.

I left out some popular consoles (like the Nintendo Switch) and retro game consoles, as well as omitting a bunch of other hardware that we could have looked at.

Those and other tools I may add to the list in the future. The initial intention here is to give you tools for a more widely popular/ common setup.

The Budget Creator.

This time around we look at tech tools for the budget-conscious.

Computer.

- Desktop or Laptop.

A desktop is generally considered better than a laptop for gaming. Myself, I use a desktop for gaming, video editing, 3D modelling, and any other demanding software or activities that can put a strain on a computer system, and I use a laptop (as I am now) for everything else.

That said, when you're on a budget, just so long as the specs are up to par, you're good to go with either laptop or desktop. Just be aware that unless your laptop is high end, you'll get stuttering and lower FPS in-game (but you already know that; state the obvious, Tom).

These are comfortable minimum specs:

- I7
- 16GM Ram.
- 250 SSD.
- 1TB HDD.
- Nvidia 1060 (6GB)
- Win 10.

You can get away with an I5 (plenty of creators grew their channels on them) but I really wouldn't recommend it.

The above rig will comfortably play on Medium and will struggle a little on High and Ultra.

When I say struggle - you can probably play well enough, but when it comes time to edit, you're really going to notice every tiny little thing, and so will your audience.

If you're modding, especially, I would recommend no more than 100 mods on that system (not graphic-intensive mods, either) and absolutely do not go over 200.

That's a bit subjective (100 and 200), because it depends on the mods, but it's a fairly safe, general guideline.

Desktop Accessories.

Don't worry about pricey noise reduction or expensive mouse, keyboard, speakers, and monitor.

If anything? Put your money into the mouse.

If you can? Throw some money into whatever monitor you can afford.

The mouse is (obviously) more important (when on a budget) because it directly impacts your ability when playing the games.

Then we have external HDD and VR.

Do you need them? Absolutely not, no.

It depends on the size of your internal HDD, though. Give it a few months and you'll need an external HDD.

You can always use cloud, I suppose, but I'm old school and I prefer to keep video footage on storage in the office.

To save space, make sure you're junking your captured footage after use.

(Just so long as you feel it absolutely won't be needed again.)

(Saying that, I keep most of my footage; it's good for compilations.)

Monitor.

- Whatever you can afford.
- Faster response times are better. (Signified by MS)

Mouse.

- Anything nice from Logitech.

Keyboard.

- Any halfway decent gamer keyboard.
- Or any keyword.
- Logitech is pretty decent.

Speakers.

- Anything by logitech.
- Anything (sound is sound on a budget).

VR Headset.

- Forget this.

External HDD.

- Forget this (for now).

Microphone.

- Blue Yeti
- Blue Snowball (Cheaper but Tinny)

Noise Reduction.

- Throw a blanket behind you. (It helps to literally blanket noise.)

Software.

Video Editing.

- Shotcut (Free.)

Image Editing.

- GIMP (Free.)

PC Game Recording.

- GeForce Experience/ Shadowplay (Nvidia.) (Free.)
- Open Broadcaster Software/ OBS Studio. (Free.)
- Fraps. (Free & Paid.)

Audio.

- Audacity. (Free.)

Gaming.

- Steam. (Free to get account.)
- G2A. ((Free to get account.)

Free Mods.

Same as last time - depending on your games, use the free mods on Nexusmods.

(You probably already do?)

Consoles.

- Xbox One S.
- Or, PS4.

Console Accessories.

Game Recording.

I'll leave these as above. All are useful. Obviously, if you're not console gaming, it doesn't matter.

- 4K60 PRO.
- HD60 PRO.
- Cam Link
- Chat Link
- Game Capture Software

Camera.

Buget Choices:

- Second-Hand DSLR or Mirrorless.
- 1080P/ 4K Compact.
- Webcam.

Webcam Suggestion:

- Logitech HD Pro C920.

Can We Be More Budget? Sure.

This is the score.

If you're on a budget, you can get started for even less than the above.

I include the above because I'm trying to be thorough.

Fact is, it obviously depends on your requirements.

If you're playing something like Minecraft or Survival Craft 2 on a PC?

You're not exactly going to need a killer rig.

If you want to get started, and if you're on a tight as hell budget . . .

Then this is what you need:

(We're talking bare-buttock minimum requirements)

- I5 Laptop/ Desktop
- Nvidia
- GeForce Experience.
- Blue Snowball.
- Shotcut.
- Steam.
- G2A
- Audacity
- GIMP

If you want to take the console route?

- I5 Laptop/ Desktop
- Nvidia
- GeForce Experience.
- Blue Snowball.
- Shotcut.
- G2A
- Audacity
- GIMP
- PS4/ XB 1 S
- Basic Elgato


Either of those solutions - Sir or Madam - will get you started.

Obviously, you're not going to be rocking COD WWII on your PC.

It'll get you started.

The Tips.

You have the tech tools. Now let me give you some tip tools.

1. Commentating.

Full stop: you are required to commentate your videos.

Video game content may be monetised if the associated step-by-step commentary is strictly tied to the live action being shown and is of instructional or educational value.
Source: YouTube.
So - at the very least - you need to lend voice-over to your videos.

Some studios don't require it, but YouTube can consider it a breach of Fair Use, so you're best off adding at least audio commentary.

2. Commercial-Use Rights.

When you make a gaming video, what you're doing is using the assets owned by one or more game studios.

You have 2 choices:

1. Join a gaming network (MCN).
2. Follow commercial-use rights.

I may add gaming networks (otherwise known as multi-channel networks/ MCN) to this thread in the future. I don't recommend them so - for now - I'll leave them out of the equation.

The best route - IMO - is the second option. This is debatable, I know; it's just my own preference/ experience. Without an MCN in the picture, whatever you earn is 100% your own, no contracts to sign (and argue over), no drama.

Question is, how do you know if you can use a game for your channel?

1. Find out the game studio behind the game.
2. Go to their website.
3. Find the commercial-use terms.

Failing the above 1 to 3, just whack a search into YouTube:

[name of game studio] youtube monetization

Chances are fairly decent that you can use the game, but each studio has different terms and you need to follow them.

Also, keep in mind that these terms can change at any time.

