First Post - Need Help With Decision

by Stu48
43 replies
Hi Everyone!

I've been reading the posts here for a bit and thought that some of you could help me with a major decision regarding my direction.

I have two online business ideas but I can't decide which one to pursue. I don't want to try both because I think that one has to give their all and focus on one thing in order to be successful. I know both will take quite a bit of marketing, especially with social media.

Also, I want to choose the best one that will provide me with a solid long term business.

Okay. Here are my choices...

1. Online Educational Consulting
Not to brag, but I have some pretty good credentials in the education field. I was thinking about doing some online/telephone/email consulting. I will be able to help parents help their child from kindergarten to high school with regards to getting better grades, behavior, social skills, parenting, and anything academic. I would also put up some Amazon affiliate links to educational books, games, apps, etc.

I like this ideas because I am an expert in this field and I can easily demonstrate that. The major drawback is that most of my income will have to be traded for my time (with the exception of some affiliate sales).

2. T Shirt Business
I currently have around 100 unique t shirt designs and can make many more. I was thinking about putting my designs on all the major online POD sites (Zazzle, Teespring, Spreadshirt, etc) and using those designs on all products (t shirts, mugs, hoodies, etc). I have an original brand already so I won't just be printing random t shirts.

I like this idea because there can be some passive income later on. It is also an asset. The major obstacle I see is that there is tons of competition. It might be hard to stand out.

So, if anyone has any insight that can help direct me I would appreciate it.

Thanks.

Stu
#decision #post
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  • Profile picture of the author AffiliatePrograms
    Those do not sound like good choices. The idea is to make money moonlighting until you can afford to switch full time away from "time for money" and to something other than your regular gig. It sounds like your regular gig is supposed to be the education stuff. That's what you know, and that's what you have reason to have some confidence about. You should try to make a living with your education stuff now first, unless you have money to burn, and then spend as much time as you are able on other avenues that might some day enable you to ditch that. The t shirt angle just sounds far too uncertain now, except for spending some time on it outside your main gig as you are able.

    How did you get 100 unique designs, by the way? Are you also a designer?
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    • Profile picture of the author Stu48
      Thanks for the input. I'm not looking to quit my job, rather I want a sizeable side income.

      I created my designs by purchasing designs on creative market and then using Photoshop to alter them to my brand.
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      • Profile picture of the author AffiliatePrograms
        Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

        Thanks for the input. I'm not looking to quit my job, rather I want a sizeable side income.

        I created my designs by purchasing designs on creative market and then using Photoshop to alter them to my brand.
        Okay, that clarifies. Then yes - the education stuff is out. Anything involving time for money on top of your job is out, if your job is full time. The t shirt option is your choice then, plus see the pm I just sent you.

        Also, regarding what you said about purchasing designs, where did you do that and where can I do that if I wanted to purchase designs and modify them the way you've done?
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        • Profile picture of the author Deniafebake
          He mentioned purchasing designs on creative market, there are a few free designs as well. Canva is also a good place to get designs, there are a number of free beautiful designs, and some you can purchase.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve B
          Originally Posted by AffiliatePrograms View Post

          ... regarding what you said about purchasing designs, where did you do that and where can I do that if I wanted to purchase designs and modify them the way you've done?

          Anyone can do that very easily. There are thousands and thousands of designs readily available. You simply go to the stock image sites and purchase a license that allows you to use the images you license for resale on t-shirts and other items. Then you use your graphic skills (or hire someone) to modify them to your heart's content. The real challenge is in making designs that others want and selling them over and over every day to lots of buyers.

          Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Deniafebake
    Since you have a job, which is probably in line with your pretty good credentials, you should probably go for the t-shirt. I mean a 100 designs? That's pretty remarkable, and it shows that you are really interested in designing, perhaps as a hobby. And people will always wear t- shirts. About the competition, don't worry, if your design stands out, with time, your brand will be recognized.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

    So, if anyone has any insight that can help direct me I would appreciate it.

    Stu,

    I always suggest that people starting businesses online begin by identifying demand in the marketplace. You need to verify that there is a compelling need or desire by people with money to purchase what you are going to offer. Market research will help you to know what that demand looks like, where you can find potential prospects, and what competition you'll face in the niche.

    If you skip this step, you are only guessing about how you should position your business, what you should sell, and where you should go to find your best prospects/customers. "Guessing" and profitable business usually aren't compatible.