Bonus Tip: Turn the music off in the game settings. These assets are often not owned by the game studio and you can get strikes.

To get you started, let me just link you to some useful studio pages. This way you can get an idea of what you're looking for when you go searching for them yourself.

Game Studios That Allow YouTube Monetization:

1. Mojang. (Click "Commercial Usage Guidelines.)
2. Bethesda Softworks.
3. Valve.

I may add to that list.

Golden rule: don't take my word for it, because those 3 example pages above can change literally at the drop of a hat. Do your due diligence - research.

3. Game Choice.

This is vital when you start out.

The first instinct? To play your favourite game.

It could be a good idea. It probably isn't.

1. Stick to one game initially.
2. If possible select a new title that will explode in popularity.
3. Find your niche in the game. Mods? Compilations? Etc.
4. Cover new developments for it. Updates. DLC. Etc.

A textbook example of a creator sticking to (primarily) one game: MrBossFTW.

4. Brand & Collection.

Make your channel look professional, give it character, and help it stand out.

1. Brand cover art and profile.
2. Brand your intro sequence.

Expand your audience reach and collect that audience.

1. Branch out from YouTube into Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.
2. Have a strong presence on Reddit.
3. Collect followers.
4. Collect email subscribers.

You can make intro videos in Adobe After Effects, but the cheaper, low-tech option is to pay for one on Fiverr.

5. Streaming.

To stream or not to stream?

1. Get experience with publishing before streaming.
2. Stream (related to 1) at peek times in North America.
3. Use stream footage for publishing.

6. Routine.

YouTube and audiences reward you for regular publishing.

1. Decide on a publishing routine.
2. State it on your channel (days of the week).
3. Stick to it.

7. Intros.

1. Grab your audience.
2. Seek engagement.
3. Brand.

8. Outros.

1. Promotion.
2. Seek engagement.
3. Encourage further viewing of your content.

9. Reddit.

1. Post on Reddit a lot.
2. Follow the 1 to 10 Reddit rule.
3. Share your videos.

10. Monetization.


You won't get onto the YouTube Partner Program overnight.

And so? Squeeze money out of your channel from the get-go.

1. Affiliate Marketing - games, hardware.
2. Patreon - regular sponsorship.
3. Merchandise - when you have brand loyalty, use it (store).
4. Endorsements - when available, consider them.

A word on endorsements.

Don't accept the first deal thrown your way.

They're almost never good and lock you into a contract you won't enjoy.

Be selective.

You don't need endorsement.

If you get a contract?

1. Google other people who have the similar/ same contract.
2. Run it by family and friends.
3. Have a lawyer give it a look.

Most endorsement offers that come your way won't be under contract.

These are going to be other marketers looking for promotion in your videos.

1. Follow sponsorship rules on YouTube.
2. Consider what your audience will think.
3. Your audience comes first (because it's hard to earn and easy to lose).

Don't Be Shy . . .
Show Me Your Tool.



I am . . . keen . . . to see your tool.

Whip out your tool or - if you have multiple tools?

Show me all your tools.

As I say above, I'll probably add more tools. For now - enjoy!

Cheers,

Tom
#channel #gamer #gaming #tools #youtube
  • Profile picture of the author Shawn Ng
    Great guide! Thanks for sharing.
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  • Profile picture of the author agmccall
    Another one of those posts that I have to convert to a pdf so I can read it on my kindle when I have free time LOL

    Great info, lots of new bookmarks for me

    al
    Signature
    The Flu? Not worthy of a mention here???
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    Thanks Shawn and Al.

    Al brings up a great point here:

    Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

    Another one of those posts that I have to convert to a pdf so I can read it on my kindle when I have free time LOL

    Great info, lots of new bookmarks for me

    al
    We can read WF posts in PDF (which I often do myself; easier on the eyeballs).

    This is how I do it (I'm in Classic View; not sure if it makes a difference):

    1. Scroll up to the first post.
    2. Click the black and white + icon.
    3. Select Print.
    4. Where you see Destination, select Change.
    5. Select PDF.
    6. Hit Save.
    7. Choose where you want the PDF saved on your computer.

    You have other ways of doing it (using the + icon) but I like the formatting of the 1 to 7 approach.

    Cheers,

    Tom
    Signature

    I Coach: Learn More | My Latest WF Thread: Dead Domains/ Passive Traffic

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  • Profile picture of the author greyvoid
    Wow, you made a realy really good job! I hope that you will do more more with every day! For scenario of yours vidoes is really important do not use plagiarism. I used to check this on plag detector https://rehtwogunraconteur.com/check-for-plagiarism/. It is really nice service that can easily help any users.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sparky Heretic
    This is a great post! There is some serious gold here. I love the value you have provided and the world is a better place for you having written it.

    As a former (and possibly future) streamer, I would like to add a few things from my experiences:

    You don't need a great camera for your face; it's only going to take up a small space on your viewer's screen. I used a Logitech C920 and it worked great and it was only about $50. The auto face focus is really useful.

    A capture card is absolutely necessary if you are console gaming and want to look professional with an overlay and a face camera. I used the Elgato HD60 and strongly encourage any future streamers to use 60 frames per second if they can. The difference is outstanding. If you had a choice between 720p at 60fps and 1080 at 30fps, take the 720. It looks so much better. Also, if you have 2 PC's, you can dedicate one to gaming and one to streaming to lighten the load with this little contraption.

    You're going to need a fast upload speed. For HD streams, a minimum of 7Mbps upload will be required. Absolute minimum.

    The audio is super important. Getting the game volume mixed with your audio volume is critical. You can actually process your voice on the fly to make it sound like you're recording from a pro sound studio instead of your living room full of hardwood floors. (My house has no carpet.) I don't have room for too much detail, but I used VB-Cable, VSTHost (dat 1999 web design, doe), and VST plugins such as dereverb to great effect.

    Use a green screen if your budget allows it. That C920 I mentioned will key out any color you wish as a built in feature as will most broadcasting software.

    Speaking of broadcast software, I recommend Open Broadcast Software. (OBS) Free software usually means a trade off between functionality and cost. There are a few exceptions, though, such as Open Office, Linux, and OBS. With this software, you can easily adjust the timing of your audio and video of both the game and your camera/mic to make sure everything syncs up. You can choose your upload quality, add a graphic overlay with your social media info, and even add a one-click custom BRB screen for those Mountain Dew induced trips to the potty. My Elgato included a broadcast software, but it didn't have the functionality of OBS and I didn't end up using it. If you're just getting started, don't reinvent the wheel here. Go with OBS.

    I think that's it. If you have any questions, I would be glad to help. Thank you again, Tom for this post. I love reading your stuff. Funny and well written, as always.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    Thank you very much for the kind words, Sparky Heretic - you made my day!

    Not to sound like a mutual appreciation society, but for anyone reading, this is GOLD:

    Originally Posted by Sparky Heretic View Post

    This is a great post! There is some serious gold here. I love the value you have provided and the world is a better place for you having written it.

    As a former (and possibly future) streamer, I would like to add a few things from my experiences:

    You don't need a great camera for your face; it's only going to take up a small space on your viewer's screen. I used a Logitech C920 and it worked great and it was only about $50. The auto face focus is really useful.

    A capture card is absolutely necessary if you are console gaming and want to look professional with an overlay and a face camera. I used the Elgato HD60 and strongly encourage any future streamers to use 60 frames per second if they can. The difference is outstanding. If you had a choice between 720p at 60fps and 1080 at 30fps, take the 720. It looks so much better. Also, if you have 2 PC's, you can dedicate one to gaming and one to streaming to lighten the load with this little contraption.

    You're going to need a fast upload speed. For HD streams, a minimum of 7Mbps upload will be required. Absolute minimum.

    The audio is super important. Getting the game volume mixed with your audio volume is critical. You can actually process your voice on the fly to make it sound like you're recording from a pro sound studio instead of your living room full of hardwood floors. (My house has no carpet.) I don't have room for too much detail, but I used VB-Cable, VSTHost (dat 1999 web design, doe), and VST plugins such as dereverb to great effect.

    Use a green screen if your budget allows it. That C920 I mentioned will key out any color you wish as a built in feature as will most broadcasting software.

    Speaking of broadcast software, I recommend Open Broadcast Software. (OBS) Free software usually means a trade off between functionality and cost. There are a few exceptions, though, such as Open Office, Linux, and OBS. With this software, you can easily adjust the timing of your audio and video of both the game and your camera/mic to make sure everything syncs up. You can choose your upload quality, add a graphic overlay with your social media info, and even add a one-click custom BRB screen for those Mountain Dew induced trips to the potty. My Elgato included a broadcast software, but it didn't have the functionality of OBS and I didn't end up using it. If you're just getting started, don't reinvent the wheel here. Go with OBS.

    I think that's it. If you have any questions, I would be glad to help. Thank you again, Tom for this post. I love reading your stuff. Funny and well written, as always.
    I was going to bold each point I found gold; then I realised it would all be bold, lol. Thanks for the contribution, matey (throw anything else you like into the thread), and I hope you will stream again soon.

    To everyone else, streaming is a great way to boost subs with a new channel.

    You need to get some experience under your belt with publishing first (IMO), just to get the hang of everything, including your tech, but streaming is the logical next step.

    It may not be something you choose to do with regularity, but it's a nice way to grow subs - having more direct contact with people helps to convert them.

    The other plus is easy footage. You can kill two birds here - use your footage for publishing.

    Great post, Heretic!!!

    Cheers,

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author DURABLEOILCOM
    Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post



    Point 7? Most Important.

    1. No affiliate links are used in this thread.

    2. I live in the UK. Some links are UK-based.

    3. Don't buy from the links. Shop around for good deals.

    4. The free links exist so you can get the free tools.

    5. The links for paid tools exist so you can learn more about the tools

    6. This is not a tutorial on how to become a YouTube gamer.

    7. Tom is a beautiful hunk of man flesh.

    8. This thread is a list of suggested tools for YouTube gamers.

    9. Nothing is set in stone. Just my opinions and experiences.

    10. Some tools are obvious. The intention is to be thorough.

    11. Some tools (I hope) are very much not obvious.

    The Long Road.

    Lara Croft's Buttocks.

    14 out of 10 people who decide to turn a YouTube channel into a business will run a gaming channel.

    (No no, don't argue, my capuchin monkeyservant assures me that statistic is accurate.)

    Furthermore, YouTube gaming channels are quite popular.

    The second most subscribed channel on YouTube is Gaming, with 77,775,274 subscribers.

    51% of American male Millennial users watched, in 2016, gaming channels.

    The most subscribed creator on YouTube, Pewdiepie, got his start as a gamer.

    65% of American households in 2017 were home to occupants who regularly played video games.

    90% of U.S gamers watched, in 2016, YouTube gaming videos at least once a week.

    Gaming videos on YouTube? More popular than sheep porn in a Welsh farming community.

    This offers part of the reason for the rise of gaming channels: a case of supply and demand.

    It also explains why Welsh farmers think Will Ferrell is "Ooooooo, he's a bit of alright."


    Are there other reasons for the rise of gaming channels, you scream? Of course, of course.

    Is there another job that let's us spend 18 hours a day gazing at Lara Croft's buttocks?

    I think not.

    To Gaze at Buttocks, or Not to Gaze at Buttocks.

    But this begs a question, doesn't it? Question being, should you become a YouTube gamer?

    I feel the unanimous answer on Warrior Forum will be a resounding No. And that answer is not without merit.

    One word: competition. It is. A bit. Tough.

    1. There are more creators who own gaming channels than I own bottles of vodka.

    2. Audiences are loyal and resistant to trying new gaming channels. (Not a fact; it's my own perception.)

    3. The tech and ability requirements to compete can often be high.

    4. Many keywords are dominated by long-standing channels.

    If your marketing strategy is to run a gaming channel where the first hurdle is to get accepted on the YouTube Partner Program and the second hurdle is to earn an income from AdWords monetization, then (almost surely) you have a long road ahead.

    Are the odds for success good? No, not remotely.

    To be very clear, your chances of success are roughly the same chance of success that I have when I walk into the bedroom on a Friday night, resplendent in my best Hello Kitty undies, and give a cheeky wink to Mrs. A in the hopes that she'll . . . watch an Evil Dead marathon.