    Good luck,

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Steve,

    Yes. that makes sense.

    Ok, so where do I begin? Do I start both sites and see if there is any demand?

    I don't yet know how many people will like my t shirts nor how many parents will want my services.

    Where to start?
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    • Profile picture of the author noAnge1
      what are the sites? sorry if they are already included.
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

    Hi Everyone!

    I've been reading the posts here for a bit and thought that some of you could help me with a major decision regarding my direction.

    I have two online business ideas but I can't decide which one to pursue. I don't want to try both because I think that one has to give their all and focus on one thing in order to be successful. I know both will take quite a bit of marketing, especially with social media.

    Also, I want to choose the best one that will provide me with a solid long term business.

    Okay. Here are my choices...

    1. Online Educational Consulting
    Not to brag, but I have some pretty good credentials in the education field. I was thinking about doing some online/telephone/email consulting. I will be able to help parents help their child from kindergarten to high school with regards to getting better grades, behavior, social skills, parenting, and anything academic. I would also put up some Amazon affiliate links to educational books, games, apps, etc.

    I like this ideas because I am an expert in this field and I can easily demonstrate that. The major drawback is that most of my income will have to be traded for my time (with the exception of some affiliate sales).

    2. T Shirt Business
    I currently have around 100 unique t shirt designs and can make many more. I was thinking about putting my designs on all the major online POD sites (Zazzle, Teespring, Spreadshirt, etc) and using those designs on all products (t shirts, mugs, hoodies, etc). I have an original brand already so I won't just be printing random t shirts.

    I like this idea because there can be some passive income later on. It is also an asset. The major obstacle I see is that there is tons of competition. It might be hard to stand out.

    So, if anyone has any insight that can help direct me I would appreciate it.

    Thanks.

    Stu
    Can your consulting skills be turned into an info product? I bet you answer many of the same questions over and over, don't you? You can leverage your knowledge by turning it into video, audio, or specialized reports which don't require you exchanging hours for dollars. In fact, you can do it once, and have it fulfilled by a third party, like Kunaki for example and that keeps your time free.

    Can you train someone to answer follow-up questions or simply dictate answers and have it transcribed into a report.

    I don't see the need to choose one over the other, if you can leverage both.

    Education is as Evergreen as a market gets, no end to the PARADE of people who will need your knowledge, the question is, can you serve this market via books, courses, trainings which don't involve you, or which you can do once and sell for years to come?

    Tee shirts, also evergreen, but if you want to make a dent, you need something unique.

    Consider the fall mid-term elections. Can you come up with a design or two for both parties? Could you sell red tees and blue tees as a fundraiser? Can you capture some business from the millions of dollars which will be spent on elections? Can you add a nice hat to the TEE shirt, maybe buy one, get the other thing half off?

    Look down the road to special events, I've got several promotions ready for next year's 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Can you create a design for this? Or for any upcoming event?

    Can you create a meme, from current events? You need a long term strategy to build your TEE shirt business, one back end is to offer additional specialty printing items via an affiliate program like the one Kaeser-Blair (no affiliation) offers?

    I urge you to give yourself some time and flesh out your ideas, both can be profitable for you and you can build both in your spare time.

    I agree with SteveB about the DEMAND, albeit, you have chosen two niches which are evergreen in their demand. Take a look at making your educational tools available without your direct contact, if possible, and focus on big events, or fads, for your T-shirt business.

    GordonJ
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Gordon,

    Thanks for taking the time to help out.

    You provided me with some good ideas. Your education ideas are good, but as an insider in that niche, I feel that a personalized service is a better recipe for success.

    As far as the t shirts go, your idea about capitalizing on fads etc..is definitely a good idea. My brand is already unique and I think that it's the direction I must take in order to stand out and be different. I don't think I want to compete with everyone else who is jumping on the t shirt 'fad' bandwagon.

    Your ideas have given me some other ideas.

    Thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

      Gordon,

      Thanks for taking the time to help out.

      You provided me with some good ideas. Your education ideas are good, but as an insider in that niche, I feel that a personalized service is a better recipe for success.

      As far as the t shirts go, your idea about capitalizing on fads etc..is definitely a good idea. My brand is already unique and I think that it's the direction I must take in order to stand out and be different. I don't think I want to compete with everyone else who is jumping on the t shirt 'fad' bandwagon.