    To be very very clear: the chances of success are really quite low.


    So what should you do? On the one hand, you have the option to spend part of your day goggling at the glorious buttocks of Lara Croft. On the other hand? Well, on the other hand, you have some British git (that would be me) telling you - in not so many words - not to bother.

    But am I really saying that? Well - yes and no.

    If you care to take it, this is my advice:

    1. Do Not Run a Gaming Channel.



    2. Do Run a Gaming Channel.



    Point is. Not beat you over the head (with Croft buttocks). This business?

    It's a long road.

    The purpose of this thread, though, is not to convince you either way. The preamble so far is just my way of setting the scene. The real purpose here is to tell you about the tools required to run a gaming channel on YouTube, should you decide to take the plunge . . . into Croft's buttocks.

    These tools? They fall into 2 categories:

    1. Tangible tools.

    2. Tip Tools.

    And so! If you wish to consider running such a channel, or if you intend to dive right into (Croft) it, this thread aims to give you some useful tools.

    If I forget to include any tools, please plop them down below for us.

    (I'm sure I'm not the only member of WF with knowledge about the subject.)

    Similarly, if you feel the need for more tools, you can either ask me in this thread or slap some searches into YouTube and Google.

    And now?

    Time for those tools . . .

    The Tech.

    We're going to look at tech tools in 2 categories.

    1. The Obnoxious Git.
    2. The Budget Creator.

    I would absolutely recommend - to any newbies - that you opt for Budget Creator tools.

    Unless you have money to burn? I think it's the prudent approach. Entirely up to you, though.

    Furthermore, I'm about to represent two extremes here: high-cost and either low-cost or no-cost.

    There is - obviously - middle ground for you to consider.

    Lastly, in some cases I'll give specific recommendations and links, and in other cases I'll be giving you general specs to aid you if you go looking to buy.

    The Obnoxious Git.

    First up, the obnoxious git. So obnoxious, in fact, that NASA has said the following:




    Desktop Computer.

    - Intel Core I7/ I9.
    - 64GB DDR4 3200mhz Memory.
    - Nvidia (GPU) GTX 1080 Ti 11GB.
    - 1TB SSD.
    - 2 TB SATA3 SSHD.
    - VR
    - Liquid Cooling.
    - Win 10

    The above is overkill.

    I can recommend the setup but I absolutely cannot recommend it to anyone starting a business.

    It is (definitely) not required.

    There are, however, elements and similar elements that I can certainly suggest, should you wish to run the business at quite an optimal level.

    - I7.
    - 16/ 32GB DDR4.
    - Nvidia 1060 to 1080/ 1080 Ti.
    - At least a 500GB SSD.
    - 1TB HDD with 7200/ 10,000 RPM.
    - Win 10.

    That rig is more than capable of being fairly obnoxious.

    You can play games on Ultra.

    You can edit videos.

    You can stream.

    And you can do all of that pretty well indeed.

    I say this to anyone getting a rig for gaming:



    The base unit is the heart.

    One element on that list may not be too obvious (it may; I have no idea).

    The SSD.

    You'll get faster load times and a smoother gaming experience with an SSD.

    HDD vs SSD

    One other element to mention is the GPU.

    If you can afford a 1080 or 1080 Ti (8GB and 11GB respectively) get one.

    You don't absolutely need it, but you'll be somewhat future-protecting yourself and you'll have a smoother experience on Ultra.

    GTA V GTX 1060 vs. GTX 1070 vs. GTX 1080 4K

    Desktop Accessories.

    Monitor.

    - 1440P to 2160P
    - G-SYNC.
    - 144 Hz, 1 ms.

    [G-SYNC]

    V-SYNC ensures that your video card syncs to your monitor's refresh rate. G-SYNC will update your monitor, on a frame by frame basis, when the frame is sent from your video card.

    [Resolution]

    Most YouTube viewers are still rocking 1080P. A 1080P monitor isn't obnoxious, but it's fine. Obviously higher resolutions are useful. You can still play games and edit in 4K but it helps not to be blind. These resolutions in a monitor are not necessary; just useful.

    [Response Rates]

    The faster, the better.

    Mouse.

    - Razer Mamba.
    - A gaming mouse from Logitech.

    Keyboard.

    - Razer BlackWidow Chroma V2.
    - Logitech G413 Carbon
    - Most Razer, Corsair, & Logitech gaming keyboards.

    Speakers.

    - Audioengine A2+
    - Good makes: Logitech and Cyber Acoustics.

    VR Headset.

    - HTC Vive (Best IMO).
    - Oculus Rift.

    External HDD.

    - 16TB
    - OR, 8TB

    You'll need external storage for your video and audio files. (Though not so much for audio.)

    Such as:

    - Footage.
    - Published.
    - Projects.
    - Effects.

    Microphone.

    - Rode NT1-A.
    - Blue Yeti.
    - Decent Pop-Filter. (Amazon)
    - Decent microphone arm stand. (Amazon.)

    Noise Reduction.

    - Pro Acoustic Foam Wedge Tiles.

    Software.

    Video Editing.

    - Adobe Premiere Pro CC
    - Final Cut Pro X (Mac)

    Image Editing.

    - Adobe Photoshop CC

    PC Game Recording.

    - GeForce Experience/ Shadowplay (Nvidia.)
    - Open Broadcaster Software/ OBS Studio.
    - Fraps.

    Audio.

    - Audacity (free).

    Gaming.

    - Steam.
    - G2A.

    I personally find the G2A Goldmine affiliate program to be a bit lacking.

    Just my opinion.

    However, G2A itself is an invaluable resource.

    You can get legit savings on PC and console games. Oh, and software other than games.

    You'll already have a Steam account; included just in case.

    Free Mods.

    - NexusMods.

    Consoles.

    - Xbox One X.
    - Or, Xbox One S.

    - PS4 Pro.
    - PS4.

    To be truly obnoxious, get the X and the Pro.

    Although I joke a little, to go high end on your gaming channel?

    Get the Pro and the X if you can.

    It boils down to the end result of how your video looks.

    Even games not in 4K look crisper and play better (obviously).

    And even if you downscale 4K footage to 1080P (the norm here) your 1080P footage from 4K (for games that play in 4K) will still look crisper than regular 1080P recorded in 1080P.

    Console Accessories.

    Game Recording.

    - 4K60 PRO.
    - HD60 PRO.
    - Cam Link
    - Chat Link
    - Game Capture Software

    While not necessary, it doesn't hurt to have an external HDD, two controllers, and a 4K television for your consoles.

    The second controller? So your mum can be a studio guest.

    And tell your hard-earned COD audience that you peed the bed until you were 24.

    Camera.

    Basic Choices:

    - DSLR.
    - Mirrorless.
    - Compact.

    The obnoxious git recommendation?

    DSLR or Mirrorless.

    But compact (point-and-click) cameras have their place.

    Pros of compacts:

    - Small: slip in your pocket.
    - Cost: (relative terms) can be cheaper.
    - Fixed lens: less to worry about.
    - Big depth of field: foreground and background in focus (not always what you want, though).
    - Newbie-friendly: intuitive and user-friendly.
    - Functions: all the functions you'll need.

    Cons of compacts:

    - 4K: (usually) less 4K shooting duration.
    - Overheating: (often) overheating can be an issue.
    - Image Quality: less than DSLRs (though gap may not matter for you).
    - Upgrades: harder to evolve; no lens additions, fewer accessories.
    - Precision: less control over speed, aperture, etc.

    DSLR Suggestions:

    - Canon 70D.
    - Canon EOS 5D Mark IV.
    - Canon EOS REBEL T7i.

    Mirrorless Suggestions:

    - Sony A6500.
    - Sony A6300.
    - Sony a7S II.
    - Panasonic Lumix GH5.
    - Panasonic Lumix G7

    Compact Suggestions:

    - Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II.
    - Sony RX100 V.

    In the cases there without a flip-out LCD, you can tether your camera to a laptop (need the lead). Useful if you also vlog as well as stream. Only downside to the Sonys is Jelly Effect, but that's not an issue for a gamer, since you're not whipping around the camera to pan.

    Can We Be More Obnoxious? Always.

    That brings us to the end of Obnoxious Git.

    Can you be more of an obnoxious turd? Always


    You can be decidedly more obnoxious - and I'll probably beef up the list - but our list is still fairly obnoxious and includes necessary obnoxious tools.

    Semi-joking aside, the above gear will allow for high-end production on your gaming channel, and you can not only cover a wide range of games but also gaming platforms.

    I left out some popular consoles (like the Nintendo Switch) and retro game consoles, as well as omitting a bunch of other hardware that we could have looked at.

    Those and other tools I may add to the list in the future. The initial intention here is to give you tools for a more widely popular/ common setup.

    The Budget Creator.

    This time around we look at tech tools for the budget-conscious.

    Computer.

    - Desktop or Laptop.

    A desktop is generally considered better than a laptop for gaming. Myself, I use a desktop for gaming, video editing, 3D modelling, and any other demanding software or activities that can put a strain on a computer system, and I use a laptop (as I am now) for everything else.

    That said, when you're on a budget, just so long as the specs are up to par, you're good to go with either laptop or desktop. Just be aware that unless your laptop is high end, you'll get stuttering and lower FPS in-game (but you already know that; state the obvious, Tom).

    These are comfortable minimum specs:

    - I7
    - 16GM Ram.
    - 250 SSD.
    - 1TB HDD.
    - Nvidia 1060 (6GB)
    - Win 10.

    You can get away with an I5 (plenty of creators grew their channels on them) but I really wouldn't recommend it.

    The above rig will comfortably play on Medium and will struggle a little on High and Ultra.

    When I say struggle - you can probably play well enough, but when it comes time to edit, you're really going to notice every tiny little thing, and so will your audience.

    If you're modding, especially, I would recommend no more than 100 mods on that system (not graphic-intensive mods, either) and absolutely do not go over 200.

    That's a bit subjective (100 and 200), because it depends on the mods, but it's a fairly safe, general guideline.

    Desktop Accessories.

    Don't worry about pricey noise reduction or expensive mouse, keyboard, speakers, and monitor.

    If anything? Put your money into the mouse.

    If you can? Throw some money into whatever monitor you can afford.

    The mouse is (obviously) more important (when on a budget) because it directly impacts your ability when playing the games.

    Then we have external HDD and VR.

    Do you need them? Absolutely not, no.

    It depends on the size of your internal HDD, though. Give it a few months and you'll need an external HDD.

    You can always use cloud, I suppose, but I'm old school and I prefer to keep video footage on storage in the office.

    To save space, make sure you're junking your captured footage after use.

    (Just so long as you feel it absolutely won't be needed again.)

    (Saying that, I keep most of my footage; it's good for compilations.)

    Monitor.

    - Whatever you can afford.
    - Faster response times are better. (Signified by MS)

    Mouse.

    - Anything nice from Logitech.

    Keyboard.

    - Any halfway decent gamer keyboard.
    - Or any keyword.
    - Logitech is pretty decent.

    Speakers.

    - Anything by logitech.
    - Anything (sound is sound on a budget).

    VR Headset.

    - Forget this.

    External HDD.

    - Forget this (for now).

    Microphone.

    - Blue Yeti
    - Blue Snowball (Cheaper but Tinny)

    Noise Reduction.

    - Throw a blanket behind you. (It helps to literally blanket noise.)

    Software.

    Video Editing.

    - Shotcut (Free.)

    Image Editing.

    - GIMP (Free.)

    PC Game Recording.

    - GeForce Experience/ Shadowplay (Nvidia.) (Free.)
    - Open Broadcaster Software/ OBS Studio. (Free.)
    - Fraps. (Free & Paid.)

    Audio.

    - Audacity. (Free.)

    Gaming.

    - Steam. (Free to get account.)
    - G2A. ((Free to get account.)

    Free Mods.

    Same as last time - depending on your games, use the free mods on Nexusmods.

    (You probably already do?)

    Consoles.

    - Xbox One S.
    - Or, PS4.

    Console Accessories.

    Game Recording.

    I'll leave these as above. All are useful. Obviously, if you're not console gaming, it doesn't matter.