      Your ideas have given me some other ideas.

      Thanks
      Here are a couple of fast start ideas. For education. ONE page web site which gives away a report on your expertise, whatever it is. DON'T make them sign up, just a link to a download, a simple PDF file which answers the top 14 to 20 questions they may want to ask you.

      Dictate this, send it off to REV or find a transcriptionist and you have a very fast report to offer. Chances are you can answer most questions off the top of your head. At the end of the report, you offer them two choices, one is to get ONE of their pressing questions answered, the other to OPT in to any future information you have. Most will take you up on both, if they find you via targeted ads, like facebook groups or other educational groups you already participate in.

      This reads more complicated than it actually is, come up with 10 questions, answer them, you could use Google Docs, and speak your answers and with some editing, you have your first report in an hour or two. FAST. Get eyeballs by using your educational connections as they are today, and see what happens.

      As for T's, offer a contest, best slogan for mid term elections for both parties, winner gets a free tee, or maybe a few of them. You could collect their names and as time approaches, maybe have a list, and offer your tees to them...OR, run a start-up campaign on one of the crowd funding sites and offer the tees as a gift.

      Lots of ways to get started quickly and test out the demand for what you have. Just keep it simple and use existing tools to save yourself time until you have a better plan in place then you can execute it with confidence it is built on results of your testing. Eh?

      GordonJ
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Thanks Gordon!

    Some really good stuff here I can implement.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Gordon gave you excellent advice. You don't need to pick one and go all-in from the start.

    You see those "burn the boats and go for it" stories, but you never hear about the ones that burn the boats and get slaughtered because they had no escape plan.

    Contrast that with testing the waters by offering minimal products that you can create quickly, test quickly, and evaluate quickly.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    John,

    I agree. Minimal products that can be created quickly, tested quickly, and evaluated quickly seems to be the logical approach.

    Here's my question though,...

    Don't minimal products that are created quickly undermine the potential quality of my service or product? What is the potential buyer's perception of the quality of service or product I have to offer if they see something that was minimally and quickly produced?

    I get it. I need to test the waters. But isn't that a double edged sword?

    Stu
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

      John,

      I agree. Minimal products that can be created quickly, tested quickly, and evaluated quickly seems to be the logical approach.

      Here's my question though,...

      Don't minimal products that are created quickly undermine the potential quality of my service or product? What is the potential buyer's perception of the quality of service or product I have to offer if they see something that was minimally and quickly produced?

      I get it. I need to test the waters. But isn't that a double edged sword?

      Stu
      Stu, it can be if you let it.

      One way around it is to offer top-notch, incredible service, but limit the scope of the service. If you explain to people that this is a new venture and that, while you are expert at providing the service itself, you are still entering a new way of providing that service.

      In your OP, you wrote:

      I will be able to help parents help their child from kindergarten to high school with regards to getting better grades, behavior, social skills, parenting, and anything academic.
      This is so broad that most parents will have a tough time believing in you, especially when you first launch. For a minimal product in this area, you could pick one specific problem area and age group, and offer your services to those parents

      Maybe it's just the way you worded things, but one of the items that caught my eye was being able to help kids with parenting. I think you meant helping the parents with parenting, but this is a problem as written. Suppose you developed a program for young women who have children while still in high school? That's something very specific you could easily target.

      Another possibility would be specific help for preparing for college entrance exams. I know there's competition, but you could set yourself apart as offering customized attention, rather than a corporate one-size-fits-all approach.

      Even if these completely bombed, you'd have data to work with for the next attempt without poisoning the well by trying to burst on the scene fully formed.

      Long story short, with services a minimal product doesn't have to be a scaled down version of the service. It could simply be a scaled down approach to the market served.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Great points John!

    Thanks!

    Yes, I should have caught that 'kids parenting' thing.
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  • Profile picture of the author AffiliatePrograms
    Thanks everyone for giving me tips on that design stuff. A bit embarrassed to admit, but I was not aware "creative market" was an actual thing, but I see now it is a site.

    Stu, as you continue your journey through life, remember that your thread was lingering in a state of neglect and sliding down the page for hours til I stepped first.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Hi Stu,

    Which business idea do you feel more passionate about?

    What would you do for no money, with a stronger pull toward one or the other?

    That's your answer.

    Both seem to be viable, problem solving ideas.