    - 4K60 PRO.
    - HD60 PRO.
    - Cam Link
    - Chat Link
    - Game Capture Software

    Camera.

    Buget Choices:

    - Second-Hand DSLR or Mirrorless.
    - 1080P/ 4K Compact.
    - Webcam.

    Webcam Suggestion:

    - Logitech HD Pro C920.

    Can We Be More Budget? Sure.

    This is the score.

    If you're on a budget, you can get started for even less than the above.

    I include the above because I'm trying to be thorough.

    Fact is, it obviously depends on your requirements.

    If you're playing something like Minecraft or Survival Craft 2 on a PC?

    You're not exactly going to need a killer rig.

    If you want to get started, and if you're on a tight as hell budget . . .

    Then this is what you need:

    (We're talking bare-buttock minimum requirements)

    - I5 Laptop/ Desktop
    - Nvidia
    - GeForce Experience.
    - Blue Snowball.
    - Shotcut.
    - Steam.
    - G2A
    - Audacity
    - GIMP

    If you want to take the console route?

    - I5 Laptop/ Desktop
    - Nvidia
    - GeForce Experience.
    - Blue Snowball.
    - Shotcut.
    - G2A
    - Audacity
    - GIMP
    - PS4/ XB 1 S
    - Basic Elgato


    Either of those solutions - Sir or Madam - will get you started.

    Obviously, you're not going to be rocking COD WWII on your PC.

    It'll get you started.

    The Tips.

    You have the tech tools. Now let me give you some tip tools.

    1. Commentating.

    Full stop: you are required to commentate your videos.



    So - at the very least - you need to lend voice-over to your videos.

    Some studios don't require it, but YouTube can consider it a breach of Fair Use, so you're best off adding at least audio commentary.

    2. Commercial-Use Rights.

    When you make a gaming video, what you're doing is using the assets owned by one or more game studios.

    You have 2 choices:

    1. Join a gaming network (MCN).
    2. Follow commercial-use rights.

    I may add gaming networks (otherwise known as multi-channel networks/ MCN) to this thread in the future. I don't recommend them so - for now - I'll leave them out of the equation.

    The best route - IMO - is the second option. This is debatable, I know; it's just my own preference/ experience. Without an MCN in the picture, whatever you earn is 100% your own, no contracts to sign (and argue over), no drama.

    Question is, how do you know if you can use a game for your channel?

    1. Find out the game studio behind the game.
    2. Go to their website.
    3. Find the commercial-use terms.

    Failing the above 1 to 3, just whack a search into YouTube:

    [name of game studio] youtube monetization

    Chances are fairly decent that you can use the game, but each studio has different terms and you need to follow them.

    Also, keep in mind that these terms can change at any time.

    Bonus Tip: Turn the music off in the game settings. These assets are often not owned by the game studio and you can get strikes.

    To get you started, let me just link you to some useful studio pages. This way you can get an idea of what you're looking for when you go searching for them yourself.

    Game Studios That Allow YouTube Monetization:

    1. Mojang. (Click "Commercial Usage Guidelines.)
    2. Bethesda Softworks.
    3. Valve.

    I may add to that list.

    Golden rule: don't take my word for it, because those 3 example pages above can change literally at the drop of a hat. Do your due diligence - research.

    3. Game Choice.

    This is vital when you start out.

    The first instinct? To play your favourite game.

    It could be a good idea. It probably isn't.

    1. Stick to one game initially.
    2. If possible select a new title that will explode in popularity.
    3. Find your niche in the game. Mods? Compilations? Etc.
    4. Cover new developments for it. Updates. DLC. Etc.

    A textbook example of a creator sticking to (primarily) one game: MrBossFTW.

    4. Brand & Collection.

    Make your channel look professional, give it character, and help it stand out.

    1. Brand cover art and profile.
    2. Brand your intro sequence.

    Expand your audience reach and collect that audience.

    1. Branch out from YouTube into Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.
    2. Have a strong presence on Reddit.
    3. Collect followers.
    4. Collect email subscribers.

    You can make intro videos in Adobe After Effects, but the cheaper, low-tech option is to pay for one on Fiverr.

    5. Streaming.

    To stream or not to stream?

    1. Get experience with publishing before streaming.
    2. Stream (related to 1) at peek times in North America.
    3. Use stream footage for publishing.

    6. Routine.

    YouTube and audiences reward you for regular publishing.

    1. Decide on a publishing routine.
    2. State it on your channel (days of the week).
    3. Stick to it.

    7. Intros.

    1. Grab your audience.
    2. Seek engagement.
    3. Brand.

    8. Outros.

    1. Promotion.
    2. Seek engagement.
    3. Encourage further viewing of your content.

    9. Reddit.

    1. Post on Reddit a lot.
    2. Follow the 1 to 10 Reddit rule.
    3. Share your videos.

    10. Monetization.


    You won't get onto the YouTube Partner Program overnight.

    And so? Squeeze money out of your channel from the get-go.

    1. Affiliate Marketing - games, hardware.
    2. Patreon - regular sponsorship.
    3. Merchandise - when you have brand loyalty, use it (store).
    4. Endorsements - when available, consider them.

    A word on endorsements.

    Don't accept the first deal thrown your way.

    They're almost never good and lock you into a contract you won't enjoy.

    Be selective.

    You don't need endorsement.

    If you get a contract?

    1. Google other people who have the similar/ same contract.
    2. Run it by family and friends.
    3. Have a lawyer give it a look.

    Most endorsement offers that come your way won't be under contract.

    These are going to be other marketers looking for promotion in your videos.

    1. Follow sponsorship rules on YouTube.
    2. Consider what your audience will think.
    3. Your audience comes first (because it's hard to earn and easy to lose).

    Don't Be Shy . . .
    Show Me Your Tool.



    I am . . . keen . . . to see your tool.

    Whip out your tool or - if you have multiple tools?

    Show me all your tools.

    As I say above, I'll probably add more tools. For now - enjoy!

    Cheers,

    Tom
    Great post with tons of valuable information but do not forget about Twitch TV which is huge for gamers.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
      Originally Posted by DURABLEOILCOM View Post

      Great post with tons of valuable information but do not forget about Twitch TV which is huge for gamers.
      Thanks, mate! 100% agree. I have mental notes on a Twitch thread that I'd like to create, but anyone thinking of getting into gaming (you're right to bring it up) should not overlook Twitch.