    Forget any idea of competition; this like all fear-based stuff sprouts from the mind, and should be ignored.

    Ryan
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    • Profile picture of the author Stu48
      Passion?

      Definitely the t-shirt business. I've been in education for over 20 years.
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  • Profile picture of the author cearionmarie
    Hello Stu,

    It's always a good thing to have multiple sources when it comes to income, and keeping both your business is something that can be done. Big brands and big names have multiple business, and sure it's something you can also do. It could be challenging but not impossible. You can consider hiring someone to manage the t shirt business and just oversee everything at the end of the day, or week.
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    • Profile picture of the author Stu48
      Thanks Cearionmarie,

      I agree, multiple sources of income are always a good idea.

      I already have a pretty good full time career. I want to jump in, start, and develop something on my own. Having someone else manage it for me sounds like more headaches, especially when I feel confident doing a better job on my own.

      Thanks for the insight though.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Ok..here's my first update.

    It know, it's ONLY been a week but I want to share what I've done so others can learn from me.

    So, I started BOTH ideas.

    I set up an education site with about 50 original articles/tips on a variety of education topics. I created Facebook and Twitter accounts and have reached out to friends and colleagues. No bites yet of any kind (as expected so early) and some sharing on social media of my articles. I am still in the midst of setting up the consulting part of my site. I also found it easy to set up some affiliate links. For example, I have an article about helping a primary student with basic math skills. So, I gave about 10 unique ways to help in my 1500 word article. In one of my 10 ways, I suggested a very popular math workbook on Amazon with the affiliate link included.

    Then, I began to upload 10 t shirt designs on one of the major platforms. It is more work than I thought because for each design, there are about 15 or so products. So, I am in the midst of this task and it takes longer than I anticipated. That is, for each product, I create the tags etc, upload image, and then upload to facebook, instagram, and pinterest. Many likes so far on instagram, some visits to my store (it's on one of the POD sites), but no bites yet. Obviously too early.

    So, I'm finding both ventures interesting and there's quite a learning curve for both. I'm having more fun with the t shirt gig but the education one is much easier since I know my stuff.

    At this point, I have a feeling that the education site will be easier to initially get visitors than the t shirt business. But, I know that I can create tons of products with the t shirts and once they are up, they're up.

    One last point of interest...I noticed that the education site gives me a sense of control, since it's my site and I can do what I want. Whereas the t shirt business, I feel somewhat dependent on the pod site. Maybe that will change when I get to uploading my designs on the 6 major sites I intend to join.

    FYI - I am here to learn and to help others learn. I am not selling anything here nor will I in the future.

    Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author IGotMine
    I always suggest that people starting businesses online begin by identifying demand in the marketplace.
    When was the last time novelty Tees were not in demand?
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    I agree. I think that t shirts can be placed under 'evergreen', regardless of the type of t shirt.

    As for demand, I also think that all kinds of tees are in demand whether the category is 'dogs', 'quotes', 'memes', 'nature', 'vintage', etc...
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    An interesting observation...

    Okay, so I signed up with Redbubble, Zazzle, and Spreadshirt. So far, I have been able to use these sites, upload my designs, and use their images on my social media channels.

    About an hour ago, I received an email from one of these companies, stating that one of my designs was a duplicate and could not be accepted. Well, this can't be true. My designs are pretty much originals. So I thoroughly scanned the site for a duplicate, but couldn't find anything remotely similar to my design.

    This leaves me with a mildly bitter taste in my mouth. You see, after going through this, I realized that I don't have much control of 'my' product because I am using these print on demand sites.

    What if for some reason one of these sites decides to close my account?

    Or what if they tell me I can't sell a bunch of designs, especially my best sellers?

    This doesn't sit well with me. I don't think that either of these cases will happen, but, the thought does linger in the back of my mind.

    Is it stupid to depend on someone else's platform to run your business?

    I guess the same could be said for being an Amazon affiliate. I've read about people who have had their accounts banned. I'm sure some people deserved it, but there might be others who didn't.

    Now the educational consulting is looking more promising. I wouldn't have to rely on any company. I just have to rely on myself.

    Any thoughts?
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    • Profile picture of the author Gambino
      Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

      What if for some reason one of these sites decides to close my account?

      Or what if they tell me I can't sell a bunch of designs, especially my best sellers?

      This doesn't sit well with me. I don't think that either of these cases will happen, but, the thought does linger in the back of my mind.