      Cheers,

      Tom
      Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams


    Coffee? Check.
    Itchy Testicle? Check.

    Morning, lads.

    Just waking up here. Drinking some testicle and scratching a coffee.

    Wait.

    No.

    Reverse that.

    Someone Say Buttocks?
    Probably Addams.

    Someone talked buttocks earlier.

    They also talked game choice:

    Originally Posted by Tom Addams

    3. Game Choice.

    This is vital when you start out.

    The first instinct? To play your favourite game.

    It could be a good idea. It probably isn't.

    1. Stick to one game initially.
    2. If possible select a new title that will explode in popularity.
    3. Find your niche in the game. Mods? Compilations? Etc.
    4. Cover new developments for it. Updates. DLC. Etc.

    A textbook example of a creator sticking to (primarily) one game: MrBossFTW.
    Whilst I suck down the first coffee of the day - splash of 3 Smirnoff bottles - I'm going to expand.

    I won't be expanding a great deal.

    Nothing to write home about.

    Nothing to get excited about.

    Two or three inches.

    Shameful really.

    Playing With Yourself?
    Let 'Em Watch.

    This is what I think.

    If you're going to play with yourself?

    May as well let people watch.

    That in mind? Before you can start playing, you need a game.

    (And a lock on the door.)

    Right.

    Joe? Over here, mate. Come on, don't be shy.


    Good man.

    Joe here? First name Joe? Last name Gamer?

    Joe Gamer - a newbie creator - has just setup his very first gaming channel on YouTube. He's a 26 year-old plumber from Brighton. In his spare time, he likes to laugh, have fun, take long walks on the beach, and impersonate either Ed Sheeran or Tom Selleck at funerals.

    Joe? Tell the lads what you play with in your bedroom.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Do I have to?
    Yes yes, come on, don't keep us waiting.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    It's not as if I do it all the time.
    Well, you should.

    Tip Tool #6, and I quote:

    Originally Posted by Tom Addams

    YouTube and audiences reward you . . .
    Do you not wish to be rewarded?

    For playing with yourself?

    Regularly?

    Playing with yourself?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    So I should do it more often?
    Well, that depends. How often do you do it now?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    'Bout 12 hours a day. More on weekends.
    You should be ashamed, man.

    A mere 12 hours?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Sorry.
    How do you expect to get good at it?

    If you don't do it more often?

    Good at it?

    Often?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    I just find it hard, that's all.
    I should bloody well hope so!

    No fun if it isn't hard.

    For at least 47 seconds at a time.

    What game are you playing?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    GTA 5.
    Just a second.

    You find GTA 5 hard?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Well, no, not the game. It's hard to fit in more time. Than 12 hours a day. I mean.
    Look.

    It's all about time management, isn't it?

    I'm playing with myself right now.

    As we chat.

    Playing with myself.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    I feel a bit of a pillock now.
    I don't mean to be harsh.

    Trying to help you here.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    What is it, Minecraft or something?
    Sorry?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    You know, you're playing with yourself as we chat. Minecraft?
    Oh!

    Right!

    Yes!

    Minecraft.

    47 Seconds Later.
    Roughly Speaking.


    Right.

    Where was I?

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    You turned on your camera and showed-
    That's right!

    You were going to tell the lads about playing GTA 5 in your bedroom.

    Out with it.

    Whip it out, man.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Okay, so, GTA 5, right?
    Right, right.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Top game, yeah?
    Yes, yes, top, yes.

    Originally Posted by Joe Gamer

    Play it, don't I? For me channel. Play it.
    Superb!

    Now, just to somewhat expand on what Joe has told us, we're going to imagine, just for a moment, that Joe has - this very second - received a gargantuan boost to his IQ. He now has the brain . . . of a banana.

    This is what Joe would probably say:

    Originally Posted by Joe "Banana" Gamer

    Will you stop looking at me like that? Not my fault I'm shaped like a Golden Retriever's willy.
    After which . . . he would certainly say . . . this:

    Originally Posted by Joe "Banana" Gamer

    So, yeah, been playing GTA 5 for years, haven't I? Tons of top channels for it too, right? MrBossFTW? VanossGaming? Prestige Clips? So, yeah, made me channel about GTA 5. Cashing in, obvs.
    Which - obviously - teaches us two things.

    Thing One: Bananas are bad-tempered gits.

    Thing Two: Some gamers, starting a new YouTube channel, will select their game based on their familiarity and enjoyment of it, coupled with wider audience popularity.

    If you're going to play with yourself?

    And you absolutely should.

    With regularity.

    Play . . . properly.

    How Tom . . ..
    Plays With Himself.

    First, am I suggesting that you avoid GTA 5?

    No.

    Earlier, I talked about The Long Road.

    If you select a game like GTA 5?

    Long-running game?

    Lots of competition?

    Loyal channel audiences?

    It will - almost certainly - be a long road for you.

    So this is what I suggest.

    The most important piece of advice I can offer you is to select the right game.

    Not the left.

    The right.

    And you want to select that game before . . . it even releases.

    Consider MrBossFTW.

    What game do you think that he will try to dominate next?

    ?

    That's right, good sir.

    1. Stay updated on upcoming games.

    2. Publish content for that game well before release.

    3. If not upcoming games? Target brand new games.

    4. Game must have potential for long-term content creation.

    5. Game should have potential for long-term popularity.

    6. The studio must obviously give commercial-use rights.

    7. Will it/ can it be modded? Helps to increase long-term popularity.

    8. Will it/ is it likely to have DLC and updates? Also aids long-term popularity.

    9. Is it a franchise? Strong in-built audience? Long-term use of previous titles? Not necessary, but those help.

    10. Multi-player included with single player? Straight multi-player? DLC? In-games purchases? Those can (can) fuel audience demand for content.

    What I would strongly recommend you do is study the top gaming channels.

    But study wisely.

    1. Look at which games they focus on.

    2. Look at which upcoming games they mention.

    Those two things - coupled with the above 10 points - will help you select the right game.