      Is it stupid to depend on someone else's platform to run your business?

      I guess the same could be said for being an Amazon affiliate. I've read about people who have had their accounts banned. I'm sure some people deserved it, but there might be others who didn't.

      Now the educational consulting is looking more promising. I wouldn't have to rely on any company. I just have to rely on myself.

      Any thoughts?
      Unfortunately, that's part of the risk you take if you build your house on someone else's property. They could take adverse action against you any time they want. Now, typically speaking, there's a catch 22 because the platforms you're using are incentivized by having successful clients paying for their services. There's no incentive to want you to fail. I would worry more about it if I had a fulfillment by Amazon business when amazon has all the data or your business and customers and could render you obsolete overnight. I wouldn't worry about it as much with these companies.

      The more control you have of your business - the better.

      Many moons ago I ran a mildly successful t-shirt brand. It's not something that I would be eager to do again. The typical t-shirt falls within the $17-24 range which requires quite a few sales to make a decent income.

      Personally, I would be more intrigued by the opportunities for educators. I know a teacher that makes nearly her salary on sites like TeachersPayTeachers, which is truly passive. I think there's a lot of opportunity in the education space, not only in parents wanting the best for the kids but for other educators looking to make their lives easier.
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      • Profile picture of the author Stu48
        Thanks Gambino!

        I agree with what you are saying.

        I already have a handful of items on TPT...I do okay with it. It's quite competitive (isn't everything) and I don't seem to have the interest to keep up with it. That's also putting one's eggs in one basket.

        You stated that t shirts were about $17-24...well, on the POD sites, the earnings are only about $1-3 per shirt. After taxes, well, that's a joke.

        I would have to sell about 5000 t shirts on these sites in order for it to be worth my time. I'm still going to continue though as I'm not sure where this will take me. I'm cautiously optimistic.
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        • Profile picture of the author Gambino
          Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

          You stated that t shirts were about $17-24...well, on the POD sites, the earnings are only about $1-3 per shirt. After taxes, well, that's a joke.
          I dealt with t-shirts about 10 years ago, back before POD was a thing (or at least a thing I knew about). I would buy shirts and sell them for about 50% margins and I thought $10.00 or so from each shirt was pitiful. But, I still would have thought POD would have better margins.

          I think you'll stumble across something with better margins with more experience. Best of luck!
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by Gambino View Post

            I dealt with t-shirts about 10 years ago, back before POD was a thing (or at least a thing I knew about). I would buy shirts and sell them for about 50% margins and I thought $10.00 or so from each shirt was pitiful. But, I still would have thought POD would have better margins.

            I think you'll stumble across something with better margins with more experience. Best of luck!
            I looked into the POD shirt business awhile ago, and from what I saw, this business is similar to the way most freelancers approach things. Since there's no real barrier to entry, and most who enter have little talent or passion for design, the only thing left to compete on is price. So, like most of the freelance sites, it's a race to the bottom.

            In your day, one had to buy the shirts and then sell them, thus putting up at least one barrier to entry.
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            • Profile picture of the author Stu48
              Well said.

              I think I am now leaning towards my education concept. There is less competition and a much higher barrier to entry.

              Thanks for the observation.
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  • Profile picture of the author DripRevenue
    To me, print on demand can be a volatile and short term business model. Depending on what niche you go into, it can be difficult to sell products. What happens when you burn through all of those designs? You constantly have to come up with new designs and ideas and who knows if it will take off. If you don't come up with something new, your products could burn out on social media or any other platform you are running ads on and you may see a drop in ad performance. Another thing you have to worry about is people coming in and stealing your design or idea. Even if you have your design branded doesn't mean that the person can come up with their own design based on yours. All they have to do is change up the wording and the overall context of the design.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    DripRevenue,

    I've actually thought of that. Thanks for reinforcing the idea. I have about 90-100 designs and I was concerned how I could get more. Now, I could learn to make them myself, so that's not a burning issue. What was a concern was that someone would come up with a 'better' design than I have. I understand that the market works that way.

    Now, a better business model, for me, or anyone else for that matter, is one where I can continue to produce and my product/service would be hard to replicate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    Ok...

    Here's a great explanation of what I was eluding to...

    https://www.copyblogger.com/digital-sharecropping/

    I'm rethinking this t shirt thang. There's no way I want to print my own t shirts and distribute them...too much of a headache. Not sure if I want to 'sharecrop' (see linked article) on the POD sites...
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    • Profile picture of the author Gambino
      Originally Posted by Stu48 View Post

      Ok...

      Here's a great explanation of what I was eluding to...

      https://www.copyblogger.com/digital-sharecropping/

      I'm rethinking this t shirt thang. There's no way I want to print my own t shirts and distribute them...too much of a headache. Not sure if I want to 'sharecrop' (see linked article) on the POD sites...
      The thing about it is that all of these platforms (POD sites, Facebook, Google, etc) have a vested interest in having successful clients. To me, the biggest concern would be putting in the time and effort to ultimately generate $1-3 per sale. I view this the same way I view amazon affiliates and Google Adsense - not worth the time when compared to other options.

      A few years ago, I sold a very successful site because 100% of the traffic and sales came from Google. Google has been known to change their algorithm and render businesses obsolete overnight. And I had (and still have) a very limited understanding of SEO. So, I got out.

      Fast forward to today, and nearly 100% of my traffic and sales originate from Facebook. And even with Facebooks current issues, I'm not worried about it at all. I'm fairly certain that even if Facebook were to crumble, there will always be some sort of PPC/social network that will be able to drive traffic.

      What I would be very worried about is being a FBA seller. Amazon has shown the desire to create their own brands and has the ability to create the brands they want, manufacture/private label the products and put people out of business. I believe that will happen more and more over the next few years.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stu48
    To me, the biggest concern would be putting in the time and effort to ultimately generate $1-3 per sale.
    This is my biggest concern as well. I can't imagine the effort it must take to even sell 1000 t shirts, only to make $2000 and then pay almost half in taxes. I'm sure the time it would take to sell 1000 t shirts (ie designing, promoting) would not be worth the $1200 or so I would make.

    The thing about it is that all of these platforms (POD sites, Facebook, Google, etc) have a vested interest in having successful clients
    I have found quite a few situations online whereby people have had their accounts suddenly cancelled by Redbubble and other POD sites. Sure, these people might have done something against the TOS but you never know.

    When you build your house on your own land, you can build it your way on your own terms (more or less).
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    While I'm in agreement with the whole 'digital sharecropping' idea, there is a time and place for working with third party services. The key is to use them for what they are, not basing an entire business on them.

    For example, many of the same people that warn you about using POD or dropshippers will insist that you must have a third party ESP like MailChimp for emailing. Why is relying on an ESP okay, but using a POD service for fulfillment dangerous?

    For the tee business, you could use multiple POD vendors to fulfill orders, while not relying solely on their marketplace for orders.

    All that said, I still think you are making a good decision regarding the education market. While tee shirts may be an evergreen product, the fashion world revolves around constant change. The demand for education, particularly online and on-demand education, has been on an upward trend for some time with no ceiling yet in sight.
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  • Profile picture of the author ThomasMeyers
    Wow, you're both ends of the spectrum. There are unique ways to market either choice. Do the one you're the most passionate about...
    Signature

    Welcome, I hope what I posted up there helped you. Good to chat with warrior legends, rising stars and forum newbies. Tom

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  • Profile picture of the author StarsLaundromat
    If you follow your heart and do something where you can dedicated 100% than you will have higher chances to succeed in that field.
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    • Profile picture of the author Stu48
      Well,

      I truly appreciate everyone's advice.

      Ironically, I have deviated from my initial business ideas. That is, I decided to avoid any education business because, to tell the truth, I am sick of doing it for 22 years.

      As for the t shirt business, well, I started using Instagram for my t shirt company. I have found, in a serendipitous way, that I like the Instagram culture. So, I have started my own 'men's interest' feed. I am curating videos and images, accompanied with what I feel are rich comments, while developing an audience.

      It's tons of fun. My financial plan is to become an influencer and monetize the feed with shoutouts and affiliate marketing.

      As Thomas and Starslaundromat stated, one should do what they enjoy. So, that's what I am doing now. I know it may be hypocritical because I said that I didn't want to be dependent on someone else's property, but I'll take my chances here. It's really fun for me.

      Thanks for all the input!
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  • Profile picture of the author Shakkhor32
    T Shirt Business very good idea. You can work with Fiverr to make T-shirts. Fiverr is develop market place. you create a fiverr account and post your service gig start your business.
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