    Now excuse me.

    Time to play with myself.

    Cheers,

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
    That is one epic post ... Gonna PDF it and give it to my son ... he's curious about being a Youtube gamer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gronie
    Hey Tom.
    Nice share thanks a lot, I will show this to my brother who begins the adventure with youtube. I'm sure this guide will help him.
    Thanks!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author anayb
    Such posts require significant time and efforts. I really appreciate it! lots of good info about hardware, Tom.

    In fact, I have never used a laptop in life. People may laugh. I have a Corei7, which I have been using for a couple of years. Now, its time to switch to Xeon Phi 8920, which has 72 cores and 240 GB of RAM. The software I am working on needs tremendous amounts of computing power.
    Signature
    Do you need an exclusive video product?
    Graphics Design - Motion Graphics - 2D & 3D Animation - Video Editing - Color Grading - Logo Animation - etc
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  • Profile picture of the author pbshandilya
    for gaming purpose it's mandatory to your computer have good graphics card more than 4GB RAM and 1000GB hard disk. then you use to game in a system
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  • Profile picture of the author cearionmarie
    Very detailed guide! Thanks for sharing. I only have a 1050Ti, it plays decent games but can play the more heavier ones.
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    Cearion Uy - Marketing Advisor
    www.influencerauditor.com

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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Great post. Never knew someone knew so much about marketing on Youtube - in the gamer sector. Tom you are definitely a PRO.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    WOW.

    Thanks a lot for the positive and kind words. Each comment ROCKS. You totally made my week. Thank you!

    Would anyone like me to cover more tip tools? Just let me know.

    I have a few tech tools to add (I can't believe I forgot to include a mouse pad! Silly git, Tom). If you'd like me to cover other related areas or go more in-depth (as I did with game choice) feel free to let me know here.

    Thanks a lot!

    Cheers,

    Tom

    P.S: To the son - make sure Dad spoils you, mate!
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    Update.

    Good morn, ladies.

    We have a tools update (see original post).

    - Headset.
    - Mouse.
    - Mouse Mat.
    - Face Light.


    Cheers,

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams


    [ SEQUEL ]
    Good morn'!

    Since whacking together this thread of YouTube gamer tips, 397 marketers have contacted me (well, 2 marketers) to ask me the same question.

    Question, Tom?

    This question:

    Tom! Will you send me a twerking video?
    As well as THIS QUESTION:

    Can I have more help with game choice?
    It cannot be stressed enough. Game choice? Vital. You can literally build a business with a single game.

    But it needs to be the right game.

    Well, this morning I'm going to briefly expand (expand my briefs?) on my previous game choice tips.

    We'll be looking at (IMO) the very BEST TOOL to help you calculate the right game to focus on.

    First, THIS:
    [ ONE ]


    One game or multiple games?

    Jacksepticeye covers multiple games, as does Markiplier, DanTDM too, and let's not forget CaptainSparklez, and -.

    Well, you get the idea.

    This is the deal: they can AFFORD to cover multiple games.

    BUT:

    You have a new channel. Competition is rough.

    So what am I saying? You need to find a niche?

    You need to find a niche or (better) a micro-niche.

    The absolute best way to find a hole (in a very competitive gaming market) is to go after a micro-niche. This is typically expressed in terms like so:

    1. One Game.
    2. One Type of Video FOR That Game.

    It boils down to 2 things:

    1. Search Ranking.
    2. Audience.

    You need to go after long-tails. But just having a single video ranking for a certain topic is not going to get you decent exposure (usually). You need to find weak terms and flood the result pages with your videos.

    The absolute most DOABLE METHOD is to target a single game and a single type of video FOR that game. Think of all the games. Think of all the types of video. Let's Play? Modding? Funny compilations? How-Tos/ Tips/ Tricks?

    Some of the biggest YouTube gamers built their channels by covering just one game apiece. Aside from the SEO benefit of dominating your weak long-tails, audiences tend to really appreciate the single focus.

    How so, Tom? Well, think of yourself. You're a gamer, right? What gamer channels do you watch? I'd be willing to bet my capuchin monkeyservant that some of those channels specialise in your favourite games.

    What draws you to those channels? Well, for a start, you're watching videos of your favourite games. It's fun, isn't it? So - reason one - audiences tune in because they have FUN. Second reason?

    Second one - EDUCATION. If you play GTA: O and a new DLC drops, what are you going to do? Fork out the cash and grab that new apartment (that comes with a TV shaped like a pair of golden buttocks) or are you going to learn BEFORE you buy?

    Exactly.

    Here, some examples of gamers who mostly focus on a single game:

    1. MrBossFTW.
    2. Ali-A.
    3. SkyDoesMinecraft
    4. Cizzorz.

    You and I could add hundreds to that list, right off the top of our heads.

    Last word, then: my advice?

    1. Choose One Game.
    2. Focus on MCs Within That Game.

    Now for THIS:
    [ BOOKMARK ]
    What's the best tool in this thread?

    Hands down, this one:

    Let's Play Index.

    1. Bookmark that page.
    2. Study that page.
    3. Return to it often.

    What is it?

    It shows weekly views for games on YouTube.

    That is the single most useful tool in the thread so far.

    When you choose your game, what is the most important decision to make? There are lots of decisions (do you like it? does the game have mileage? potential MCs?), but what's the biggest reason to choose?

    VIEWERS WANNA VIEW!

    At the time of writing, Fortnite has 190,015,533. That, right there? The hardest trending game on Planet Rock. This is why you're seeing some channels specialise ONLY on Fortnite.

    The trick isn't to necessarily choose the game with THE MOST VIEWS. Look at my earlier game choice elements. The biggest factor in the decision is VIEWS. Are you choosing a game that's about to fall off the rankings? (Example: Far Cry 4.) Are you choosing an up-and-comer (the best choice) or one with enough views (and potential future views) to make the choice a solid one? Right now is still a good choice to jump on Fortnite, but just keep in mind the other choice elements. You don't have to necessarily shoot for a game with the most views. It just needs to have sufficient views (coupled with everything else) to make the game a worthwhile investment of your time, cash, and energies.

    Study that list. HARD.

    Cheers,

    Tom

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